Hammers

Words for hammer and related things in Celtic languages:

Hammer

Proto-Celtic *ordos = hammer
Gaulish Ordo-vices = placename, tribal name
Old Irish (Goídelc) ord = hammer
Irish (Gaeilge) ord [əuɾˠd̪ˠ / ɔːɾˠd̪ˠ] = sledgehammer
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) òrd [ɔːr̪ˠd] = hammer; cock, hammer (of a fireman): rounded but steep mountain
òrd-fiodha = mallet
òrd-ladhrach = claw hammer
òrd-mòr = sledgehammer
Manx (Gaelg) oard = hammer, sledgehammer
oard inginagh = claw hammer
gaal-oard = steam hammer
Proto-Brythonic *orð = hammer
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) ord, orth, yrd, orð = hammer
Welsh (Cymraeg) gordd [ɡɔrð] = hammer, mallet, sledgehammer
gorddio = to hammer with a mallet, drive with a sledgehammer
gordd haearn = sledgehammer
gordd bren = wooden mallet
Old Breton ord = mallet, hammer,
Middle Breton orz, horz = mallet, hammer,
Breton (Brezhoneg) horzh = mallet, gavel, hammer, pestle
horzhig = sledgehammer
horzh-fuzuilh = rifle butt

Etymology: possibly from the Proto-Indo-European *h₃erg-dʰh₁o-, from *h₃erg- (to perish) and *dʰeh₁- (to do) [source].

Ordovīcēs is the Latin name for a Celtic tribe who lived in what is now North Wales (where I live) and nearby parts of England. In Common Brittonic there were known as *Ordowīcī. The Ordovician geological period (c. 485 – 443 million years ago) is named after them as rocks associated with that period were first found in their former territory by Charles Lapworth in 1879 [source].

Irish (Gaeilge) casúr [əuɾˠd̪ˠ / ɔːɾˠd̪ˠ] = hammer
casúr ladhrach = claw hammer
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) casar [kasər] = small hammer, gavel, knocker
Manx (Gaelg) casoor = hammer (of a gun)

Etymology: from the Anglo-Norman cassur, from the Latin quassō (I shake, quake, wave, flourish), from quatiō (I shake, agitate), from the Proto-Indo-European *kʷeh₁t- (to shake) [source].

Words from the same Latin roots include quash (to suppress, crush) in English, casser (to break) in French, and cascar (to crack, split, hit) in Spanish [source].

Proto-Brythonic *morθul = hammer
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) morthol, morthwl, morthuyl, mwrthol, myrthwyl = hammer
Welsh (Cymraeg) morthwyl [ˈmɔrθuɨ̯l / ˈmɔrθui̯l] = hammer, mallet
morthwylio = to hammer, beat with a hammer, forge
morthwylwr = hammerer
morthwylfa = forge, smithy
morthwyl drws = door knocker
Middle Cornish (Cernewec) morthol = hammer
Cornish (Kernewek) morthol = hammer, beetle, maul
mortholya = to hammer
Middle Breton morzol = hammer
morzol dor = door knocker
Breton (Brezhoneg) morzhol = hammer
morzholad = hammer blow
morzholat = to hammer
morzholer = hammerer, horthumper
morzholig = hammer
morzhol-dor, morzhol an nor = door knocker

Etymology: from the British Latin *mortulus, from the Latin martulus (hammer), from marculus (small hammer), possibly from the Proto-Indo-European *melh₂tlo-, from *melh₂- (to grind) [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Surfaces

Words for surface, skin and related things in Celtic languages:

Swans on Llyn Padarn / Elyrch ar Lyn Padarn

Proto-Celtic *tondā = surface, skin
Gaulish *tondā = surface, skin
Old Irish (Goídelc) tonn, tond = surface, skin
Irish (Gaeilge) tonn [t̪ˠɑun̪ˠ / t̪ˠuːn̪ˠ / t̪ˠʌn̪ˠ] = surface, skin
faoi mo thoinn = under my skin, within me
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) tonn [tɔun̪ˠ] = skin, hide
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) tonn, ton, ton(n)en = ley, unploughed land
Welsh (Cymraeg) ton [tɔn] = ley, unploughed land, turf, sod, sward, green, lawn, (earth’s) surface’ skin, rind, crust, peel, appearance, look
tonnen = skin, rind, crust, peel, surface, sod, sward, bog, swamp, quagmire
tondir = ley, lea-land
toniaraf, toniaru = to cover with planks, boards, etc
Middle Cornish (Cernewec) ton = unploughed land, meadow, lay
Cornish (Kernewek) tonn = grass
Old Breton tonnenn = rind, surface
Middle Breton ton = rind, surface
Breton (Brezhoneg) tonn = rind, surface

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *tend- (to cut off). Words from the same Gaulish / Proto-Celtic roots include tonne in English and French, tunna / tonna (tun, box) in Latin, and tona (surface, kin, bark) in Galician [source].

Proto-Celtic *krokkeno- = skin
Old Irish (Goídelc) croiccenn [ˈkrokʲen͈] = skin, hide, bark, husk
Irish (Gaeilge) craiceann [ˈkɾˠacən̪ˠ / ˈkɾˠæcən̪ˠ] = skin, surface
cruachraicneach = hide-bound
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) craiceann [krɛçgʲən̪ˠ] = skin, parchment
craiceannaiche = skinner
far-chraiceann = epidermis
fo-chraiceann = hypodermic
pàipear-craicinn = parchment
Manx (Gealg) crackan [ˈkraːɣən] = skin, pelt, fur, hide, rind, peel, slough
crackanagh = (of the) skin, cutaneous
aachrackan = veneer
fochrackanagh = hypodermic
crackan screeuee = parchment
Proto-Brythonic *krʉn = skin
Old Welsh groen = skin
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) croen, cruyn, croyn, crwyn = skin, hide, pelt
Welsh (Cymraeg) croen [kroːɨ̯n / krɔi̯n] = skin, hide, pelt, peel, rind, surface, crust; film; a crusty or contemptible fellow
croeni, croenio = to form skin, skin over, heal up
croendenau = thin-skinned, sensitive, easily hurt, touchy
croendew = thick-skinned, insensible, insensitive, callous
croenen = thin skin, cuticle, pellicle, film
Middle Cornish (Cernewec) crochen = skin
Cornish (Kernewek) kroghen = hide
kroghen lagas = eyelid
kroghendanow = sensitive
Middle Breton kroc’hen, krec’hen, krec’hin = skin, crust, membrane
Breton (Brezhoneg) kroc’hen [ˈkʁoːχɛn] = skin, crust
kroc’henenn = membrane

Etymology: probably loaned from a non-Indo-European substrate language [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Servants

Words for servants, ploughmen and related people in Celtic languages.

Tour Scotland March Horse Ploughing

Proto-Celtic *ambaxtos = servant
Gaulish *ambaxtos = vassal, high-ranking servant
Old Irish (Goídelc) amus = servant
amsach = mercenary
Irish (Gaeilge) amhas = hireling, servant, mercenary, hooligan
amhsach = wild, unruly
amhasóireacht = hooliganism
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) amhas [au.əs] = savage, wild person, madman
amhsach = wild, uncontrollable, stupid, dull
Proto-Brythonic *ammaɨθ [amˈmaɨ̯θ] = servant, worker, labourer
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) amaeth = ploughman, husbandman, farmer, agriculture
Welsh (Cymraeg) amaeth [ˈameɨ̯θ / ˈamei̯θ] = ploughman, husbandman, farmer, agriculture, ploughmanship, tillage
amaethadwy = farmable, cultivable
amaetha(f), amaethu = to farm, husband, plough, cultivate
amaethdir = arable land, land suitable for cultivation, farm land
amaethdy = farmhouse
amaethddyn = agriculturalist, farmer
amaethedig = farmed, cultivated, cultured
amaethyddiaeth = agriculture, farming
Cornish (Kernewek) ammeth = agriculture, farming
Old Breton ambaith = agriculture, farming

Etymology: from the Proto-Celtic *ambi- (around),‎ *ageti (to drive) and‎ *-os, from the Proto-Indo-European word *h₂m̥bʰi-h₂eǵ- (drive around) [source].

The English word amassador comes from the same root, via the Middle English ambassadore from the Anglo-Norman ambassadeur (ambassador), from the Old Italian ambassadore, from the Old Occitan ambaisador (ambassador), from ambaissa (service, mission, errand), from the Medieval Latin ambasiator (ambassador), from the Gothic 𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌱𐌰𐌷𐍄𐌹 (andbahti – service, function), from the Proto-Germanic *ambahtaz (servant), from the Gaulish *ambaxtos [source]. The word embassy comes from the same Gaulish word [source].

Proto-Celtic *wastos = servant
Gaulish *wassos = young man, squire
Old Irish (Goídelc) foss = attendant, man-servant, servant
Proto-Brythonic *gwass = boy, servant
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) guas, gwas = boy, lad, servant
Welsh (Cymraeg) gwas [ɡwaːs] = boy, lad, stripling, youngster, young man; servant, attendant, employee, officer, vassal, slave
gwasanaeth = service, attendance, a ministering, office, duty, employment
gwasanaethu = to serve, be a servant, attend, wait upon, minister
Middle Cornish (Cernewec) guas = servant
gwas = a youth, servant, one of the common people, a mean person, a fellow, rogue, rascal
gwasanaeth = attendance, service, bondage, slavery
Cornish (Kernewek) gwas = chap, fellow, guy, servant
gwas hwel = workman
gwas ti = housemaker
Old Breton guos = vassal, man, husband, farmer
Middle Breton goas = vassal, man, husband, farmer (who rents a farm)
Breton (Brezhoneg) gwaz [ˈɡwaːs] = (young) man, vassal, valet, servant, husband, mermaid

Etymology: possibly comes from the Proto-Indo-European word *upo-sth₂-o-s (standing beneath) [source].

The English word vassal comes from the same Celtic roots, via the Old French vassal, the Medieval Latin vassallus (manservant, domestic, retainer), from the Latin vassus (servant) from the Gaulish *wassos [source].

Old Irish (Goídelc) seirbísech = auxiliary, ancillary, servant, agent
Irish (Gaeilge) seirbhíseach = servant
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) seirbheiseach [ʃerʲevɪʃəx] = servant, servitor
seirbheisiche = servant
Manx (Gaelg) shirveishagh = attendant, clergyman, minister, servant, server, vassal

Etymology: from the Old French servise (service, servitude, vasselage), from the Latin servitium (slavery, servitude, service), from servus (servant, serf, slave) [source]

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Bareness

Words for bare, naked and related things in Celtic languages.

A view from Inis Mór

Old Irish (Goídelc) lomm [l͈om] = bare, naked, smooth, exact, threadbare, exact, script, pure, unadulterated, clear (sounds), unlenited
Irish (Gaeilge) lom [l̪ˠɑumˠ/l̪ˠoumˠ/l̪ˠʌmˠ] = bare, thin, close; to lay bare, strip, denude, become bare
lomadh = baring, shearing, stripping, denudation, improveishement, fleecing
lomair = to shear, fleece, denude, despoil
lomaire = shearer, fleecer, shark
lomairt = shearing, clip, denudation, spoliation
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) lom [l̪ˠɔum] = bare, naked, nude, bleak, plain, unadorned, defenceless, destitute, gaunt, meagre, threadbare, leafless, net (weight)
lomnochd = nakedness, nudity, bare, naked
lomradh = denuding, fleecing, shearing, fleece
lomadair = shearer, shaver, barber
lomadh = shaving, shearing, shave, making bare, stripping
moir lom = smooth / calm sea
Manx (Gaelg) lhome = arid, bald, bare, fleshless, leafless, meagre, naked, nude, scraggy, severe, spare, unset, unvarnished, open, neat
lhoamid = smoothness, nakedness
lommyrt = clipping, shear, (sheep-)shearing
lhomeyder = plunderer, shearer, stripper
loamreyder = fleecer, shearer
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) llum, llwm, llom = wave
Welsh (Cymraeg) llwm [ɬʊm] = bare, barren, naked, threadbare, worn, ragged; destitute, needy, poor, plain, simple, humble, empty
llwmder = poverty, nakedness, bareness
llwmhau = to denude, lay bare, despoil, impoverish, deprive
llwmedafedd, llwm ei gotwm = threadbare
y llety llwm = poor place or situation, state of starvation, destitution
troednoeth = barefoot
Cornish (Kernewek) lomm = bare, naked
lommder = bareness
lommas = area of unprofitable farmland
lommhe = to bare, strip bare

Etymology: possibly from the Proto-Indo-European *pleus- (plucking, peeling, feathers, fleece) [source].

Proto-Celtic *noxtos = naked
Old Irish (Goídelc) nocht [n͈oxt] = naked, bare, uncovered
Irish (Gaeilge) nocht [n̪ˠɔxt̪ˠ] = naked, bare, exposed; to bare, strip, uncover
nochtach = naked person
nochtachas = nudity
nochtadh = baring, exposure, disclosure, revelation, appearance
nochtaine = nakedness
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) nochd [n̪ˠɔ̃xg] = naked person, nakedness
Proto-Brythonic noeth = wave
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) noɨθ = naked, bare
Welsh (Cymraeg) noeth [noːɨ̯θ/nɔi̯θ] = naked, nude, undressed, stripped, bare, ill-clad; bare, exposed, bleak, uncovered, bald, hairless, blank
noethi = to bare, undress, denude, remove from, strip, uncover, expore, go bald, deprive, lay bare
noethlun = a nude (in art), destitute
noethlwm = naked, unclothed, ill-clad, bare, bleak, desolate
noethlymunwr = nudist, naturist, stripper, streaker
noethni = nakedness, nudity, barrenness, bleakness
Middle Cornish (Cernewec / Kernuak) noath = naked, bare
noatha = nakedness
noeth = bare, uncovered, void, destitute
Cornish (Kernewek) noth = bare, naked, nude
nothedh = nudity
Old Breton noit = nude, green
Breton (Brezhoneg) noazh = nude, green
noazhkorfer = nudist
noazhkorferezh = nudism

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *nogʷtos from *negʷ- (bare, naked) [source].

Words from the same PIE root include gymnasium, naked and nude in English, naakt (nude, naked, bald) in Dutch, and nacht (naked, bare) in German [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Trembing

Words for trembling, fever and related words in Celtic languages. I chose these words because I have a bit of a fever at the moment.

Thermometer

Proto-Celtic *kritos = fever, trembling, shaking
Old Irish (Goídelc) crith [ˈkʲr͈ʲiθ] = shaking, trembling
crithnaigid = to shake, tremble
Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) crith = shaking, trembling, a shake, tremble
crothaid = shakes, causes to tremble, brandishes
Irish (Gaeilge) crith [crʲɪ(h) / crʲɪç] = tremble, shiver, tremor, shudder, vibration, quiver; to tremble, shake
critheagla = quaking fear, terror, timorousness
crithloinnir = shimmer
crithlonraigh = to shimmer
creathán = to tremble, quiver
creathánach = trembling, quivering, vibratory
creathánaí = trembler
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) crith [krʲih] = quake, shudder, shock, shake, tremble, shiver, vibrate; quaking, shuddering, shocking, shaking, trembling, shivering
critheanaich = trembling
crith-cheòl = warbling, quavering, trills (in music)
crith-thalmhainn = earthquake
crithnich = quake, shudder, shake, tremble, shiver, vibrate
Manx (Gaelg) crie = to shake
craa = to shake
Old Welsh crit = shivering, trembling, fever
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) crid, cryt, kryt = shivering, trembling, fever
crynei, krynu, krennit = to tremble, quake, shiver, shake
Welsh (Cymraeg) cryd [krɨːd / kriːd] = shivering, trembling, dread, fear, ague, fever, disease
crydu, crydio = to shake, tremble, quake
crynu = to tremble, quake, shiver, shake, brandish, vibrate, quaver, gnash, twinkle
echryd = dread, terror, fright, fear, trembling, shivering, tremor; fearful, dreadful, frightful
ysgryd = shiver, trembling, shudder, fright, horror, agony
Middle Cornish (Cernewec) crenne, cranna = to tremble, quake
Cornish (Kernewek) kren = shake
krena, kerna = to shake, shiver, tremble
krenans = vibration
Krener, Krenores = Quaker
dorgrys = earthquake
Old Breton crit = shivering, trembling
Middle Breton (Brezonec) kren, crezn, creen, crein = trembling
crenaff = to tremble
crezn doüar, crein doüar = earthquake
Breton (Brezhoneg) kren = trembling
krenañ = to tremble
kren-douar = earthquake
krendourarel = seismic

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *krit-, from *(s)kreyt-, from *(s)ker- (twist, turn, bend) [source].

The English word scree (loose stony debris on a slope), comes from the same PIE root, via the Old Norse skriða (landscape, landslip) and the Proto-Germanic *skrīþaną (to crawl, glide, walk) [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Sieving Riddles

Today we’re looking at the words for sieve and related things in Celtic languages.

Woman hands sieving flour

Proto-Celtic *krētros = sieve
Old Irish (Gaoidhealg) críathar = sieve
Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) críathar = sieve, riddle
críatharach = marsh, morass, boggy wasteland
críathrad = act of winnowing, sifting, riddling
críathraid = sifts, riddles, spreads
Irish (Gaeilge) criathar [ˈcɾʲiəhəɾˠ / ˈcɾʲiːhəɾˠ] = sieve, riddle
criathach = pitted, perforated, swampy
criathrú = winnowing, sifting, honeycombing
criathradóir = winnower, sifter, maker of sieves
criathraigh = to sieve, winnow, riddle, sift, honeycomb
criathróir = animal surefooted on boggy ground
criathar meala = honeycomb
criathar mín = fine sieve
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) criathar [krʲiə.ər] = riddle, sieve
criathar-tomhais = bushel (measure and implement)
criathar-garbh = riddle (implement)
criatharair [krʲiəhərɛrʲ] = sieve-maker
criathradh [krʲiarəɣ] = (act of) filtering
Manx (Gaelg) creear = sieve, riddle
creearey = sieve, pan, sift, riddle
creear meein = fine sieve
creear garroo = rough sieve
jannoo creear = to honeycomb
Proto-Brythonic *kruɨdr = wandering, sieve
Old Welsh cruitr = winnowing shovel
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) cruidir, crwydr = sieve
Welsh (Cymraeg) crwydr [ˈkrʰʊɨ̯dr̩ / ˈkrʰʊi̯dr̩] = a wandering, a roaming; misfortune, trouble, confusion, rout, dispersion; a straying, aberration, error; winnowing-fan, winnowing-shovel, sieve
crwydro = to wander, roam, stroll, gad about, stray, go astray, deviate, digress
crwydredig = wandering, vagrant, roving, stray
crwydro = barn, granary, farm building
crwydrwr = wanderer, vagrant, vagabond, rover, nomad
Old Cornish croider = sieve, riddle
Middle Cornish croider, crodar = sieve, riddle
Cornish (Kernewek) kroder = coarse sieve, strainer, riddle
kroder kroghen = bodhrán, hold-all
Old Breton croitir = sieve, riddle
Middle Breton croezr = sieve, riddle
Breton (Brezhoneg) krouer = sieve, riddle, screen
krouerañ = to sift, riddle, sieve
krouer liammoù = link generator
rakkroueriañ = pre-screening

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *krey-trom (sieve) from *krey- (to sift, separate, divide) [source].

Words from the same PIE root include crime, crisis, riddle and secret in English, ceart (right, correct, true) in Irish, and crynu (to tremble, shake) and ergryn (horror, dread) in Welsh [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Brushes and Broom

Today we’re looking at the words for brush, broom and related things in Celtic languages.

brooms

Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) scúap [skuə̯b] = brush, broom, sheaf, bundle
scúapad = act of sweeping
scúapaire = sweeper
Irish (Gaeilge) scuab [sˠkuəbˠ] = besom, broom; brush; sheaf, armful, bundle; to sweep
scuabach = sweeping, flowing; gusty
scuabachán = sweeping, sweepings
scuabadh = to sweep, wash
scuabadóir = sweeper
scuabán = little besom, little brush, little sheaf, armful, bundle
scuab fiacla = toothbrush
scuab ghruaige = hairbrush
scuab ingne = nailbrush
scuab phéinte = paintbrush
sreangscuab = wire brush
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) sguab [sguəb] = broom, besom, brush, sheaf
sguabte = brushed, swept
sguabanta = tidy, trim, clean
sguabadh = brushing, sweeping
sguabachan = brush
sguabag = gusty, wind, whisk, sheaf (of corn)
sguabadair = vacuum cleaner
sguabair = sweeper
sguab-aodaich = clothes brush
Manx (Gaelg) skeab = besom, broom
skeabey = brush, brushing, brush over, brush up, sweep, sweeping
skeabit = brushed, swept
skeaban daah, skeaban-slaa = paintbrush
skeaban feeackle = toothbrush
skeaban folt/fuilt = hairbrush
Proto-Brythonic *ɨskʉb = brush, broom
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) escup, yscub, ysgub = brush, broom
Welsh (Cymraeg) ysgub [ˈəsɡɨ̞b / ˈəsɡɪb] = sheaf, wheatsheaf, bundle; brush, broom, besom, quiver of arrows
ysgubell = brush, broom, besom, mop, bunch (of flowers)
ysgubo = to brush, sweep (away), make into sheaves
ysgubol = sweeping
ysgubor = barn, granary, farm building
ysgubwr = sweeper, sweep
ysgub blu = feather duster
priodas (coes) ysgub = informal wedding in which the parties jump over a broomstick in the presence of witnesses
Middle Cornish scibia = to sweep, brush
sciber = barn, any large room
scubilen = whip, scourge
Cornish (Kernewek) skub = sweeping
skubell, skubyllen = broom, brush
skubellik = paintbrush
skubell sugna = vacuum cleaner
skubell-wolghi = mop
skuber, skubores = sweeper
skubus = sweeping
skubya = to brush, sweep
skubyllen dhes = toothbrush
skubyon = refuse, sweepings
Breton (Brezhoneg) skub = broom, brush, blade; sweep
skubell = broom, brush, blade; sweep
skubell-vroust(añ) = scrubbing brush
skuberez = sweeper

Etymology: from the Latin scōpa (broom) Proto-Indo-European *skeh₂p- (to prop) [source]. Words from the same Latin root include scopa (broom) in Italian, escoba (broom) in Spanish, and shqopë (heather, heath, briar) in Albanian [source].

Broom

Proto-Celtic *banatlo- = broom (shrub)
Gaulish *balano- = broom (shrub)
Celtiberian *bálago-, *bálaco- = broom (shrub)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) bealaidh [bɛl̪ˠɪn] = broom (shrub)
bealaidh-Frangach, bealaidh-Sasannach = laburnum
Proto-Brythonic *banatlo- = broom (shrub)
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) banadil, banadyl, banadl = broom (shrub)
Welsh (Cymraeg) banadl, banal = broom (shrub)
banadl Ffrainc = laburnum
Old Cornish banathel = broom (shrub)
Middle Cornish banal = broom (shrub)
Cornish (Kernewek) banadhel = broom (shrub)
Middle Breton balzazn = broom (shrub)
Breton (Brezhoneg) balan = broom (shrub)

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *bʰenH-tlom (way, path) in the sense of “cleared path (in a wood)” [source].

The French word balai (broom, broomstick, brush) comes from the Gaulish *balano-, via Old French, Middle Breton and Old Breton [source]. The Spanish word bálago (straw, Spanish broom), comes from the same Gaulish root, via the Celtiberian *bálago-/*bálaco-,

The shrub known as broom in Britain and Ireland is also known as common broom or Scotch broom, or Cytisus scoparius in Latin. It is a deciduous leguminous shrub native to western and central Europe. Broom can also refer to similar plants, such as French broom and Spanish broom [source]. .

Twigs from the broom, and from other plants, can be tied to a stout stick and used to sweep things. Such implements are tradtionally known as besoms or broom besoms, and became known simply as brooms [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Soft and Tender

Today we’re looking at the words for soft and tender and related things in Celtic languages.

soft

Proto-Celtic *buggos = soft, tender
Old Irish (Goídelc) boc = soft, gentle, tender
Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) boc = soft, gentle, tender, tepid
Irish (Gaeilge) bog [bˠɔɡ / bˠʌɡ] (noun) = soft, tender, flabby, indulgent, lenient, mellow (voice), mild (weather), loose, lukewarm
bog (verb) = to soften, become soft, ease, warm, get milder, move, loosen, rock
bogach = soft, boggy ground
bogachar = softness, bogginess
bogadh = softening, easement, movement, stir
bogánta = soft, squelchy
bogearraí = software
an rud a fhaightear go bog caitear go bog é = easy come, easy go
tóg go bog é = take it easy
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) bog [boɡ] = flabby, soft, limp, pulpy; moist, marshy, boggy, slopp; foolish; damp, humid; indulgent; spiritless; flat (in music); lax (in linguistics)
bogach = bog, fen, marsh, swamp, morass, quagmire
bogachadh = wetting, steeping, moistening, mellowing, softening, swilling
bathar-bog = software
Manx (Gaelg) bog = soft, easy, tender, flabby, pulpy, slack, limp, moist, soft-hearted, callow
boggagh = to soften, steep
strong>boggaghey = to soften, relax, ease, moisten, dissolve
boggyr = soft
boglagh = quagmire, morass, swamp, oozy, boggy
bog-roauyr = podgy
bog-vroiet = soft-boiled
bog- vroojit = squashy
Old Breton buc = soft, tender
Middle Breton boug = soft, tender

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *bʰewgʰ- (to bend, curve, arch) [source].

The English word bog (wet spongy ground, marsh, swamp), was borrowed from the Irish or Scottish Gaelic bogach [source].

English words from the same PIE root include badge, bagel, (to) bow, buck and bow (and arrow) [source].

Old Irish (Goídelc) muad = cloud, mist, fumes
Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) muad, muadh = cloud, mist, fumes
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) muadh = soft, moist
Manx (Gaelg) meeley = soft, bland, smooth, yielding, soft-spoken, moisten, delicate, fine
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) medal, meddal [kam] = soft, yielding, tender, delicate, pliable
Welsh (Cymraeg) meddal [ˈmɛðal / ˈmeːðal] = soft, yielding, tender, delicate, pliable; mild, gentle, placid, tolerant, merciful, lax, inexperienced, foolish, weak
meddalu = to soften, become soft, thaw; to lenite, cause lenition
meddalaidd = soft, softish, tender, immature, foolish, weak
meddalder = softness, soft spot, tenderness, sensitivity
meddaledig = softened, soft, tender
meddalwedd = software
treiglad meddal = soft mutation
Middle Cornish medhal, meddal = soft, mollient, tender
medhalder = softness, tenderness, mildness, gentleness
Cornish (Kernewek) medhel = soft
medhelhe = to lenite, soften, absorb
medhelheans = lenition
medhelweyth = software
Middle Breton mezell = malleable, mean
Breton (Brezhoneg) mezel = malleable, mean, leprosy

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Etymology: unknown

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Crooked

Today we’re looking at the words for crooked and twisted and related things in Celtic languages.

Crooked

Proto-Celtic *kambos = twisted, crooked, bent
Gaulish Cambo- = found in place names
Old Irish (Goídelc) camm, cam [kam] = crooked, bent, curved, twisted; wavy, curly (hair)
Irish (Gaeilge) cam [kaumˠ / kɑːmˠ / kamˠ] = bend, bent, crooked, crookedness, fraud object; to bend, crook, distort
camadán = bent, crooked (person or thing)
camadh = to bend
camalanga = unintelligible talk
camalóid = high-backed, humped (animal), tall stooped person
camán = hurling-stick, hurley, bent, crooked, object, quaver
camarsach = wavy, curled
camas = small bay, curve; (river) bend
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) cam [kaum / kaimə] = bent, crooked, awry, not straight, squinty, wry, one-eyed; bend, curve, trick
cama-chasach = bow/bandy-legged
cam-chòmhdhail = awkward meeting. misadventure
cam-bheulach = wry-mouthed
camadh = bending, curving, curve, curvature, crook, variant, variation
camaghaileach [kamaɣaləx] = twisted, winding
caman = club, stick, shinty stick, quaver
camanachd = shinty
Manx (Gaelg) cam = bent, crooked, deceitful, intricate, knotty, perverse, rakish, wry, wrong
cam-hooilagh = cross-eyed, squinting
cam-jeeragh = meandering, tortuous
camlurgey = bowlegged, bandy-legged
Proto-Brythonic *kam = crooked, bent
Old Welsh cam = crooked, bent
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) cam = crooked, bent
Welsh (Cymraeg) cam [kam] = crooked, bent, hunch-backed, distorted, wry, bowed, curved, looped, winding; one-eyed, squint-eyed; wrong, evil, false, unjust, deceitful; misdeed, sin, vice, injustice, injury
ar gam = in error, erroneously, unjustly, falsely, astray, amiss
ar y cam = in the wrong, culpable
yng ngham = wrong, wrongly, unjustly, in error, faulty
camgymeriad = mistake, misapprehension, misconstruction, error
camni, cami = crookedness, crook, curvature, twist
camog = crookedness, curvature, hump-backed person
camu [ˈkamɨ / ˈkami] = to bend, stoop, curve, bow, pervert, distort, abuse
Middle Cornish cam = crooked, wry, distorted, squint-eyed, perverse, wrong, wicked
camgarrec = bandy-legged
camma = to bend, curve, make crooked; trepass
camnivet = rainbow
camwul = to do wrong
Cornish (Kernewek) kamm = bent, crooked, erroneous, error, wrong
kamma = to curve
kammas = bay, bend
kammdremena = to trespass
kammdreylya = to zigzag
kammdybi, kammwul = to err
kammgemeryans = mistake
kammgonvedhes = to misunderstand
kammhynsek = unjust, unrighteous, wicked
Old Breton cam(m) = curved, curve, lame, bad, wicked
camaff = to bend, limp
Middle Breton kamm = curved, curve
Breton (Brezhoneg) kamm = angled, bent, bend
kammadur = bending, camber, cambering
kammañ = to arch
kammigell = zigzag, squabble, chicane
kammigellañ = to zigzag

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *kh₂em- (to arch), from *(s)ḱh₂embos (crooked) [source].

The Gaulish version of the word appears in the place name Cambo-dunum, also written Kambodunon, which became Campodūnum in Latin, which was a town in the Roman province of Raetia, and is now Kempten in Bavaria in southern Germany [source].

The name Campbell comes from the Scottish Gaelic Caimbeul, from cam (crooked) and beul (mouth) [source], while Cameron comes from Camshròn, from cam (crooked) and sròn (nose) [source].

The Proto-Celtic word *kambos is the root of the Galician words camba (doorjamb of an oven, handmill), cambar (to bend), cambiar (to change) [source].

*kambos was possibly also borrowed into French as camus [ka.my] (flat-nosed, snub-nosed) [source], and this ended up in English as camous/camoys (flat, depressed, crooked nose) [source].

Other English words from the PIE root (*kh₂em-), include camera, camp, campus, champagne and champion [source].

Proto-Celtic *wēros = crooked
Old Irish (Goídelc) fíar = bent, crooked, curved
Irish (Gaeilge) fiar [fʲiəɾˠ] = slant, tilt, bias, obliquity, bend, twist, crookedness, perverseness; slanting, tilted, oblique, diagonal
fiaradh to slant, tilt
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) fiar [fiər] = bent, crooked, squint, wry, oblique, perverse
fiaragach = slanted, twisted, touchy
fiaranaich = slant
fiaradh = slanting, slant, distorting, skewing, distortion
fiarach = inclinning, slanting
fiaras = crookedness
Proto-Brythonic *gwuɨr = crooked, bent
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) gvir, gwyr [ɡwɨr] = crooked, bent
Welsh (Cymraeg) gŵyr [ɡuːɨ̯r/ɡʊi̯r] = askew, slanting, oblique, aslant, cross(-eyed), squinting, crooked, curved, bent, distorted, unjust, dishonest, wrong, evil; wickedness, error, wandering, twist
gwyrio = to bow, stoop, bend, lean, incline, slant, slope
gwyraidd = sloping, slanting, stooping
Cornish (Kernewek) gwarr = curve
gwarak = arch, arc, bow, crescent
Middle Breton goar = curved, curve
Breton (Brezhoneg) gwar = curved
gwared = arch

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *weh₁iros (turned, twisted), from *weh₁y- (to twist, wrap) [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Iron

Today we’re looking at the words for iron and related things in Celtic languages.

iron fence

Proto-Celtic *īsarnom = iron
Old Irish (Goídelc) íarn [iːa̯rn] = iron
Irish (Gaeilge) iarann [ˈiəɾˠən̪ˠ] = iron (element, appliance, golf club); iron part of a tool; brass (money)
amhiarann, iarnmhian = iron ore
iarann rocach = corrugated iron
iaranach = irons, iron implements, fetters, ploughshare
iaranaigh = to put in irons, fit, cover with iron
iaranaí = (made of) iron, iron-hard
iaranáil = to iron (clothes)
iarnmhangaire = ironmonger
iarannaois = the Iron Age
iarna = hardware
iarnród = railway
iarnúil = iron-like, ferrous
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) iarann [iər̪ˠən̪ˠ] = iron, (metal) blade; day’s worth cutting peat (for two)
iarnaidh = ferrous, iron-hard, iron-coloured, stingy
iarnaigeadh, iarnachadh = (act of) ironing
iarnair = ironmonger
iarainn-tàthainn, iarann-sobhdraidh = soldering iron
iarann-dreasaigidh = clothes iron
iarann mòlltaichte = cast iron
iarann preasach = corrugated iron
rathad-iarainn = railway
Manx (Gaelg) yiarn = iron; tool, scythe, blade; dough (money); tip (gratuity)
yiarnagh = ferric
yiarnal = iron, ironing
yiarneyder = ironmonger
yiarnrey = hardware
yiarnaghey, yiarney = to cover with iron, to iron
yiarnoil = ferrous
Proto-Brythonic *hijarn = hard, hard metal, iron
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) heirn, hyarn, heyrn, hayarnn, haearn = iron
Welsh (Cymraeg) haearn = iron, iron bar, hardness, strength, resoluteness, hard, strong, unyielding; sword, spear, lance; iron armour, coat of mail; fetters, shackles; branding-iron, pincers; flat-iron; spur
haearnaidd = like iron, ferrous; strong, hard, callous, oppressive
haearneiddio = to harden, make (one) unfeeling or callous
haearnol = of iron, iron-like, hard, unfeeling, rigid, stern
haearnwr = ironmonger, ironworker
haearn bwrw = cast iron
haearn gwaith = wrought iron
haearn gwrymiog = corrugated iron
Middle Cornish heorn, horn, hôrn = iron
Cornish (Kernewek) horn = iron
hornek = ferric, iron
hornell = iron (for clothes)
hornella = to iron
horner = ironmonger
horn margh = horseshoe
hyns horn = railway
Old Breton hoiarn = iron
Middle Breton houarnn = iron
Breton (Brezhoneg) houarn [ˈhuː.arn] = iron; flat iron; horseshoe
houarnek = ferric
houarnus = ferrous
houarnaj = scrap iron
houarnajer = scrap merchant
houarnañ = to shoe (a horse)
houarn-marc’h = horseshoe
houarn da zistennañ = iron (for clothes)
hent-houarn = railway

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Etymology: probably from the Proto-Indo-European *h₁ēsh₂r̥no- (bloody, red), from *h₁ésh₂r̥ (blood) [source].

Words for iron in Germanic languages come from the same Proto-Celtic root, via the Proto-Germanic *īsarną (iron), including iron in English, ijzer in Dutch, Eisen in German, and järn in Swedish [source].

Words for blood in Romance languages come from the same PIE root, via the Latin sanguīs (blood, descent, progeny, family), including sang in Catalan and French, sangue in Italian and Portuguese, and sangre in Spanish, and also the English word sanguine (blood red; warm, optimistic, confident) [source].

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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