Omniglot News (25/02/24)

Omniglot News

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Kwaio, a Southeast Solomonic language spoken on Malaita Island in Malaita Province of the Solomon Islands.
  • Gela (Nggela), a Southeast Solomonic language spoken in the Nggela (Florida) Islands in the Central Province of the Solomon Islands.
  • Arosi, a Southeast Solomonic language spoken on Makira Island in Makira-Ulawa Province in the east of the Solomon Islands.
  • Touo, a Central Solomonic language spoken in the south of Rendova Island in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands.

New constructed script: Thieṛian Hieroglyphs, which were invented by Kitsune Sobo as a script for the constructed language Thieṛian.

Sample text in Thieṛian

New adapted script: Tengwar Persian, a way to write the Persian (Farsi) language with Tolkien’s Tengwar script devised by Daniyal Motamedi (دانیال معتمدی نیا).

Article 1 of the UDHR in Tengwar Persian

New phrases page: Duala (Duálá), a Bantu language spoken in Cameroon in West Africa.

New numbers pages:

  • Duala (Duálá), a Bantu language spoken in Cameroon in West Africa.
  • Kikuyu (Gĩkũyũ), a Bantu language spoken mainly in the Central Province of Kenya.
  • Gela (Nggela), a Southeast Solomonic language spoken in the Nggela (Florida) Islands in the Central Province of the Solomon Islands.
  • Arosi, a Southeast Solomonic language spoken on Makira Island in Makira-Ulawa Province in the east of the Solomon Islands.

There’s a new Omniglot blog post entitled Various Verses about words for the world beyond your screen, and there’s the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in southern China but isn’t related to Chinese.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Deg Xinag (Degexit’an), a Northern Athabaskan language spoken along the lower Yukon River in Alaska in the USA

In this week’s Adventure in Etymology, we look into the origins of the word Guide.

On the Celtiadur blog there’s a new post entitled A Bit of Bitterness about words for bitter, sour and related things, and I made improvements to the post about words for Honey, Sweet and related things.

I also made improvements to the Duala language page.

For more Omniglot News, see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

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You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (18/02/24)

Omniglot News

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Mono-Alu, a Northwest Solomonic language spoken on Mono, Alu and Fauro islands in the Solomon Islands.
  • Marovo, a Northwest Solomonic language spoken mainly in Marovo Lagoon in the Solomon Islands.
  • Nduke, a Northwest Solomonic language spoken on Kolombangara Island in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands.
  • Babatana, a Northwest Solomonic language spoken on Choiseul Island in the north of the Solomon Islands.

New numbers pages:

  • Nduke, a Northwest Solomonic language spoken on Kolombangara Island in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands.
  • Babatana, a Northwest Solomonic language spoken on Choiseul Island in the north of the Solomon Islands.
  • Hoava, a Northwest Solomonic language spoken mainly in New Georgia Island in the Solomon Islands.
  • Nishi (Nyishi / न्यिसि), a Western Tani language spoken in Arunachal Pradesh and Assam in the northeast of India.

There’s a new Omniglot blog post entitled Fictile Dairymaids about the shared origins of the words fictile, dairy and lady, and there’s the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken along the Yukon River in Alaska in the USA.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Santa / Dongxiang (Sarta kelen / لھجکءاءل), a Mongolic language spoken in Gansu and Xinjiang provinces in the northwest of China.

In this week’s Celtic Pathways podcast, Needles and Scythes, we discover some Romance scythes in a heap of Celtic pins and needles.

On the Celtiadur blog there are new posts entitled Pins & Needles and Muddy Mires, and I made improvements to the posts about words for Red and Blue / Black / Dark.

2,400 days on Duolingo

I also made improvements to the Mundari Bani script page.

In other news, my current streak on Duolingo reached 2,400 days this week, and I finished all the Scottish Gaelic lessons. I’m currently studying Japanese, Spanish and Irish, and sometimes dipping into other languages, particularly Dutch.

For more Omniglot News, see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

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You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.

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Celtic Pathways – Needles and Scythes

In this episode we discover Romance scythes in a stack of Celtic pins and needles.

Pins and Needles

The Proto-Celtic word *delgos means pin or needle. It comes from Proto-Indo-European *dʰelg- (sting) [source].

Related words in the modern Celtic languages include:

  • dealg [ˈdʲal̪ˠəɡ] = thorn, prickle, spine, spike, pin, peg or brooch in Irish
  • dealg [dʲal̪ˠag] = pin, skewer or knitting needle in Scottish Gaelic
  • jialg = needle, prick, quill, thorn or pin in Manx
  • dala [ˈdala] = sting or bite in Welsh

Words from the same Proto-Celtic roots, via Gaulish *dalgis (scythe) and Latin *daculum (scythe) , possibly include dall (mowing, billhook) in Catalan, dalle (scythe) in Spanish, and dalha (scythe) in Occitan (Languedoc) [source].

The English word dagger, and related words in other languages, such as daga (dagger) in Spanish, and Degen (rapier, épée) in German, might come from the same Celtic roots [source].

Words from the same PIE root include dálkur (spine of a fish, knife, dagger, newspaper column) in Icelandic, dilgus (prickly) in Lithuanian, falce (scythe, sickle) in Italian, and falcate (shaped like a sickle) and falcifer (sickle-bearing, holding a scythe) in English [source].

More about words for Pins and Needles in Celtic languages.

You can find more connections between Celtic languages on the Celtiadur blog. I also write about words, etymology and other language-related topics on the Omniglot Blog.

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.

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Omniglot News (11/02/24)

Omniglot News

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Iranun, a Danao language spoken mainly in the southwest of Mindanao island in the south of the Philippines.
  • Onhan (Inonhan​), a Western Bisayan language spoken mainly in the Province of Romblon in the Mimaropa region of the Philippines.
  • Southern Sorsogon, a Central Bisayan language spoken in the south of Sorsogon Province in the Bicol Region of the Philippines.

New numbers pages:

  • Onhan (Inonhan​), a Western Bisayan language spoken mainly in the Province of Romblon in the Mimaropa region of the Philippines.
  • Shompen, a Nicobarese language spoken in Great Nicobar Island, part of the Indian union territory of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

New phrases page: Gallo (galo), a Romance language spoken in parts of Brittany and Normandy in the northwest of France.

There’s a new Omniglot blog post entitled Mud Glorious Mud, which is about some mud-related words such as lutarious (of, pertaining to, or like, mud; living in mud), and there’s the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in the northwest of China.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Murrinh-Patha, an Australian Aboriginal language spoken on the west coast of Australia’s Northern Territory.

In this week’s Adventure in Etymology, we look into the marshy origins of the word Quagmire.

On the Celtiadur blog there are new posts entitled Through and Through and Betwixt and Between, and I made improvements to the Green & Verdant and Blue / Green / Grey posts.

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For more Omniglot News, see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.

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Celtic Pathways – Swampy Cauldrons

In this episode we discover Celtic roots of the name Paris.

Pont des Arts, île de la Cité

Paris is the capital of France and the centre of the Île-de-France or Paris Region. From about 250 BC, the area, particularly the Île de la Cité (see above), an island on the River Seine, was home to the Parisioi, part of the Gaulish Senones tribe.

After the Romans conquered the area in 52 BC, they set up a town on the Left Bank of the Seine which they called Lutetia Parisiorum (“Lutetia of the Parīsiī”). This later became Parisius, and eventually Paris [source].

The Gaulish name of the tribe, Parisioi, which was Latinized as Parīsiī, possibly comes from the Gaulish word *parios (cauldron), from Proto-Celtic *kʷaryos (cauldron) from the PIE *kʷer- (to do, make, build) [source].

Related words in the modern Celtic languages include:

  • coire [ˈkɛɾʲə] = large pot, cauldron, boiler in Irish
  • coire [kɔrʲə] = kettle, corrie, cauldron in Scottish Gaelic
  • coirrey = cauldron, boiler, maelstrom in Manx
  • pair [ˈpai̯r] = cauldron, large pot, boiler in Welsh
  • per [ˈpeːr] = cauldron in Breton

Words from the same Proto-Celtic roots, via Gaulish and Latin, include paiolo (copper cooking pot, cauldron) in Italian, perol (cauldron) in Catalan, perol (cauldron) in Spanish, and pairòl [pai̯ˈɾɔl] (kettle) in Occitan (Languedocien) [source].

Words from the same PIE root include Britain, Brittany and karma in English, cruth [kɾˠʊ(h)] (shape, appearance, state) in Irish, pryd [prɨːd] (sight, appearance, aspect) in Welsh, and काम [kɑːm] (work, task, job, function) in Hindi [source].

Britain and Brittany come from Middle English Britayne/Breteyn (Britain, Brittany), from Anglo-Norman Bretai(g)ne (Britain, Brittany), from Latin Brit(t)ānnia ([Great] Britain, [Roman province of] Britannia), from Βρεττανία (Brettaníā – Brittania, Great Britain), ultimately from Proto-Brythonic *Pritanī (Briton(s)), from Proto-Celtic *Kʷritanī/*Kʷritenī, from the PIE *kʷer- (to do, make, build) [source].

So the name Paris has Celtic roots. How about Lutetia? That comes from Gaulish *lutos (swamp), from Proto-Celtic *lutā (dirt, mud), from PIE *lew- (dirt, mud), which is also the root of lutulent (pertaining to mud, muddy) in English, and lodo (mud, muck, mire) in Spanish [source].

More about words for Cauldrons and Kettles and related things in Celtic languages.

You can find more connections between Celtic languages on the Celtiadur blog. I also write about words, etymology and other language-related topics on the Omniglot Blog.

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.

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Omniglot News (28/01/24)

Omniglot News

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Bahing (बायुङ्), a Western Kiranti language spoken in the west of Koshi Province in eastern Nepal.
  • Jirel (ཇི་རེ་ལ་ / जिरेल), a Southern Tibetic language spoken mainly in Bagmati Province in eastern Nepal.
  • Kahua (Anganiwai), a Southeast Solomonic language spoken on Makira island in the Solomon Islands

New writing system: Meetei Yelhou Mayek, a way to write Manipuri revived / created by Naoriya Phulo in the 1930s.

Sample text in the Meetei Yelhou Mayek

New phrases pages:

  • Korku (कोरकू), a Munda language spoken mainly in the states of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra in central India.
  • Kagate (स्युबा), a Tibetic language spoken in Bagmati Province in eastern Nepal.
  • Samogitian (žemaitiu kalba), an Eastern Baltic language spoken in the Samogitia region in western Lithuania.

New numbers pages: Samogitian (žemaitiu kalba), an Eastern Baltic language spoken in the Samogitia region in western Lithuania.

Logo of the World Endangered Writing Day

There are new Omniglot blog posts about Duostories – translations of the stories from Duolingo in many languages, including ones not featured on Duolingo, and World Endangered Writing Day, a day to celebrate the world’s minority and indigenous scripts and communities, and there’s the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken mainly in Togo in West Africa.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Interlingue (Occidental), an international auxiliary language based on Western European languages that was developed by Edgar von Wahl in the 1920s.

Since it’s been quite stormy here in the UK recently, in this week’s Adventure in Etymology, we look into the origins of the word Storm.

On the Celtiadur blog there’s a new post about words for Stormy Weather and related things, and I made improvements to the posts about words for Black and White and related things.

I also made improvements to the Kabiye language page, and I made a separte page for the Tartessian language.

JapanesePod101.com

For more Omniglot News, see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.

Omniglot News (21/01/24)

Omniglot News

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Kagate / Syuba (स्युबा), a Tibetic language spoken in Bagmati Province in eastern Nepal.
  • Chaná (Lanték Yañá), a Charruan language spoken in Argentina.
  • Chocha Ngacha (ཁྱོད་ཅ་ང་ཅ་ཁ་), a Tibetic language spoken in eastern Bhutan.

New constructed script: Sonos, an alternative phonetically-based script for English devised by C. Seguin and inspired by the Shavian alphabet.

Sample text in Sonos (Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

New English spelling system: New Franklin Alphabet (Nju Fraŋklin Alfybet), an alternative way to write English devised by Haley Wakamatsu and based on Benjamin Franklin’s Phonetic Alphabet.

New numbers pages:

  • Kagate / Syuba (स्युबा), a Tibetic language spoken in Bagmati Province in eastern Nepal.
  • Korku (कोरकू), a Munda language spoken mainly in the states of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra in central India.
  • Malinaltepec Tlapanec (Me̱ꞌphaa Mañuwìín), a variety of Tlapanec, an Oto-Manguean language spoken mainly in Guerrero in southern Mexico.

There’s a new Omniglot blog post entitled Lady Gunilda about the origins of the word gun, and there’s the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this is an International Auxiliary Language based on Romance languages.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Khasi (Ka Ktien Khasi / ক ক্ত্যেন খসি), an Austroasiatic language spoken mainly in Meghalaya state in northeastern India.

In this week’s Celtic Pathways podcast, we discover the soft and tender Celtic roots of the word Bog.

On the Celtiadur blog there’s a new post about words for Bees and related beasts, and I made improvements to the posts about words for Lord, Ruler and To Read.

Improved page: Timbisha, Tiwi and Tlapanec language pages.

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For more Omniglot News, see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.

Celtic Pathways – Soft Bogs

In this episode we discover the soft and tender Celtic roots of the word bog.

Bogs of Connemara

A bog is an area of decayed vegetation which forms a wet spongy ground too soft for walking on, and comes from Middle English bog (swamp, morass), from Irish / Scottish Gaelic bog (soft, tender, marshy, boggy), from Old Irish boc (soft, gentle, tender), from Proto-Celtic *buggos (soft, tender), from PIE *bʰewgʰ- (to bend, curve) [source].

Related words in the modern Celtic languages include:

  • bog [bˠɔɡ / bˠʌɡ] (noun) = soft, tender, flabby, indulgent, lenient, mellow (voice), mild (weather), loose, lukewarm in Irish
  • bog [boɡ] = flabby, soft, limp, pulpy, moist, marshy, boggy, sloppy, foolish, damp, humid in Scottish Gaelic
  • bog = soft, easy, tender, flabby, pulpy, slack, limp, moist, soft-hearted, callow in Manx
  • bouk [buːk] = soft, cozy, heavy, stifling (weather) in Breton

English words from the same PIE root include badge, bagel, bay, (to) bow, bow (and arrow), buck and elbow [source].

Incidentally, the word bog is also slang for toilet / bathroom (originally latrine or outhouse) in the UK (especially in northern England), Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, and a boglet is a small patch of boggy ground, or a kind of supernatural being like a bogle or goblin.

More about words for and related things in Celtic languages.

You can find more connections between Celtic languages on the Celtiadur blog. I also write about words, etymology and other language-related topics on the Omniglot Blog.

Tóg go bog é! (Take it easy! – Irish).

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.

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Omniglot News (14/01/24)

Omniglot News

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Darmiya (Dar’ma), a Sino-Tibetan language spoken in the state of Uttarakhand in northern India.
  • Sengele (kɛsɛ́ngɛlɛ), a Bantu language spoken in southwest of the Democratic Repubic of the Congo.
  • Mongo (Lɔmɔ́ngɔ), a Bantu language spoken in northwest of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
  • Gawri (ګاوری), a Dardic language spoken in the northwest of Pakistan.

New numbers pages:

  • Sengele (kɛsɛ́ngɛlɛ), a Bantu language spoken in southwest of the Democratic Repubic of the Congo.
  • Benga, a Bantu language spoken in southwestern Equatorial Guinea and northwestern Gabon.
  • Kimbundu, a Bantu language spoken in the northwest of Angola.

There’s a new Omniglot blog post about Interlinguistic Conflicts, which is about how closely-related, or even unrelated, languages might fight for dominance in your head, and there’s the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in the northeast of India.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Provençal (prouvençau), a variety of Occitan spoken in Provence in the southeast of France.

In this week’s Adventure in Etymology, we’re dawdling, dilly-dallying and shilly-shallying as we look into the origins of the word Procrastination.

On the Celtiadur blog there’s a new post entitled Modestly Humble, and I made improvements to the post about words for Free and related things.

Improved page: Bisu language page.

JapanesePod101.com

For more Omniglot News, see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.

Omniglot News (07/01/24)

Omniglot News

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

New adapated script: Penobscot Syllabics (ᑆᕋᕚᓂᐤᑄᐤᓯᐤᔨᕕ), which a way, devised by Connor Flood, to use Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics to write Penobscot, an Eastern Abenaki language that was spoken in Maine in the USA until the 1990s and which is being revived.

There are new language pages about:

  • Muinane (Muìnánɨ), a Boran language spoken in southern Colombia.
  • Texistepec (Wää ‘oot), a Gulf Zoque language spoken in Veracruz State in southeastern Mexico.
  • Chimalapa Zoque (aŋpʉn), a Zoque language spoken in the State of Oaxaca in southern Mexico.
  • Sierra Popoluca (Nuntajɨyi), a Zoque language spoken the State of Veracruz in southeastern Mexico.

New numbers pages:

  • Muinane (Muìnánɨ), a Boran language spoken in southern Colombia.
  • Texistepec (Wää ‘oot), a Gulf Zoque language spoken in Veracruz State in southeastern Mexico.
  • Chimalapa Zoque (aŋpʉn), a Zoque language spoken in the State of Oaxaca in southern Mexico.

There’s a new Omniglot blog post entitled Lost in the Geese, in which we look into the French word oie (goose) and related words in other languages, and there’s the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in southern France.

The mystery languages in last week’s language quiz were Bengali, Bassa, Cornish, Hausa and Luxembourgish.

The recordings come from https://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/newyear.htm

In this week’s Celtic Pathways podcast we discover the Celtic roots of the word barnacle and related words in other languages.

On the Celtiadur blog there are new posts entitled Barnacles & Limpets and Dinner, and I made improvements to the post about words for Seas and related things.

Improved page: Wayuu language page.

In other news, I started studying Irish on Duolingo this week. I already know quite a bit as I started learning it about 20 years ago, and spent a week or two studying, speaking and singing Irish in Ireland every summer from 2005 to 2019. I’m planning to go back to Ireland this summer for the first time in 5 years, and I thought I should brush up my Irish.

I don’t know if I’ll start studying any new languages in 2024, or just continue to improve the ones I already know.

What are your language learning plans for 2024?

JapanesePod101.com

For more Omniglot News, see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

Radio Omniglot podcasts are brought to you in association with Blubrry Podcast Hosting, a great place to host your podcasts. Get your first month free with the promo code omniglot.