Omniglot News (27/11/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Aneityum (Anejom̃), a Southern Oceanic language spoken on Aneityum Island in Tafea Province in the south of Vanuatu.
  • Kokota (Ooe Kokota), a Western Oceanic language spoken on Santa Isabel Island in Isabel Province in the Solomon Islands.
  • Nobonob, a Madang language spoken in Madang Province in Papua New Guinea.

New constructed script: Latin Partabet, which is an alternative way to write English using parts of Latin letters.

Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Latin Partabet

New adapated script: Japan Arabic, a way to write Japanese with the Arabic script.

سوبوتي نو نينڬين وا جييوٓ ني اوماري، سونڬين تو كينري نو تيندي بيوٓدوٓديسو. كاريرا ني وا ايشيكي‌ تو كنجوٓ ڬا اري، اوتاڬاي ني كوٓدوٓ سورو هيتسويوٓ ڬا اريماسو كيوٓداي أي نو سييشين دي.

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Manam, a Western Oceanic language spoken on Manam Island in Papua New Guinea.
  • Sursurunga, a Western Oceanic language spoken in Namatanai district of New Ireland Province of Papua New Guinea.
  • Western Subanon (Sinubanon), a Philippine language spoken on the Zamboanga Peninsula in the Mindanao region of the Philippines.
  • Kokota (Ooe Kokota), a Western Oceanic language spoken on Santa Isabel Island in Isabel Province in the Solomon Islands.

New Tower of Babel translation in Aneityum

On the Omniglot blog there’s a new post called Water Trumpets, which is about the French phrase une trombe d’eau (cloudburst, downpour), and there’s the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in parts of West Africa.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Inuinnaqtun, an Inuit language spoken in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, of Canada.

There’s a new Celtiadur post about words for Sticks and Rods and related things in Celtic languages.

On the Celtic Pathways podcast we’re examining some words for flowers and related things.

In the Adventure in Etymology we’re looking into the origins of the word quiver, both the quiver for arrows, and quiver as in to shake, which come from different roots.

In other news, I went to a concert this week featuring N’famady Kouyaté, a singer and musician from Guinea in West Africa, who is based in Cardiff in Wales. He sings in Mandinka and Susu, and possibly in other languages, and also adds bits of English and Welsh in some songs. It was great fun. Here are a couple of his songs:

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (13/11/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Nengone (p’ene nengone), a Southern Oceanic language spoken mainly on Maré and Tiga islands, which are part Loyalty Islands Province in New Caledonia.
  • Daakaka, a Southern Oceanic language spoken in the southwest of Ambrym Island in Malampa Province of Vanuatu
  • Sa (Lokit), a Southern Oceanic language spoken in the south of Pentecost Island in Penama Province of Vanuatu.

New constructed script: Cebuano Script (Suwat Sinugbu), which was created by John Clement Husain and Mares Barrioquinto as an alternative way to write Cebuano (Bisaya), a Philippine language spoken mainly in the Central Visayas region of the Philippines.

Sample text in the Cebuano Script

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Etruscan (mekh Rasnal), a language that was spoken in Eturia in Italy from about 600 BC to the 5th century AD.
  • Nengone (p’ene nengone), a Southern Oceanic language spoken mainly on Maré and Tiga islands in New Caledonia.
  • Ingrian (Ižoran keeli), a Finno-Ugric language spoken in the Ingria region in the northwest of the Russian Federation.

There’s a new version of the Tower of Babel story in Lun Bawang, a North Bornean language spoken in the Sesayap river area of North Kalimantan province in Indonesia.

There’s an Omniglot blog post about the word Myriad and other ways to refer to a large or countless number, and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in the Northern Territory of Australia.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Cimbrian (Tzimbrisch), a Germanic language spoken in northeastern Italy.

There’s a new Celtiadur post about words for Up Above and related things in Celtic languages.

On the Celtic Pathways podcast we’re looking at some Crooked and Twisted words.

In the Adventure in Etymology we’re getting perplexed and confused by the origins of the word Befuddle.

I joined Mastodon this week, specifically Polyglot City. I’ll be posting there fairly regularly as Omniglot. Join me if you’d like to.

In other news, I went to a concert this week featuring the Welsh harpist, Catrin Finch, and the Senegalese kora player, Seckou Keita, who sang in Wolof and Mandinka – not languages you hear very often in Bangor.

Here’s one of the tunes they played:

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (06/11/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Big Numbas (V’ënen Taut), an Oceanic language spoken in the Big Numbas region in the northwest of Malekula Island in Malampa Province of Vanuatu.
  • Neverver, a Southern Oceanic language spoken on Malekula Island in Malampa Province of Vanuatu.
  • Tamambo (Tamabo), a Remote Oceanic language spoken mainly on Malo Island in Sanma province of Vanuatu.

New constructed script: Katemayar, which was created by Bryson Schnaitmann to write his constructed language, Kynaatt.

Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Katemayar

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Ambel (galí Ambél), a Malayo-Polynesian spoken mainly on Waigeo island in West Papua province in eastern Indonesia.
  • Big Numbas (V’ënen Taut), an Oceanic language spoken in the Big Numbas region in the northwest of Malekula Island in Malampa Province of Vanuatu.
  • Paku, an East Barito language spoken in Central Kalimantan province of Indonesia.
  • Warao, a language isolate spoken in Delta Amacuro, Monagas and Sucre states of Venezuela.

There’s an Omniglot blog post called Tidy! about Dutch words for tidying and cleaning, and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in Italy.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Tamahaq, a Northern Berber language spoken in southern Algeria, western Libya and northern Niger.

There are new Celtiadur posts about words for Halloween, Hosts of Folks and related things in Celtic languages.

On the Celtic Pathways podcast we have a A Slew of Slogans, which is about words for slogan, slew and related things.

In the Adventure in Etymology find possible links between the word rubble and words such as rubbish, hale, hail, whole and holy.

Here’s a bit of music – some Minor Noodles that I recorded yesterday featuring a friend on the guitar and me on the mandolin:

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (30/10/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Batak Angkola, a Southern Batak language spoken in the province of North Sumatra in Indonesia
  • Batak Dairi (Kata Pakpak), a Northern Batak language spoken in the provinces of Aceh and North Sumatra in Indonesia.
  • Batak Karo (cakap Karo), a Northern Batak language spoken in the provinces of Aceh and North Sumatra in Indonesia.
  • Batak Simalungun (Sahap Simalungun), a Southern Batak language spoken in the province of North Sumatra in Indonesia.
  • Batak Mandailing (Saro Mandailing), a Southern Batak language spoken in North Sumatra Province in Indonesia.
  • Batak Toba (Hata Batak Toba), a Southern Batak language spoken in the province of North Sumatra in Indonesia.
  • Makalero, a Timor-Alor-Pantar language in the municipality of Lautém in the east of East Timor.

New constructed script: Jierimse, which was invented by Kobey Hill as an alternative way to write Austalian English, and was inspired by the Glagolitic and Ge’ez scripts.

Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Jierimse

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Tobelo, a West Papuan language spoken in the provinces of North Maluku and Papua in Indonesia.
  • Kembayan, a Southern Land Dayak language spoken in West Kalimantan province of Indonesia
  • Kambera (hilu Humba), a Malayo-Polynesian language spoken in Sumba Island in eastern Indonesia.

There are new Tower of Babel translations in:

There’s an Omniglot blog post about spelling and Miss Pelling, and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in parts of North Africa

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Äynu (Äynú / ئهﻳنوُ), a Turkic language spoke in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in the northwest of China.

There’s a new Celtiadur post about words for Heels and related things in Celtic languages.

On the Celtic Pathways podcast we find out what links the word Clan with words such as children, plant and plantain.

As it’s near the end of October, in the Adventure in Etymology we’re investigating the origins of the word hallow, as in Halloween.

I also made improvements to the Batak script, and made separate pages for Batak languages (mentioned above).

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (23/10/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Wapishana (Wapixana), a Northern Arawakan language spoken in Guyana and Brazil.
  • Ketengban, an Eastern Mek language spoken in Highland Papua Province in Indonesia.

New constructed script: High Gavellian, which was created in 2020 by the developers of the Minecraft MMORPG Wynncraft, and is used to write English and Irish in the game.

Sample text in High Gavellian

New adapated script Glagoñol (Ⰳⱉⰰⰳⱁⰾⰹⱌⱏ), which is a way to write Spanish with the Glagolitic alphabet devised by Rodrigo Bustamante Solano.

Ⱅⱁⰴⱁⱄ ⰾⱁⱄ ⱄⰵⱃⰵⱄ ⱆⰿⰰⱀⱁⱄ ⱀⰰⱄⰵⱀ ⰾⰻⰱⱃⰵⱄ ⰵ ⰻⰳⱆⰰⰾⰵⱄ ⰵⱀ ⰴⰻⰳⱀⰻⰴⰰⰴ ⰻ ⰴⰵⱃⰵⱍⱁⱄ ⰻ, ⰴⱁⱅⰰⰴⱁⱄ ⰽⱁⰿⱁ ⰵⱄⱅⰰ'ⱀ ⰴⰵ ⱃⰰⰸⱁ'ⱀ ⰻ ⰽⱁⱀⱌⰻⰵⱀⱌⰻⰰ, ⰴⰵⰱⰵⱀ ⰽⱁⰿⱂⱁⱃⱅⰰⱃⱄⰵ ⱇⱃⰰⱅⰵⱃⱀⰰⰾⰿⰵⱀⱅⰵ ⰾⱁⱄ ⱆⱀⱁⱄ ⰽⱁⱀ ⰾⱁⱄ ⱁⱅⱃⱁⱄ.

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Dawan (Uab Metô), a Timoric language spoken in East Nusa Tenggara province on the island of West Timor in Indonesia.
  • Ngalum, am Ok language spoken in Papua province of Indonesia, and in Sandaun province of Papua New Guinea.
  • Lepki, a South Pauwasi language spoken in Western New Guinea.
  • Mao (Emela), an Angami-Pochuri language spoken in Manipur and Nagaland in northeastern India
  • Ketengban, an Eastern Mek language spoken in Highland Papua Province in Indonesia.

There are new Tower of Babel translations in: Pamona, Tobelo, Termanu, Una, Rampi, Gorontalo, Saluan, Mentawai, Banggai and Sangirese.

There’s a new page of silly phraes, mostly from Duolingo, in Scottish Gaelic

New article: Four Nordic languages around the Baltic Sea – Fynsk, Åländska, Malax and Estonian Swedish

There’s an Omniglot blog post about the Scots word Snoozle, which means to snooze or doze, or to nuzzle, poke with the nose or snuggle, and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is in the northwest of China.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was
Boro / Bodo (बर’ राव), a member of the Sal branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family spoken in northeast India and eastern Nepal.


There’s a new Celtiadur post about words for Peace and Fairies and related things in Celtic languages.

On the Celtic Pathways podcast we look into the origins of words for sacks, bags, bellys and related things in Celtic languages, and discover that the English words bulge, bilge and budget have Celtic roots.

In this week’s Adventure in Etymology we tell tales about the origins of the word spell and related words.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (16/10/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Löyöp, an Oceanic language spoken in the east of Ureparapara Island in northern Vanuatu.
  • Lehali (Loli), an Oceanic language spoken in the west of Ureparapara Island in northern Vanuatu.
  • Mao (Emela), an Angami-Pochuri language spoken in Manipur and Nagaland the northeast of India.

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Aleut (Unangam Tunuu), an Eskimo-Aleut language spoken on the Alaskan Peninsula, and the Aleutian, Pribilof and Commander Islands.
  • Ge’ez (ግዕዝ), the classical language of Ethiopia which is still used as a liturgical language by Ethiopian christians and the Beta Israel Jewish community of Ethiopia.
  • Ketengban (Oktengban), a Trans-New Guinea language spoken West Papua in Indonesia.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post called Jealous Envy, which is about the differences between the words jealousy and envy, and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in the northeast of India and in eastern Nepal.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was
Louisiana Creole (Kréyòl La Lwizyàn), a French-based creole spoken mainly in Louisiana in the USA.

There’s a new Celtiadur post about words for Gloves and Sleeves and related things in Celtic languages.

On the Celtic Pathways podcast we stroll around the words for step, path and related things in Celtic languages.

In this week’s Adventure in Etymology we find out what links the word jelly with words such as cold, chill and glacier.

I also made improvements to the Balinese language, Balinese phrases and Balinese numbers pages.

I wrote a new song called What Did I Come In Here For? – something that I’m sure many people can relate to.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (09/10/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Äiwoo, an Oceanic language spoken mainly in the Reef Islands in Temotu Province of the Solomon Islands.
  • Iaai, a Southern Oceanic language spoken in New Caledonia.
  • Dumi (दुमी‎), a Kiranti language spoken in eastern Nepal.

There’s a new constructed script called Altus, which was devised by Paul Mbongo as an alternative way to write Lingala, a Bantu language spoken mainly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and in the Republic of Congo.

Sample text in Lingala in the Altus alphabet

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Wapishana (Wapixana), a Northern Arawakan language spoken in Guyana and Brazil.
  • Yaghnobi (yaɣnobī́ zivók / яғнобӣ зивок), an Eastern Iranian language spoken in the Yaghnob valley in northwestern Tajikistan.
  • Dumi (दुमी‎), a Kiranti language spoken in eastern Nepal.

There’s a new page with family words in Urdu.

There’s a new Tower of Babel translation in Iaai.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post called Different Worlds, which is about the Japanese stories known as isekai (different world), and the linguistic situations in such worlds, and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in the USA.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was
Nheengatu (ñe’engatú), a Tupí-Guarani language spoken in Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela.

There’s a new Celtiadur post about words for flour and related things in Celtic languages.

On the Celtic Pathways podcast we are digging up the origins of the word Iron.

In this week’s Adventure in Etymology we’re looking into, examining, scrutinizing and underseeking the origins of the word investigate.

In other news. this week my current streak on Duolingo passed 1,900 days, and yesterday I got to 1,904 days. So with my previous 96-day streak, I have now been studying languages every day for the past 2,000 days, or about five and a half years. In that time I’ve completed courses in Swedish, Russian, Danish, Romanian, Czech, Esperanto and Dutch. I also finished all the Spanish lessons, but then they added a whole bunch of new ones, which I’m working on those at the moment. I’m also refreshing my Japanese and Scottish Gaelic.

Do I speak all these languages now? Well, yes and no. I speak some of them fairly well, and can at least have basic conversations in the others. Some I understand and can read better than I speak or write them. The one I know the least of is Romanian, which I hadn’t studied before and tried to learn just using Duolingo. I found it difficult trying to work out the grammar, and there were no explanations.

Recently I’ve been enjoying using Super Duolingo (formerly Duolingo Plus). Normally you have to pay a monthly subscription for it, but I can use it for free, thanks to people who have signed up via one of the links on Omniglot. For each person that signs up, I get a free week. Would it be worth paying for this? Maybe, if you can afford it. You don’t have to worry about making mistakes as you don’t run out of hearts, except in the crown levels, you can practise your mistakes and take tests.

Have you tried Super Duolingo? If so, what do you think of it?

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (02/10/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Hiw, a Southern Oceanic language spoken on the island of Hiw, one of the Torres Islands in Torba province of Vanuatu.
  • Rapa (Reo Rapa), an Eastern Polynesian language spoken on Rapa Iti, one of the Austral Islands in French Polynesia, and on Mangaia in the Cook Islands.

There’s a new constructed script called Nawa, which was created by Arturo Jiménez Zavala as an alternative way to write Spanish and Nahuatl.

Nawa alphabet

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Besermyan (бесерман), a dialect of Udmurt spoken in Udmurtia and the Kirov and Perm regions of the Russian Federation.
  • Rapa (Reo Rapa), an Eastern Polynesian language spoken on Rapa Iti in French Polynesia and Mangaia in the Cook Islands.
  • Fula (Fulfulde / 𞤊𞤵𞤤𞤬𞤵𞤤𞤣𞤫), a Senegambian language spoken in many parts of in West, Central and North Africa.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post called Sake, which is about Japanese words for salmon (鮭 [sáꜜkè]) and alcohol / rice wine (酒 [sàké]), and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in parts of South America.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was
Namonuito, a Micronesian language spoken on Namonuito Atoll in the Caroline Islands in the Federated States of Micronesia.

There are new Celtiadur posts about words for Flowers, Foundations and related things in Celtic languages.

On the Celtic Pathways podcast we are teasing out the origins of the word Wool.

In this week’s Adventure in Etymology we unload the origins of the word Quay, and related words.

I also improved the Beitha Kukju and Elbasan pages, and made a separate page for the Old Uyghur alphabet.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (25/09/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Gourmanchéma (gùlmàncéma), a Gur language spoken mainly in Burkina Faso, and also in Togo, Niger and Benin.
  • Konkomba (Likpakpaln), a Gur language spoken mainly in northern Ghana, and also in northern Togo.
  • Moba (Muaba), a Gur language spoken mainly in northern Togo, and also in southeastern Burkina Faso.

There’s a new constructed script called Mawar, which was created by Eko Wahyu Darmansyah to write his constructed language, Darman.

Sample text in the Mawar

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Rotuman (Fäeag Rotuma), an Oceanic language spoken mainly in the South Pacific island group of Rotuma.
  • Phoenician, a Northern Semitic language that was spoken around the Mediterranean until about the 2nd century AD.
  • Iu Mien (Iu Mienh), a Hmong-Mien language spoken in China, Laos, Vietnam, Thailand.
  • Ewe (Èʋegbe), a Volta-Niger language spoken in Ghana, Togo and Benin.

There’s an Omniglot blog post entitled Fangled, which is about words that are newfangled, oldfangled and just fangled, and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this language is spoken in Micronesian.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was
Gallo (galo), a Romance language spoken in parts of Brittany and Normandy in the northwest of France.

There’ s a new Celtiadur post about words for Buying and Purchasing and related things in Celtic languages.

There’s an episode of the Celtic Pathways podcast about words for Beer and related things.

In the Adventure in Etymology we burrowing into the origins of the word Rabbit, and related words.

I wrote a new song based on idioms that mean something is easy, such as ‘as easy as falling off a log’. It called As Easy As and sounds a bit like this:

You can hear this song, other songs and tunes I’ve written on SoundCloud.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (18/09/22)

Here’s the latest news from the world of Omniglot.

There are new language pages about:

  • Bedawi Arabic (بدوي‎), a variety of Arabic spoken mainly in Egypt and Jordan, and also in Israel, Syria and Palestine.
  • Midland Mixe (Ayüük), a Mixe-Zoque language spoken in the Sierra Norte Region in Oaxaca in southern Mexico.
  • Berba (Byali), a Gur language spoken mainly in northern Benin, and also in Burkina Faso and Togo.

There’s a new phrases page in Basaa (Ɓǎsɔ́ɔ̀), a Western Kru language spoken in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

There are new numbers pages in:

  • Tedim (Tidim), a Kukish language spoken in northwestern Myanmar and northern India.
  • Acehnese (Bahsa Acèh), a Chamic language spoken in Aceh in Sumatra in Indonesia.
  • Dungan (Хуэйзў йүян), a variety of Chinese spoken in Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.

There’s an Omniglot blog post about Wanderwörter, which are words that have spread to many different languages, often via trade, such as tea, wine and chocolate, and the usual Language Quiz. See if you can guess what language this is:

Here’s a clue: this isn’t French, but it’s closely related to French.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was
Iñupiaq (Inupiatun), an Eskimo-Aleut language spoken in northern Alaska in the USA.

There’ s a new Celtiadur post about words for Hammers and related things in Celtic languages.

There’s an episode of the Celtic Pathways podcast about words for Bells and Clocks, and I improved the Bells and Clocks post on the Celtiadur blog.

In the Adventure in Etymology we explore into the origins of the word campus, and find out how it’s connected to words like campaign and champagne.

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