Omniglot News (23/01/22)

Here are details of the latest developments on Omniglot websites and blogs.

The new languages on Omniglot this week are:

  • Lambya (Ichilambya), a Bantu language spoken in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia.
  • Chakhar (ᠴᠠᠬᠠᠷ), a variety of Mongolian spoken in the central region of Inner Mongolia in northern China.
  • Barin (ᠪᠠᠭᠠᠷᠢᠨ), a variety of Mongolian spoken in the southeast of Inner Mongolia in northern China.
  • Nusu, a Loloish language spoken in southern China and northern Myanmar/Burma.

There’s a new numbers page in: Tsakonian (τσακώνικα), a variety of Greek spoken in the Tsakonian region of the Peloponnese in Greece.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post about druids or Oak Knowers, a post about Playing Around which looks at ways to say ‘to play’ in English, Portuguese and Welsh, and the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Lambya (Ichilambya), a Bantu language spoken in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia.

On the Celtiadur this week there’s a post about words for knowledge and related things in Celtic languages.

In the Adventure in Etymology we find out how the word dust is related to words such as dusk, dune and fume.

I wrote a new song about dust, which goes something like this:

I also made improvements to the Russian, Krymchak and Thai language pages, the Theban alphabet page, and the Ukrainian numbers page

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (16/01/22)

Here are details of the latest developments on Omniglot websites and blogs.

The new languages on Omniglot this week are:

  • Southern Qiang (Rrmearr), a Qiangic language spoken in the north of Sichuan Province in the south west of China.
  • Kumzari (لاغة كمزاري), a Western Iranian language spoken mainly in northern Oman, and also in southern Iran.
  • Weitou (圍頭話), a variety of Yue Chinese spoken in southern China, particularly in Shenzhen, and the New Territories of Hong Kong.
  • Alasha (ᠠᠯᠠᠱᠠᠨ), a variety of Mongolian spoken in Inner Mongolia in northern China.

There’s a new constructed script – Featural Lojban Abjad, which is an alternative way to write Lojban devised by Punya Pranava Pasumarty.

There are new numbers pages in: Monguor and Santa and Kumzari.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post about Jargon, and the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Eyak (dAXunhyuuga’), a Na-Dené language that was spoken in south eastern Alaska in USA, and which is being currently being revived.

The Celtiadur post this week is called Mysterious Secrets and looks at words for secret and related things in Celtic languages.

In the Adventure in Etymology this week we’re looking into the strange and unusual origins of the word bizarre.

I also made improvements to the Vietnamese language page.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (09/01/22)

Here are details of the latest developments on Omniglot websites and blogs.

The new languages on Omniglot this week are:

  • Bajaw (Bajo), a Sama-Bajaw language spoken in the southern Philippines, eastern Malaysia and eastern Indonesia.
  • Inabaknon, a Sama-Bajaw language spoken mainly in Eastern Visayas Region of the Philippines.
  • Baybayanon, a Central Bisayan language spoken mainly on the island of Leyte in Eastern Visayas Region of the Philippines.

There’s a new adapated script – Ermənbası (Երմէնբասը) – which is a way to write Azerbaijani with the Armenian alphabet devised by Lily Desputeaux.

There are new numbers pages in: Buryat and Daur, which are Mongolic languages, and in Khitan, an extinct Para-Mongolic language.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post about Resolutions, and the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Bajaw (Bajo), a Sama-Bajaw language spoken in Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines.

On the Celtiadur blog this week there are posts about words for Knives and Forks in Celtic languages.

In the Adventure in Etymology this week we’re delving into the secret and mysterious origins of the word rune.

I also made improvements to the Pohnpeian, Lun Bawang, Maguindanao, Pinyin and Melanau language pages, thanks to Wolfram Siegel.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (02/01/22)

There are two new language pages on Omniglot this week:

  • Umiray Dumaget, a Philippine language spoken in the southern Luzon in the Philippines.
  • Klata (Bagobo-Klata), a Philippine language spoken in the Davao Region in the southern Philippines.

There’s a new adapated script – lshucid (Ⴇⴐⴊⴘⴓⴚⴈⴃ) – which is a way to write Salishan languages such as Lushootseed and Nuxalk using the Georgian Nuskhuri and Asomtavruli alphabets.

There are new numbers pages in: Xibe and Jurchen, which are both Southern Tungusic languages that are, or were, spoken in northern parts of China.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post about the song Auld Lang Syne, and the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Bhojpuri (भोजपुरी), a Bihari language spoken mainly in India.

The Celtiadur post this week is about words for Ladles and Spoons in Celtic languages.

In the Adventure in Etymology this week we look at the origins of the words new and year.

I also made improvements to the Manchu numbers page, and separated the Georgian pages into one about the Georgian language, and others about the Asomtavruli, Nuskhuri and Mkhedruli alphabets.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (26/12/21)

The new language pages on Omniglot this week are:

  • Ratahan (Toratán), a Philippine language spoken in the Southeast Minahasa Regency in the North Sulawesi Province in Indonesia.
  • Tiruray (Teduray), a Philippine language spoken in the Mindanao Region of the Philippines.
  • Tobian (ramarih Hatohobei), a Micronesian language spoken in the Hatohobei and Koroi states in Palau .

There are new numbers pages in: Rejang, Ratahan, Bhojpuri.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post about Perspective, and the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Tokelauan (Gagana Tokelau), a Polynesian language spoken in Tokelau and New Zealand.

There are two Celtiadur posts this week: about words for heat and steps in Celtic languages.

I made a new video featuring Christmas greetings in 16 of the languages I know:

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (19/12/21)

The new language pages on Omniglot this week are:

  • Poqomchiʼ, a Mayan language spoken in central Guatamala.
  • Sipakapense (Ri Qyolb’al), a Mayan language spoken in western Guatemala.
  • Austral (reo Tuha’a pae), an Eastern Polynesian language spoken in the Austral Islands in French Polynesia.

There are new numbers pages in the following languages (all of which are Mayan): Poqomam, Poqomchi’, Mam, Achi and Akatek.

On the Omniglot blog this week there’s a post about Connections between languages, a post about words for porpoises or Sea Swine in various languages, and the Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Tokelauan (Gagana Tokelau), a Polynesian language spoken in Tokelau and New Zealand.

The Celtiadur post this week is about words for Thunder in Celtic languages, and we find out how they are connected to Thursdays, tornados and Celtic and Germanic gods.

In the Adventure in Etymology this week we find connections between companions, bread and lords.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (12/12/21)

The new language pages on Omniglot this week are:

  • Poqomam (Qaq’oral), a Mayan language spoken mainly in the Jalapa Department in southern Guatemala.
  • Tektitek (B’a’aj), a Mayan language spoken mainly in the department of Huehuetenango in western Guatemala.
  • Uspantek (Uspanteko), a Mayan language spoken mainly in the department of Quiché in western Guatemala.

There are new numbers pages in the following languages (all of which are Mayan): Q’eqchi’, Q’anjob’al, Sakapultek, Yucatec Maya, Tektitek and Awakatek.

There’s a new page with a collection of Penny Pinching idioms and sayings in various languages that mean someone is stingy, tight or careful with their money.

On the Omniglot blog we find out when a chair is not a chair in a post entitled Soapy Chairs, and there’s the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Paha, a Kra language spoken in Wenshan Prefecture in Yunnan Province in southern China.

The Celtiadur post this week is about words for Grace and Favour in Celtic languages.

In the Adventure in Etymology this week we’re telling tales about the origins of the word tale.

I also made improvements to the Yucatec Maya and Awakatek language pages.

In other news, I made a little video of a tune I wrote a few years ago called The Whistling Windows / Y Ffenstri Sïo, which you can find on Instagram, TikTok and YouTube:

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (05/12/21)

The new languages this week on Omniglot are all Mayan languages:

  • Itza’, a Yucatecan Mayan language spoken by the Itza people mainly in the village of San José on the north shore of Lake Petén Itzaʼ in Petén department in northern Guatemala.
  • Chontal Maya (Yoko t’an), a Cholan-Tzeltalan Mayan language spoken in central parts of the state of Tabasco in southern Mexico.
  • Chuj (Koti’), a Qʼanjobalan–Chujean Mayan language spoken mainly in western Guatemala, and also in southern Mexico.
  • Mocho’ (Qatoʼk), a Qʼanjobalan–Mocho’ean Mayan language spoken in the state of Chiapas in southern Mexico.

I finally got round to recording a new episode of the monthly Radio Omniglot Podcast. This is Episode 49 and discusses Linguistic Correctness, the idea that there are correct ways to speak and write languages that conform to grammatical standards and conventions.

In this week’s Adventure in Etymology we find out how budgets. bags, bellies and bulges are connected.

There’s a new Omniglot blog post about the wonderful Scots word Humdudgeon, and the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Poqomam, a Mayan language spoken in parts of central Guatemala.

The Celtiadur post this week is about words for Parts and Portions in Celtic languages.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (28/11/21)

This week there are two new language pages on Omniglot :

  • Amdo Tibetan (ཨ་མདོའི་སྐད་), a Tibetic language spoken in the provinces of Qinghai, Gansu and Sichuan and in the Tibet Autonomous Region in western China.
  • Khams Tibetan (ཁམས་སྐད), a Tibetic language spoken in the provinces of Qinghai, Sichuan, Yunnan, and in the Tibet Autonomous Region in western China, and also in eastern Bhutan and northern Myanmar / Burma.

Surat Beringin
There’s a new constructed script: Surat Beringin, which was is a way to write Beka Melayu, a version of Malay with all the non-Austronesian elements replaced with words from Austronesian roots. It is in fact a version of the Aksara Beringin script, which was invented by Adam Damario in 2017 as an alternative way to write Indonesian. The person behind Surat Beringin script prefers to remain anonymous.

There are new numbers pages in: Botlikh (Буйхалъи мицӏцӏи), a Northeast Caucasian languages spoken in southwestern Dagestan in the Russian Federation, and Bamum (Shü Pamom), a Bantoid language spoken mainly in Cameroon.

There are Omniglot blog posts about being Lukewarm and Hairy Cats and Little Dogs, and the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Awngi (አውጚ), a Central Cushitic language spoken in northern Ethiopia.

The Celtiadur post this week is about words for Trousers, Socks and Sites in Celtic languages.

We find out when a gate is not a gate in this week’s Adventure in Etymology.

Stonegate

I also made improvements to the Botlikh and Chakma languages pages.

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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Omniglot News (21/11/21)

There are two new constructed scripts on Omniglot this week: Tainonaíki, which was invented by Javier A. Hernández as a way to write his reconstructed version of the Taino language, and Khoh, a way to write Terengganu Malay devised by Amir Syafiq.

There are new language pages in:

  • Terengganu Malay (Base Tranung), a Malayan language spoken mainly in the state of Terengganu (Tranung) in eastern Peninsular Malaysia.
  • Gaddi (गदी), a Western Pahari language spoken mainly in the Chamba district in the state of Himachal Pradesh in northern India.
  • Rajbanshi (राजबंशी) a Bengali-Assamese language spoken mainly in southeastern Nepal.

There are new numbers page in: Algerian Arabic and Moroccan Arabic, and I made improvements to the Algerian Arabic and Moroccan Arabic language pages.

The Celtiadur post this week is about words for Bark and Beehives in Celtic languages.

This week on the Omniglot blog there’s a post about the Japanese word Otaku (nerd/geek), and a post about reaching 1,600 languages on Omniglot, and the usual Language Quiz.

The mystery language in last week’s language quiz was Gorontalo (Bahasa Hulontalo), a Philippine language spoken in the provinces of Gorontalo and Northern Sulawesi in Indonesia.

This week’s Adventure in Etymology is rather ridiculous and absurd and looks at the origins of the word silly.

A word cloud based on the contents of this post
Generated with WordItOUt

For more Omniglot News see:
https://www.omniglot.com/news/
https://twitter.com/Omniglossia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/omniglot/
https://www.facebook.com/Omniglot-100430558332117

You can also listen to this podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podchaser, PlayerFM or podtail.

If you would like to support this podcast, you can make a donation via PayPal or Patreon, or contribute to Omniglot in other ways.

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