Barnacles & Limpets

Words for barnacle, limpet and related things in Celtic languages.

Limpet Family at Sunny Cove

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Proto-Celtic *barinākos = barnacle, limpet
Gaulish *barinākā = barnacle, limpet
Old Irish (Goídelc) *bairnech = limpet
Middle Irish (Gaoidhleag) bairnech, báirnech = limpet(s)
Irish (Gaeilge) bairneach [ˈbˠɑːɾˠn̠ʲəx] = limpet
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) bàirneach [baːr̪ˠn̪ʲəx] = barnacle, limpet
Manx (Gaelg) baarnagh, barnagh, bayrnagh = barnacle
guiy bayrnag = barnacle goose
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) brennik = limpets
Welsh (Cymraeg) brennig = limpets
brenigen = limpet
Middle Cornish brennic = limpets
brennigen = limpet
Cornish (Kernewek) brennik = limpets
brenigen, bernigen = limpet
Middle Breton brennik = limpet
Breton (Brezhoneg) brennig [ˈbrɛ.nːik] = barnacles, limpets
brennigenn = barnacle, limpet
brennika = to fish for limpets
brennikaer = limpet fisherman

Etymology: from the Proto-Celtic *barinā (rocky ground), and *-ākos (involved with, belonging to) [source].

Words from the same Proto-Celtic roots, via the Gaulish *barinākā and the Latin barnēca (barnacle goose, barnacle, limpet), include bernache (barnacle) in French, barnacle in English, barnacla (brent/brant goose – Branta bernicla) in Spanish [source].

Barnacle Geese

Old Irish (Goídelc) gigrann = barnacle goose
Middle Irish (Gaoidhleag) gigrann, giugrann = wild goose, barnacle goose
Irish (Gaeilge) giúrann = barnacle, shipworm, barnacle (goose)
giúrannach = encrusted with barnacles
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) giùran [gʲuːran] = barnacle
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) gwyran = barnacle goose, barnacles
Welsh (Cymraeg) gwyran = barnacle goose, barnacles
Old Breton (Brethonoc) goirann = barnacle goose, barnacles

Etymology: possibly from the Proto-Celtic *gezdā (goose) – probably of imitative origin [source]. For more details of words for goose in Celtic languages, this post.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Lexicon Cornu-britannicum: A Dictionary of the Ancient Celtic Language of Cornwall, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Beaks and Snouts

Words for beak, snout and related things in Celtic languages.

Waiting for chip's

Proto-Celtic *gobbos = muzzle, snout, beak
Gaulish *gobbos [ˈɡob.bos] = mouth
Old Irish (Goídelc) gop = beak, snout, muzzle
Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) gop, guib, guip = muzzle, snout, beak, point/head of a spear, thin-mouthed, sharp-pointed
Irish (Gaeilge) gob [ɡɔbˠ/ɡɞbˠ/ɡʌbˠ] = beak, bill, tip, point, projection
gobach = beaked, long-billed, sharp (expression), pointed, lipped (jug)
gobachán = sharp-featured person, beak-nosed person, sharp-tongued person, inquisitive/interfering person, chatterer, gossip
gobadh = protrusion, shooting, springing, sprouting
gobaí = bird with a long beak, person with pointed features
gobaireacht = picking, pecking, chattering, chatter, gossip
gobán = (small) tip, point, gag, dummy
goblach = beakful, mouthful, morsel, lump, chunk
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) gob [gob] = beak, bill, gob, pointed/sharp end, corner, spit (of land), point (of a fishing hook)
gobachadh = pecking, rising (wind), poking through
gobad [gobag] = talkative female, little bill, cabin hook
goban = small mouth, small beak
gobaire = chatterbox, chattterer, tell-tale
gobach [gobəx] = beaked, snouty, cheeky, chatty
Manx (Gaelg) gob = apex, headland, hook, jet, jut, nose(piece), point, prominence, promontory, beak, nib, spout, mouth, muzzle, bow (of ship)
gobbagh = beaked, billed, nibbed, prominent, salient
gob-rollian = talkative person

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth). Words from the same Proto-Celtic root include gober (to swallow hole) and gobelet (goblet, cup, beaker) in French, and gob (a slang word for mouth) and goblet in English, [source].

Proto-Celtic *bekkos = beak, snout
Gaulish *bekkos = beak, snout
Proto-Brythonic *bek = beak, snout
Middle Breton (Brezonec) becq, beeg, bêg, beg = mouth, beak, snout, point, cape, summit
Breton (Brezhoneg) beg = beak, mouth, point, mouthpiece, embouchure
beg-douar = point
beg-hir = dolphin

Etymology: possibly from the Proto-Indo-European *bak- (peg, club) [source].

Words from the same roots, via the Gaulish *bekkos and the Latin beccus (beak, bill), include bec (beak, bill, mouth) in French, beco (beak, mouthpiece, burner) in Italian, bico (beak, bill, snout, rostrum) in Portuguese, pico (beak, sharp point, pickaxe, peak, spout) in Portuguese, bek (beak, snout, mouth) in Dutch, and beak in English [source].

Proto-Celtic *gulbā, *gulbīnos = beak, bill
Gaulish *gulbiā = beak, bill
Old Irish (Goídelc) gulban, gulpan = bird’s beak
Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) gulba = beak, mouth, jaw
gulban = beak, sting
gulbanda = beaked, piercing
gulbnech = beaked, sharp-beaked
gulbnén = small beak
gulbnide = biting
gulbniugad nibbing, biting
Irish (Gaeilge) gulba = beak, bill, tip, point, projection
guilbneach = (sharp-)beaked, curlew
guilbnéan = little beak
guilbnigh = to peck
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) gulb [gul̪ˠub] = beak, nose
gulban [gul̪ˠuban] = beak, nose
guilbneach [gulubnəx] = curlew
Proto-Brythonic *gulbino- = beak, snout
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) gilbin, gyluin, gylfin = bird’s beak, snout
gylfinir, gelvinir, gylfinhir = curlew
Welsh (Cymraeg) gylfin = bird’s beak, bill, snout, sharp-pointed nose, mouth, lip
gylfinaid = beakful, mouthful
gylfinir = curlew
gylfinog = beaked, rostrated, wild daffodil, narcissus
Old Cornish geluin = beak, bill
Middle Cornish (Cernewec) gelvin = beak, bill
gelvinac, gylvinac = curlew
Cornish (Kernewek) gelvin = beak, bill
gelvinek = curlew
Old Breton golbin = cape, promontory, headland, rostrum
Middle Breton (Brezonec) golff, golf = tailless
Breton (Brezhoneg) golv = tailless, naturally

Etymology: probably of non-Proto-Indo-European origin. Words from the same root, via Gaulish *gulbiā and the Latin gulbia (piercer, chisel), gulbia (gouge) in Galician, gubia (gouge) in Spanish, gorbia (ferrule) in Italian, and gouge in English and French [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Heather

Today we’re looking at the words for heather and related things in Celtic languages.

Heather

Proto-Celtic *wroikos = heather
Gaulish *wroika = heather
Celtiberian *broikios = heather
Old Irish (Goídelc) froích, fróech = heather
Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) fráech = heather
Irish (Gaeilge) fraoch [fˠɾˠeːx / fˠɾˠiːx / fˠɾˠiːx] = heather, heath, moor
fraochán = bilberry, whortleberry, ring-ouzel
fraochlach = heath
fraochmhá = heath
fraochmhar = heathery
fraoch bán = white heather
fraoch coitianta = Scotch heather, ling
píobaire fraoch = grasshopper
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) fraoch [frɯːx] = heather, ling
fraoch-geal = white common heather (Calluna vulgaris alba
fraoch-bheinn = heather-covered mountain
fraochan = whortleberry, blaeberry, lingonberry, cranberry
fraochach = heathy, heathery
Manx (Gaelg) freoagh = heather, ling, heath
freoagh bane = brier, white heather
freoagh marrey = sea fern
freoagh mooar = Scotch heather
Proto-Brythonic *gwrʉg [ˈɡwrʉːɡ] = heather
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) gruc, gerug, gwrug = heather
Welsh (Cymraeg) grug [ɡrɨːɡ / ɡriːɡ] = heather, ling heath
grug cyffredin = heather, ling, common heath, Calluna vulgaris
grugiar = (red) grouse, willow grouse, heath-hen
gruglus = heath-berries
gruglwyn = bush of heather, sweet broom
grugnythu = to nest or nestle in the heather
grugog = heath-covered, heathery, abounding in heather
Cornish (Kernwek) grug [ɡryːɡ / ɡriːɡ] = heath, heather, ling
grugyar = partridge
Middle Breton groegan = heather
Breton (Brezhoneg) brug = heather

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Etymology unknown, possibly from a non-Proto-Indo-European root [source]. It’s uncertain where the Breton word brug comes from, but it’s likey that it was borrowed from the Latin *brūcus (heather).

The Spanish word brezo (heath) comes from the Vulgar Latin *broccius, from the Proto-Celtic *wroikos, as does the Galician breixo (heather) [source].

Words from the Gaulish root *wroikos (heather), via the Latin *brūcus (heather), include brugo (heather) and brughiera (heath, moor) in Italian, bruc (heather) and bruguera (heath) in Catalan, and bruyère (heather, heath, brier) in French [source].

Eilean Fraoch (Heather Isle) is a nickname for the Isle of Lewis / Eilean Leòdhais in the Western Isles / Na h-Eileanan Siar. Here’s a song about it:

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Wings

Today we’re looking at the words for wings and related things in Celtic languages.

Wings

Proto-Celtic *ɸeto/*feto- = to fly
*fatar/*fatanos/*fetnos = wing, bird
Old Irish (Goídelc) ette [ˈetʲe] = wing, pinion, fin, feather, plume
ettech/ittech = winged, finned, flying, fluttering
Irish (Gaeilge) eite [ˈɛtʲə] = wing, pinion, wing feather, fin, vane
eiteach = winged, pennate, plumed, feathered, finned
eiteog = wing, (little) wing feather, (little) fin, wing-like
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) ite [içdʲə] = feather, plume, fin, overlap, blade
iteach [ihdʲəx] = feathery, feathered, finned
itealach = winged, flying, hovering, fluttering
Manx (Gaelg) fedjag [ˈfaiaɡ] = feather, plume, quill, pinion
fedjagagh = pinnate, feathery
Proto-Brythonic *atanī = wing
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) adain = wing, fin
Welsh (Cymraeg) adain [ˈadai̯n/ˈadɛn/ˈaːdɛn] = wing, fin, arm, sleeve
adeiniog = winged
Old Cornish aden = leaf of a book
Old Breton attanoc = wing

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *peth₂- (to fly, to spread out) [source]. The English words such as feather, petal, pinion and helicopter come from the same PIE root [source].

Words for birds and larks come from the same Proto-Celtic roots.

Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) ascall = armpit
Irish (Gaeilge) ascaill [ˈasˠkəl̠ʲ/ˈasˠkəl̪ˠ] = armpit, recess, avenue, axil
asclán = something carried under arm, armful, gusset
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) asgall [asgəl̪ˠ] = breast, bosom, armpit
Manx (Gaelg) aghlish = axil, armful, armpit
Proto-Brythonic *askell = wing
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) asgell, askell = wing
Welsh (Cymraeg) asgell [ˈasɡaɬ / ˈaskaɬ] = wing, feather, fin, flank, side
asgellog = winged, feathered, flying, finned, scaly, barbed
asgellwr = winger, wing-forward (in sports)
asgellu = to feather (an arrow), put wings on, grow wings, shelter/protect (with wings)
Old Cornish ascall = wing
Cornish (Kernewek) askel = wing
Breton (Brezhoneg) askell [ˈas.kɛl] = wing, fin, flipper

Etymology: from the Latin ascella (wing), from axilla (little wing, axilla, armpit), a diminutive of āla (wing, armpit, shoulder blade) from the Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱs- (axis) [source].

Words marked with a * are reconstructions.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, Online Manx Dictionary, Teanglann.ie, eDIL – Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, logainm.ie, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old Irish glossary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Gerlyvyr Cernewec, Dictionaire Favereau, TermOfis, Le dictionnaire diachronique du breton, Geriafurch, English – ProtoCeltic WordList (PDF), Etymological Dictionary Of Proto Celtic

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Buzzards

Words for buzzard (Buteo buteo) and related birds of prey in the Celtic languages. Some appear to be related to each other, others are not.

Irish (Gaeilge) clamhán = (common) buzzard, bald patch, dodder
clamhán lópach = rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) clamhan [kl̪ˠavan] / claman [kl̪ˠaman] = buzzard
stannaire = (common) buzzard
searrach-ruadh = (common) buzzard
gilm [ɡʲilʲim] = (common) buzzard
bleideir [bledʲɪrʲ] = (common) buzzard
bleideir-molach / bleideir-tònach / clamhan-molach / clamhan-tònach = rough-legged buzzard
Manx (Gaelg) shirragh / shyrragh = buzzard, falcon, kite, seeker, bird of prey
stannair = buzzard, hawk
shyrragh-ruy = (common) buzzard
shirragh mollagh / clowan liauyr-lurgagh = rough-legged buzzard
Welsh (Cymraeg) boda / bòd = buzzard, red kite, great bustard, bird of prey
boda llwyd / boda teircaill = (Common) buzzard
boda bacsiog / boda garwgoes = rough-legged buzzard
bwncath = buzzard
Cornish (Kernewek) bargos = buzzard
bargos gar arow = rough-legged buzzard
Breton (Brezhoneg) baou = buzzard
baou voutin = common buzzard
baou an toundra = rough-legged buzzard

Etymology: unknown

Old Irish (Goídelc) lon [l͈on] = blackbird
Irish (Gaeilge) lon / lon dubh = (Common / Eurasian) blackbird (Turdus merula),
lon creige ring ouzel (Turdus torquatus)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) lon [l̪ˠɔn] / lòn-dubh [l̪ˠɔnˈduh] = blackbird, ouzel
lon-monaidh = ring ouzel

Etymology: unknown

Proto-Celtic *traskl / *trozdi = thrush
Old Irish (Goídelc) truit = starling
Irish (Gaeilge) truis = thrush
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) druid [drɯdʲ] = starling, thrush
Manx (Gaelg) treshlen = song thrush
treshlen vooar = mistle thrush
Welsh (Cymraeg) tresglen = (mistle) thrush
tresglen y crawel = mistle thrush
Breton (Brezhoneg) drask(l) = thrush
drask-su = song thrush
drask-rouee = mistle thrush

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *trozdo- (thrush).

Other Welsh words for blackbird include aderyn du (“black bird”), and pigfelyn (“yellow beak”).

A song thrush in Welsh is y fronfraith (“the speckled breast”), crecer, bronfraith y grug, aderyn bronfraith or bronfraith fawr.

Buzzard

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, MacBain’s Dictionary, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old-Irish Glossary, teanglann.ie, On-Line Manx Dictionary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Dictionnaire Favereau, TermOfis

Blackbirds

Words for blackbirds, thrushes, ouzels and starlings in Celtic languages.

Proto-Celtic *mesal-(s)kā / *meisalko = blackbird
Irish (Gaeilge) smólach = thrush
smólach ceoil = song thursh (Turdus philomelos)
smólach mór = mistle thrush (Turdus viscivorus)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) smèarach [smɛːrəx] / smaolach [smɯːl̪ˠəx] / smeòrach [smjɔːrəx] = thrush, mavis
smeòrach-choitcheann = song thrush
smólach mór = mistle thrush
Proto-Brythonic *miyalx- = blackbird
Welsh (Cymraeg) mwyalchen [muɨ̯ˈalχɛn / mui̯ˈalχɛn] = blackbird
mwyalchen y mynydd = ring ouzel
Cornish (Kernewek) molgh = thrush
molgh dhu = blackbird
molgh loos = song thrush
molgh glas = mistle thrush
molgh meneth = ring ouzel
Breton (Brezhoneg) moualc’h / moualc’h zu = blackbird
moualc’h-venez = ring ouzel

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *h₂ems- (black, blackbird).

Old Irish (Goídelc) lon [l͈on] = blackbird
Irish (Gaeilge) lon / lon dubh = (Common / Eurasian) blackbird (Turdus merula),
lon creige ring ouzel (Turdus torquatus)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) lon [l̪ˠɔn] / lòn-dubh [l̪ˠɔnˈduh] = blackbird, ouzel
lon-monaidh = ring ouzel
Manx (Gaelg) llondoo = blackbird
lhonnag = (immature) blackbird
lhon ny keylley = mistle thrush
lhon fainnit / lhon ny greg = ring ouzel

Etymology: unknown

Proto-Celtic *traskl / *trozdi = thrush
Old Irish (Goídelc) truit = starling
Irish (Gaeilge) truis = thrush
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) druid [drɯdʲ] = starling, thrush
Manx (Gaelg) treshlen = song thrush
treshlen vooar = mistle thrush
Welsh (Cymraeg) tresglen = (mistle) thrush
tresglen y crawel = mistle thrush
Breton (Brezhoneg) drask(l) = thrush
drask-su = song thrush
drask-rouee = mistle thrush

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *trozdo- (thrush).

Other Welsh words for blackbird include aderyn du (“black bird”), and pigfelyn (“yellow beak”).

A song thrush in Welsh is y fronfraith (“the speckled breast”), crecer, bronfraith y grug, aderyn bronfraith or bronfraith fawr.

blackbird

Here’s a tune I wrote called The Blackbird’s Tail / Cynffon yr Aderyn Du:

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, MacBain’s Dictionary, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old-Irish Glossary, teanglann.ie, On-Line Manx Dictionary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Dictionnaire Favereau, TermOfis

Jays

Words for jays in Celtic languages.

Irish (Gaeilge) scréachóg = jay, shrill-voiced bird
scréachóg choille = (Eurasian) jay (Garrulus glandarius)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) sgreuchag [sɡrʲiaxaɡ] = jay, nightjar, heron, gull, owl (a screeching bird); screacher, screamer; shrill woman
sgreuchag-choille [sɡrʲiaxaɡ xɤl̪ʲə] = (Eurasian) jay
Manx (Gaelg) screeaghag = jay
screeaghag cheylley = (Eurasian) jay
Welsh (Cymraeg) (y)sgrech [(ə)sˈkreːχ] = jay, starling; scream, screech, shriek
(y)sgrechog [(ə)sˈkreːχɔɡ] = jay, parrot; screaming, screeching, squealing
(y)sgrech y coed [(ə)sˈkreːχ ə kɔid] = (Eurasian) jay, starling

Etymology: these all mean something like “screecher / screamer (of the woods)”.

Cornish (Kernewek) kegin = jay
Breton (Brezhoneg) kegin-derv = (Eurasian) jay

Etymology: unknown

Eurasian Jay.

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, MacBain’s Dictionary, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old-Irish Glossary, teanglann.ie, On-Line Manx Dictionary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Dictionnaire Favereau, TermOfis

Owls

Words for owls in Celtic languages.

Old Irish (Goídelc) ulchobc(h)án / ulchubc(h)án = owl
Irish (Gaeilge) ulchabhán / ulcachán = (barn) owl (Tyto alba)
ulchabhán donn = tawny/brown owl (Strix aluco)
ulchabhán réisc / ulchabhán chluasgearr = short-eared owl (Asio flammeus)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) ullaid [ul̪ˠadʲ] = (barn) owl
ullaid-sgreuch = barn owl
Manx (Gaelg) hullad = owl
hullad vane / hullad soailt = barn owl
hullad ghoan = tawny/brown owl
hullad eairkagh = long-eared owl (Asio otus)
hullad ny gurreeyn = short-eared owl
Cornish (Kernewek) oula / ula = owl
ula gwynn = barn owl
ula kernek = long-eared owl
ula gwenn = short-eared owl

Etymology: probably of imitative origin

Irish (Gaeilge) cailleach oíche = barn owl
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) cailleach-oidhche [kal̪ʲəxˈɤ̃ĩçə] = (tawny) owl, spiritless fellow
cailleach-oidhche gheal = barn owl
Manx (Gaelg) caillagh oie = barn owl, white owl

Etymology: means literally “night crone/witch”

Irish (Gaeilge) ceann cait = long-eared owl
Manx (Gaelg) kione kiyt = long-eared owl

Etymology: means literally “cat head”

Proto-Celtic *kawannos = owl
Gaulish *cauannos = owl
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) comhachag [kõ.əxag] = owl
comhachag-ruadh / comhachag-dhonn = tawny/brown owl
comhachag-adharcach = long-eared owl
comhachag-chluasach = short-eared owl
Welsh (Cymraeg) cuan = owl
Cornish (Kernewek) kowan [ˈkɔwan / ˈkɔwɐn] = owl
Old Breton couann = owl
Breton (Brezhoneg) kaouenn = owl
kaouenn penn-tev = tawny/brown owl

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *kaw- (owl) – of imitative origin. Related to the Latin căvannus (night owl) [source].

Welsh (Cymraeg) tylluan [təˈɬɨ̞.an / təˈɬiː.an] = owl
tylluan wen / tylluan ysgubor = barn owl
tylluan frech / tylluan felynddu / tylluan y coed / tylluan lwyd / tylluan rudd / y dylluan fig = tawny/brown owl
Breton (Brezhoneg) toud penn-kazh = long-eared owl
toud-lann = short-eared owl

Etymology: probably of imitative origin. I’m not sure if these words are cognate.

Breton (Brezhoneg) grell voutin = barn owl

Etymology: unknown

Welsh (Cymraeg) gwdihŵ [ɡʊdɪˈhuː] = owl
gwdihŵ frech / gwdihŵ goch = tawny/brown owl

Etymology: probably of imitative origin

The owls included here are commonly found in Celtic-speaking lands. Other types of owls are available.

tylluan/owl

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, MacBain’s Dictionary, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old-Irish Glossary, teanglann.ie, On-Line Manx Dictionary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Dictionnaire Favereau, TermOfis

Ducks

Words for ducks in Celtic languages.

Old Irish (Goídelc) *lachu [ˈl͈axu] = duck
Irish (Gaeilge) lacha [ˈl̪ˠaxə] = duck
lacha bhreac / lacha chriosrua / seil lacha = shelduck (Tadorna tadorna)
iolar mara / coirneach / mallard = mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) lach [l̪ˠax] = (wild) duck
crà-ghèadh / cràighiadh / crà-eun = shelduck
lach-Mhoire / lach-riabhach = mallard
Manx (Gaelg) laagh = duck, wild goose
laagh chryss-ruy = shelduck
laagh voirrey / mallard = mallard

Etymology: possibly from the same Proto-Indo-European root as the Lithuanian word lak (to fly).

Irish (Gaeilge) tonóg = duck; dumpy little woman
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) tunnag [ˈtʰun̪ˠak] = duck
tunnag-mhonaidh / tunnag-fhiadhaich = mallard
Manx (Gaelg) thunnag = duck
thunnag vreck = shelduck

Etymology: unknown

Proto-Celtic *awis = bird (?)
Irish (Gaeilge) aí / ai / aoi = swan
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) ai = swan
Proto-Brythonic *(s)awyetos = duck (?)
Middle Welsh (Kymraec) hwyat / hwyeit = duck
Welsh (Cymraeg) hwyad(en) [ˈhʊɨ̯.ad / ˈhʊi̯.ad] = (female) duck
hwyaden yr eithin / hwayaden fraith = shelduck
hwyaden wyllt / meilad = mallard
Old Cornish hoet = duck
Cornish (Kernewek) hos = duck
hos eythyn = shelduck
hos gwyls / mallart = mallard
Breton (Brezhoneg) houad = duck
tadorn toveel = shelduck
houad-korz = mallard

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis (bird) [source], which is also the root of such English words as avian, aviary, aviation and aviator, via the Latin avis (bird).

The species of ducks included here are found in Celtic-speaking lands. Other types of ducks are available.

Ducks!

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, MacBain’s Dictionary, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old-Irish Glossary, teanglann.ie, On-Line Manx Dictionary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Dictionnaire Favereau, TermOfis

Eagles

Words for eagles in Celtic languages.

Proto-Celtic *eriros = eagle
Old Irish (Goídelc) *irar [ˈirar] = eagle
Middle Irish (Gaoidhealg) ilar = eagle
Irish (Gaeilge) iolar [ɟəˈlˠuːn̪ˠ] = eagle
iolar fíréan = golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)
iolar mara / coirneach = white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) iolair [jul̪ˠɪrʲ] = eagle
iolair dhubh / iolair bhuidhe = golden eagle
earn / iolair mhara’ / iolair bhàn = white-tailed eagle
Manx (Gaelg) urley = eagle
urley buigh = golden eagle
urley marrey = white-tailed eagle
Welsh (Cymraeg) eryr [ˈɛrɨ̞r / ˈeːrɪr] = eagle; hero, chief, prince, leader; the constellation of Aquila
eryr aur = golden eagle
eryr y Môr = white-tailed eagle
Cornish (Kernewek) er [eːɹ] = eagle
er / er melyn / ourer = golden eagle
morer / er an mor = white-tailed eagle
Breton (Brezhoneg) erer [ˈeːʁɛʁ] = eagle
erer meur = golden eagle
morer lost gwenn = white-tailed eagle

The species of eagles included here are found in Celtic-speaking lands. Other types of eagles are available.

Etymology: from the Proto-Indo-European *h₃érō (eagle, large bird) [source].

Golden eagle (2)

Sources: Wiktionary, Am Faclair Beag, MacBain’s Dictionary, In Dúil Bélrai English – Old-Irish Glossary, teanglann.ie, On-Line Manx Dictionary, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, Gerlyver Kernewek, Dictionnaire Favereau, TermOfis