Nabataean abjad

Origins

The Nabataean abjad developed from the Aramaic abjad during the 2nd century BC. Stone inscriptions in the Nabataean abjad have been found in Petra, the capital of the Nabataean kingdom (c. 150 BC to 100 AD) and in Damascus and Medina. During the 4th and century AD, the Nabataean abjad evolved into the Arabic alphabet.

Notable features

Used to write

Nabataean, a Semitic language closely related to Aramaic.

Nabataean alphabet

Links

Free Nabataean fonts
http://journalofbiblicalstudies.org/Links/fonts.htm

Semitic languages

Akkadian, Amharic, Arabic (Algerian), Arabic (Egyptian), Arabic (Lebanese), Arabic (Modern Standard), Arabic (Moroccan), Arabic (Syrian), Aramaic, Argobba, Assyrian / Neo-Assyrian, Canaanite, Chaha, Chaldean Neo-Aramaic, Ge'ez, Hadhramautic, Hebrew, Himyaritic, Jewish Neo-Aramaic, Maltese, Mandaic, Nabataean, Neo-Mandaic, Phoenician, Punic, Qatabanic, Sabaean, Sabaic, Silt'e, Syriac, Tigre, Tigrinya, Turoyo, Ugaritic, Western Neo-Aramaic

Consonant alphabets (Abjads)

Ancient Berber, Arabic, Hebrew, Mandaic, Manichaean, Middle Persian, Nabataean, Parthian, Phoenician, Paleo-Hebrew, Proto-Sinaitic / Proto-Canaanite, Psalter, Punic, Sabaean, Samaritan, Sogdian, South Arabian, Syriac, Tifinagh, Ugaritic



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