Mwangwego Loma

The Mwangwego script was invented by Nolence Moses Mwangwego as a way to write Malawian languages. He invented it after visiting France in 1977 and discovering the existence of several other writing systems. He also believed that people in Malawi used to write due to the existence of words for 'write' in Chichewa and Kyandonde (kulemba & kusimba), so he thought he would invent a new one.

Mwangwego started working on the script in 1979, and the first part was finished on 7th April 1997, and the whole script was finished in 2003. During that time it was extensively modified, simplified and refined. After the script was launched, Mwangwego taught a number people to use it, and then put on public lectures and exhibitions about it.

A Mwangwego club was set up for those who have learnt the script, and, according to Nolence Mwangwego, there are currently (January 2012) nearly 395 people using it, and increasing numbers learning it.

So far only one book in the Mwangwego script, A Malawi Tili Pati by Nolence Mwangwego, has been published. It is in Chichewa.

Notable features

  • Type of writing system: syllabary
  • Direction of writing: left to right in horizontal lines.
  • Used to write: languages of Malawi, including Chibemba, Chichewa, Chilambya, Chilomwe, Chimambwe, Chindali, Chingoni, Chinyiha, Chinyika, Chisena, Chisenga, Chisukwa, Chitonga, Chitumbuka, Chiyao, Kinyakyusa, Kyangonde.

Mwangwego script

Mwangwego script

Other symbols (Mituyo)

Other Mwangwego symbols (Mituyo)

Links

Information about the Mwangwego script
http://mwangwego.com
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mwangwego_alphabet

Syllabaries

Bamum, Blackfoot, Caroline Island Script, Carrier, Celtiberian, Cherokee, Cree, Cypriot, Eskayan, Hiragana, Iberian, Inuktitut, Katakana, Kpelle, Loma, Mende, Mwangwego, Ndjuká, Nüshu, Ojibwe, Vai, Yi