Cuyonon

Cuyonon is a member of the Philippine branch of Malayo-Polynesian languages. It is spoken mainly in the Cuyo Islands, between Northen Palawan and Panay Island in the Philippines, by between 93,000 and 120,000 people. Cuyonon was used as a lingua franca in Palawan province until the late 1980s, although the number of speakers there has decreased more recently due to migratation, and to pressure from Tagalog, which is the main language used in schools.

Cuyonon is rarely written, and the only major written work in the language is a translation of the New Testament, which was published in 1982. Various spelling systems have been tried for the language, however none caught on. A project to produce a dictionary of Cuyonon started by Ester Ponce De Leon Timbancaya Elphick, a native Cuyo island who studied education and linguistics in the USA, also involved creating a new orthography, which was discussed with an advisory panel in the Philippines, and with many other speakers of Cuyonon.

Cuyonon alphabet and pronunciation

Cuyonon alphabet and pronunciation

Sample text (Lord's Prayer)

Ameng Ama nga dan kaw sa mga langit, imong aran, O Dios, ipataas da enged y ang tanang tao, basi pa madali ka ren da magadi digi kananmen. Kong maoro nga imong kaliagan ingtotoman dian sa langit, kabay nga tomanen da digi sa logta. Tawan mo kami ra'ang ameng pagkaen sa adlaw-adlaw. Patawaden mo kami sa ameng mga naboat nga kasalanan. Pariho' ang kami ingpapatawad amen da ang mga nakaboat y kasalanan kanamen. Indi mo kami ra ipatokso kong indi' iparaye mo kami ki Santanas. Tenged nga ikaw ang Adi, ikaw ang Makagagaen ig ikaw ang Maimayaen sa ara' kataposan. Amin.

Source: http://www.language-museum.com/encyclopedia/c/cuyonon.php

Translation

Our father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory for ever and ever. Amen.

Information about Cuyonon | Cuyonon numbers

Links

Information about the Cuyonon language
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuyonon_language
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?id=148009715298634&story_fbid=234696786629926
http://www.ethnologue.com/language/cyo/
http://www.redbubble.com/people/metronomad/journal/680924-i-m-a-cuyonon-and-i-love-my-language-by-katherine-jack
http://www15.gencat.cat/pres_casa_llengues/AppJava/frontend/llengues_detall.jsp?id=960&idioma=5
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?id=297837916643&story_fbid=10151627509241644

Cuyonon verbs
http://wiki.verbix.com/Languages/Cuyonon

Videos in Cuyonon
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0AC0CD992CF6F3B2

Malayo-Polynesian languages

Acehnese, Ajië, Aklan, Anutan, Balinese, Batak, Bikol, Bugis, Buhid, Bushi, Cebuano, Cham, Chamorro, Chuukese, Cia-Cia, Cuyonon, Dawan, Drehu, Fijian, Filipino, Futunan, Hanuno'o, Hawaiian, Hiligaynon, Iban, Iloko, Indonesian, Javanese, Kadazandusun, Kapampangan, Kiribati, Madurese, Makasarese, Malagasy, Malay, Mandar, Maori, Maranao, Marshallese, Minangkabau, Moriori, Nauruan, Ndrumbea, Nias, Paamese, Paicî, Palauan, Pangasinan, Pohnpeian, Raga, Rapa Nui, Rarotongan, Rejang, Rotuman, Sakao, Samoan, Central Sinama, Sundanese, Tagalog, Tagbanwa, Tahitian, Tausūg, Tetum, Tokelauan, Tongan, Toraja-Sa'dan, Tuvaluan, Waray-Waray, Xârâcùù, Yapese,

Other languages written with the Latin alphabet


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