Ajië (Waawilûû)

Ajië is a member of the Oceanic branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language family spoken in New Caledonia by between 4,000 and 5,400 people. It is spoken on the east coast of New Caledonia, in Houailou, Monéo, Kouaoua and in inland valleys.

Ajië was first studied by missionaries during the 19th century, particularly by Pastor Maurice Leenhardt, who produced a translation of the New Testament in Ajië in 1922. He was also the first to develop a way of writing the language. A new orthography for Ajië was published in 1976, and took phonological changes in the language into account.

Ajië is taught in a number of schools and colleges, and in the University of New Caledonia.

Ajië alphabet and pronunciation

Ajië alphabet and pronunciation

The first line of transcriptions is the names of the letters, the second line is their pronunciation.

Download a chart of the Ajië alphabet (PDF, in German)

Information compiled by Wolfram Siegel

Links

Information about Ajië
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajië_language
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajië
http://www.ethnologue.com/language/aji
http://www.language-archives.org/language/aji

Malayo-Polynesian languages

Acehnese, Ajië, Aklan, Anutan, Balinese, Batak, Bikol, Bugis, Buhid, Bushi, Cebuano, Cham, Chamorro, Chuukese, Cia-Cia, Cuyonon, Dawan, Drehu, Fijian, Filipino, Futunan, Hanuno'o, Hawaiian, Hiligaynon, Iban, Iloko, Indonesian, Javanese, Kadazandusun, Kagayanen, Kapampangan, Kiribati, Madurese, Makasarese, Malagasy, Malay, Mandar, Maori, Maranao, Marshallese, Minangkabau, Moriori, Nauruan, Ndrumbea, Nias, Paamese, Paicî, Palauan, Pangasinan, Pohnpeian, Raga, Rapa Nui, Rarotongan, Rejang, Rotuman, Sakao, Samoan, Central Sinama, Sundanese, Tagabawà, Tagalog, Tagbanwa, Tahitian, Tausūg, Tetum, Tokelauan, Tongan, Toraja-Sa'dan, Tuvaluan, Waray-Waray, Xârâcùù, Yapese,

Other languages written with the Latin alphabet


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