German, English?

The place to use Languages other than English (LOTE) to discuss whatever you like.
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Tikolm
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Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: German, English?

Postby Tikolm » Sun 23 Dec 2012 6:26 am

linguoboy wrote:
Tikolm wrote:Back on topic, I've never heard any evidence that German is SOV. The conjugated verb always comes between the subject and object; yes, non-finite verbs do come last, but those aren't counted in the word order.

According to whom?
http://german.about.com/library/weekly/aa032700a.htm
I'll let you draw your own conclusions. Most sources I've seen say that the finite verb is in second position and the nonfinite verb comes last. If you can find somebody who says that finite verbs can come last, please post a link.

Anders
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Location: Sweden

Re: German, English?

Postby Anders » Wed 02 Jan 2013 11:53 pm

Tikolm wrote:If you can find somebody who says that finite verbs can come last, please post a link.

Not a link but an explanation. In subordinate clauses (or whatever the english word for Nebensatz is) the finite verb (usually) comes at the very end:

Ich kann sehen, dass er dich sieht. 'I can see that he sees you' or with german word order 'I can see that he you sees'.

So there it is, SOV :)

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Tikolm
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Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: German, English?

Postby Tikolm » Thu 03 Jan 2013 6:53 pm

I rest my case.

Monox D. I-Fly
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Re: German, English?

Postby Monox D. I-Fly » Fri 23 Oct 2015 4:28 am

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:One of the more significant differences is that English is SVO and German is SOV.


Wat.
I didn't know that German has similar sentence structure with Japanese.

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choc_pud
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Re: German, English?

Postby choc_pud » Thu 29 Oct 2015 9:41 pm

choc_pud wrote:Also English used to have the letter wynn "ƿ".


I should also have mentioned that Anglo-Saxon letter 'ȝ', 'yogh', (or 'ȝoȝ'), which originated in the Latin minuscule 'g'. After the arrival of further missionaries from the Vatican during the 900s, the letters 'ȝ' and 'g' became distinct. Again, the Normans were not overly enamoured with this uniquely English letter, and replaced it entirely with either 'g', 'gh' or 'y' (as in 'berg', 'night' and 'yesterday' respectively).

Despite having gone from English by the early 1200s, yogh did survive for considerably longer in the Scots language, spoken in much of southern Scotland. This continued until the arrival of the printing press, when English printers, wishing to print texts in Scots, found that they did not have a type for 'ȝ', replaced it instead with 'z', which at the time (1400s) was often written tailed: 'ʒ'.

This is why there are several Scottish surnames containing an oddly pronounced 'z', for example 'Menzies', which is properly pronounced /ˈmɪŋɨs/. In recent times, however, a spelling-influenced pronunciation has arisen, and this has quickly become the norm. Yogh is still occasionally seen in Scots, however: https://sco.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoch

I hope this was useful and informational. :D
Þu forstanden myccel gód Ængliscum!
Du forstår mal godt dansk!
Du verstehest sehr gut Deutsch!
Vous comprendez très bonne, la français!
Вы знат очынь хорошо па-Русский!
Folchen þeo meor goð Sursðk!
Du farstanden rijt gut Norslandich!


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