Tonal conlangs

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Tonal conlangs

Postby Elijah » Mon 31 Dec 2012 4:48 am

Just want to know if anyone has created any tonal conlangs (either contour or register or level)... I've made one, but it's not my best.
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Re: Tonal conlangs

Postby Tovel » Mon 31 Dec 2012 7:08 pm

I've not done completely, but in my conlang, tollir, there are some structures that are used only in fomal situations and others that are only for colloquial conversations.

However, someday I'll do different registers completely made.
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Re: Tonal conlangs

Postby Anoran » Tue 01 Jan 2013 1:47 am

I have one conlang that uses tonal registers, but its not particularly phonemic.

Not a lot of people seem to have tonal conlangs, from what I've seen.
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Re: Tonal conlangs

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Thu 03 Jan 2013 4:10 am

I wouldn't expect too many. Most conlangers seem to have nontonal first languages.

I was considering a pitch accent in Experimental Conlang A, but the phonotactics seem to lean more toward an iambic stress timing that would suggest stress accent. (I think my complicated agglutinative morphology would suffer in the long term as a result.)
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Re: Tonal conlangs

Postby Khunjund » Fri 01 Aug 2014 8:26 pm

I am currently working on a conlang with a pitch-accent and another with lexical tone. It's strange how an astounding majority of conlangs are non-tonal, whereas the majority of natural languages are tonal.
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