Language quiz

In which country might you find the following dishes on the menu, and which of them is the odd one out?

Zupa ogórkowa
Śledź w śmietanie
Kurczak de volaille
Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym
Kasza gryczana z kwaśnym mlekiem
Księgarnia
Placki kartoflane
Makowiec

Bonus points if you can translate them into English as well.

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This entry was posted in Language, Quiz questions.

18 Responses to Language quiz

  1. Stephen says:

    Obviously Poland! As for which one sticks out…no idea…maybe Kurczak de volaille?

  2. Podolsky says:

    Poland.
    Księgarnia is bookshop.

  3. Polly says:

    Certainly looks Polish:

    Zupa ogórkowa Obviously soup of some kind
    Śledź w śmietanie Something in sour cream

    Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym Pieces of meat in black sauce?
    Placki kartoflane Something with potatoes

    I don’t even know why I’m making the attempt. Some of the items looked familiar.

  4. Osman says:

    I just can say that it is a Slavic language :)

    But people seem to already knew the answer!

  5. David says:

    I’d say Poland, it looks a lot like it :-)

  6. David says:

    Soup Ogórkowa- Zupa ogórkowa
    In cream herring- Śledź w śmietanie
    Chicken de volaille- Kurczak de volaille
    Art of meat in sauce chrzanowym- Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym
    Cereal with acid gryczana- Kasza gryczana z kwaśnym
    Bookstore- Księgarnia
    Potato fried cakes- Placki kartoflane

    And Makowiec I can’t seem to figure out, but half of this doesn’t even make sense and besides that who would eat a bookstore for dinner??

  7. Ben L. says:

    Per Google:

    “Makowiec (pronounced “Ma-KOH-viets”) isn’t, strictly speaking, a holiday bread. But it is a classic Polish dessert or tea bread…”

  8. Ricky says:

    Wouldn’t ‘Zupa ogórkowa’ be cucumber soup?

  9. BnB says:

    The only one I would attempt is the first as Cucumber Soup.

    (Polish style pickles are polski ogorki; “cucumbers” in German are “gurken”)

  10. Simon says:

    Here are the answers:

    The country is Poland.

    Zupa ogórkowa = hot sour cucumber soup

    Śledzie w śmietanie = herring in sour cream, usually with onion

    Kurczak de volaille = chicken steaks spread with butter, filled with mushrooms and bread crumbed, originally French

    Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym = boiled chunk of beef in horseradish sauce

    Kasza gryczana z kwaśnym mlekiem = buckwheat groats with sour milk or buttermilk

    Placki kartoflane = potato pancakes (also known as Placki ziemniaczane)

    Makowiec = sweet poppy cake

    The odd one out was Księgarnia, which means bookshop.

    Source: http://www.staypoland.com/poland-food.htm

    There are some recipies for the above dishes, and other Polish food, here and here.

  11. jdotjdot89 says:

    Totally on topic–I’m going to Poland, Prague, and some other places in eastern Europe. Any quick books or short-term courses for the language lover that anyone could recommend me?

    We definitely need some sort of forum.

  12. jdotjdot89 says:

    On the subject of forums, I was messing around with communications possibilities for a chapter of an organization that I lead, and I ran across Google Groups as a POSSIBLE forum-type thing to use, though it is really more of an e-mail group/listserv–but it could work. What do you think, Simon?

  13. Simon says:

    Here are some sites that might be useful:
    http://www.meetpoland.com/useful-polish-words-and-phrases.html
    http://onestoppolish.com/useful_polish_phrases.htm
    http://www.locallingo.com/
    http://www.myczechrepublic.com/czech_language/czech_phrases.html

    I’m currently setting up a forum using phpbb. If you have any suggestions for categories or forum topics, let me know.

  14. Polly says:

    Topics:
    language exchange – It would be be nice to be able to get quick translations from each other. Or just resources, Like J.J.89 just did.

    Others:
    Language learning (obviously)
    Travel for the language enthusiast (this can be broken out be continent)
    Language as it pertains to religious texts or works of literature
    ancient/dead languages
    English and all its forms
    History of writing
    Conlangs/international (development of, spread of)
    Nearly extinct languages

  15. jdotjdot89 says:

    I like the topics that Polly mentioned; I would just add two. One would be miscellaneous, for random or interesting things, and another would be a category that could cover etymology and/or language comparison and contrast… for example, looking at how words were borrowed from one language or family of languages to another.

  16. Bearrus says:

    As people already says it Poland. And if you very often need to translate poland to english – try link below
    http://www-old.ectaco.com/online/diction.php3?lang=7

  17. IZQ says:

    po polsku :D:D:D

    choć zamiast “kartofle” dałabym “ziemniaki”,bo nikt w sumie malo sie używa tego słowa :p

    sorka że nie po angielsku piszę,ale jeszcze nie umiem go na tyle dobrze :p

    pozdrówka :D pozdrawiam:P

  18. Monika says:

    A Polish menu !! yum yum :)

    ‘Księgarnia’ to be crossed out as it means bookshop.

    I will translate them into the Korean language, because I am a Korean living in Poland. ^_^ The truth is that all the translated menu sounds a little bit strange in Korean words as most of Koreans would not have heard of them or seen them.

    Zupa ogórkowa = 오이 수프

    Śledzie w śmietanie = 크림에 담근 청어

    Kurczak de volaille = 프랑스식 치킨 커틀렛

    Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym = 양고추냉이 소스를 얹은 삶은 고기

    Kasza gryczana z kwaśnym mlekiem = 산패유를 얹은 찐메밀

    Placki kartoflane = 감자 부침

    Makowiec = 양귀비씨 케잌

    Cheers,
    Monika aka Hyesun