Language quiz

In which country might you find the following dishes on the menu, and which of them is the odd one out?

Zupa ogórkowa
Śledź w śmietanie
Kurczak de volaille
Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym
Kasza gryczana z kwaśnym mlekiem
Księgarnia
Placki kartoflane
Makowiec

Bonus points if you can translate them into English as well.

This entry was posted in Language, Quiz questions.

18 Responses to Language quiz

  1. Stephen says:

    Obviously Poland! As for which one sticks out…no idea…maybe Kurczak de volaille?

  2. Podolsky says:

    Poland.
    Księgarnia is bookshop.

  3. Polly says:

    Certainly looks Polish:

    Zupa ogórkowa Obviously soup of some kind
    Śledź w śmietanie Something in sour cream

    Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym Pieces of meat in black sauce?
    Placki kartoflane Something with potatoes

    I don’t even know why I’m making the attempt. Some of the items looked familiar.

  4. Osman says:

    I just can say that it is a Slavic language :)

    But people seem to already knew the answer!

  5. David says:

    I’d say Poland, it looks a lot like it :-)

  6. David says:

    Soup Ogórkowa- Zupa ogórkowa
    In cream herring- Śledź w śmietanie
    Chicken de volaille- Kurczak de volaille
    Art of meat in sauce chrzanowym- Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym
    Cereal with acid gryczana- Kasza gryczana z kwaśnym
    Bookstore- Księgarnia
    Potato fried cakes- Placki kartoflane

    And Makowiec I can’t seem to figure out, but half of this doesn’t even make sense and besides that who would eat a bookstore for dinner??

  7. Ben L. says:

    Per Google:

    “Makowiec (pronounced “Ma-KOH-viets”) isn’t, strictly speaking, a holiday bread. But it is a classic Polish dessert or tea bread…”

  8. Ricky says:

    Wouldn’t ‘Zupa ogórkowa’ be cucumber soup?

  9. BnB says:

    The only one I would attempt is the first as Cucumber Soup.

    (Polish style pickles are polski ogorki; “cucumbers” in German are “gurken”)

  10. Simon says:

    Here are the answers:

    The country is Poland.

    Zupa ogórkowa = hot sour cucumber soup

    Śledzie w śmietanie = herring in sour cream, usually with onion

    Kurczak de volaille = chicken steaks spread with butter, filled with mushrooms and bread crumbed, originally French

    Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym = boiled chunk of beef in horseradish sauce

    Kasza gryczana z kwaśnym mlekiem = buckwheat groats with sour milk or buttermilk

    Placki kartoflane = potato pancakes (also known as Placki ziemniaczane)

    Makowiec = sweet poppy cake

    The odd one out was Księgarnia, which means bookshop.

    Source: http://www.staypoland.com/poland-food.htm

    There are some recipies for the above dishes, and other Polish food, here and here.

  11. jdotjdot89 says:

    Totally on topic–I’m going to Poland, Prague, and some other places in eastern Europe. Any quick books or short-term courses for the language lover that anyone could recommend me?

    We definitely need some sort of forum.

  12. jdotjdot89 says:

    On the subject of forums, I was messing around with communications possibilities for a chapter of an organization that I lead, and I ran across Google Groups as a POSSIBLE forum-type thing to use, though it is really more of an e-mail group/listserv–but it could work. What do you think, Simon?

  13. Simon says:

    Here are some sites that might be useful:
    http://www.meetpoland.com/useful-polish-words-and-phrases.html
    http://onestoppolish.com/useful_polish_phrases.htm
    http://www.locallingo.com/
    http://www.myczechrepublic.com/czech_language/czech_phrases.html

    I’m currently setting up a forum using phpbb. If you have any suggestions for categories or forum topics, let me know.

  14. Polly says:

    Topics:
    language exchange – It would be be nice to be able to get quick translations from each other. Or just resources, Like J.J.89 just did.

    Others:
    Language learning (obviously)
    Travel for the language enthusiast (this can be broken out be continent)
    Language as it pertains to religious texts or works of literature
    ancient/dead languages
    English and all its forms
    History of writing
    Conlangs/international (development of, spread of)
    Nearly extinct languages

  15. jdotjdot89 says:

    I like the topics that Polly mentioned; I would just add two. One would be miscellaneous, for random or interesting things, and another would be a category that could cover etymology and/or language comparison and contrast… for example, looking at how words were borrowed from one language or family of languages to another.

  16. Bearrus says:

    As people already says it Poland. And if you very often need to translate poland to english – try link below
    http://www-old.ectaco.com/online/diction.php3?lang=7

  17. IZQ says:

    po polsku :D:D:D

    choć zamiast “kartofle” dałabym “ziemniaki”,bo nikt w sumie malo sie używa tego słowa :p

    sorka że nie po angielsku piszę,ale jeszcze nie umiem go na tyle dobrze :p

    pozdrówka :D pozdrawiam:P

  18. Monika says:

    A Polish menu !! yum yum :)

    ‘Księgarnia’ to be crossed out as it means bookshop.

    I will translate them into the Korean language, because I am a Korean living in Poland. ^_^ The truth is that all the translated menu sounds a little bit strange in Korean words as most of Koreans would not have heard of them or seen them.

    Zupa ogórkowa = 오이 수프

    Śledzie w śmietanie = 크림에 담근 청어

    Kurczak de volaille = 프랑스식 치킨 커틀렛

    Sztuka mięsa w sosie chrzanowym = 양고추냉이 소스를 얹은 삶은 고기

    Kasza gryczana z kwaśnym mlekiem = 산패유를 얹은 찐메밀

    Placki kartoflane = 감자 부침

    Makowiec = 양귀비씨 케잌

    Cheers,
    Monika aka Hyesun

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