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Learning a new language together with your loved one: tips and tricks

by Aleksander Pichkur

When you go on a diet or begin to work out, it's much easier to stick to your new lifestyle if your partner does the same along with you. If you have a common goal, you're more motivated and you always have your partner by your side when you need support. If you want to learn a new language, you can learn it together. Since you spend a lot of time with your loved one, why don't you dedicate a certain chunk of it to learning some foreign language? It will benefit each of you individually and your couple as a whole. Apart from the knowledge you gain and practice you have, you work as a team and share pleasant moments of communication. So how can you organize your language learning process? Here are some tips for you.

Choose a foreign language

It's a good idea to start learning some language from scratch. The two of you should have zero knowledge of it or know it on the approximately same level. Otherwise, the partner who falls behind will quickly get discouraged. That's why you should be equal students.

Watch original films

Couples like to spend some of their evenings watching good movies. What about watching a movie in the language you're pursuing? An hour will be enough. It's okay that you don't understand anything. Hearing the live speech is important for beginners.

Many of them ignore this recommendation because it can be quite daunting to sit in your room and listen to the flow of unknown sounds that come out of the actors' mouths. Try to listen closely to those sounds and single out distinct words.

Listen to music

For the educational purposes, of course. Create a playlist of songs in the language you're trying to learn and listen to them together in the car, preparing dinner, doing other routines. Obviously, songs have not only the melody but also the lyrics, which consist of sentences that have a tendency to be quickly memorized. Listening to foreign songs will train your hearing skills and make your brain get used to the language. You can always find the lyrics online and translate them or read the available translation.

Send text messages

Even if you're beginners, you need to practice your language skills. Instead of sharing some funny pictures through your messenger, text your beloved in your new language. You can send some romantic nonsense you heard in the songs. This is that case when you can practice language and flirt. You can also have basic dialogs for fun or communicate some casual stuff, like asking your partner when they will be free or asking them to buy something in a supermarket.

Use online dictionaries

Translation services such as Google translate can be useful when you want to quickly text your partner, but it's much more useful to look the unknown words up and then put them in your sentences. This way, you boost your chances to memorize this or that word.

Travel to the country of your new language

When you travel solo, you can fully immerse yourself in the language environment.

When you travel with your partner, you speak your common language most of the time and use the learned language only communicating with locals. If you're disciplined enough, you can make an agreement to use the local language 70% of the time. It's a good idea to stay with a local rather than in a hotel.

Activate your skills whenever it's possible

If you feel like talking in your new language, do it with your partner. Writing is no less important. Sit and write a story for your partner using your vocabulary and looking some words up. Keep texting each other in your new language, watching films, and listening to songs.

Many men who look for Russian girls for marriage want to learn some Russian. Chatting with girls online is a good way to get an elementary competence.

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