Mystery language

Here’s another recording in a mystery language.

I was just sent this clip and asked if I recognise the language. I don’t. Do you?

It sounds like a tongue twister in a Romance language to me, though I don’t know which one.

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This entry was posted in Language, Puzzles.

19 Responses to Mystery language

  1. K says:

    It subtly sounds like Romance language. I am from a multiracial country. It also sounds like one of the Indian languages, which is like what I have heard from my friends spoke.

    Thank you for sharing!

  2. Matthew says:

    This is quite difficult! I was initially going to suggest an Indian language spoken with a strong Italian accent. However, I would think it is a Romance language. Maybe they’re talking about a tiger (tigra), and a heart (cora)? I’m guessing Friulian, Catalan, or some other minor language which isn’t well-known. I’m quite stumped.

  3. LandTortoise says:

    It’s not Catalan!

  4. Basil says:

    It could be a creole of Portuguese and an Indian language, I have heard of one or two of those

  5. Jim Morrison says:

    Interesting.
    camera, cora, quan/da
    lead to me to think it is romance but that is about all.
    And yes it is not Catalan. Also I wouldn’t call Catalan a minor language. It has 10 million speakers.
    I am gonna go for something not romance but with a lot of romance in it…
    Maltese!!!

  6. TJ says:

    hmm I think I would recognize some Maltese myself since it has big influence of Arabic as well.

  7. Macsen says:

    … hmmm yes, Maltese is a good bet. There seemed to be a lot aspirant sounds, which to my Welsh ear, sounded Arabic.

    Very impressed by the ternacity of the Maltese language. Cool-looking language – unique letter for ‘ch’ sound – ‘H’ with two bars across, only Semitic language written in Latin alphabet, loads of Latin words and everyone on the islands speaks the language. Respect!

  8. Matthew says:

    I’m not too certain that it is Maltese. It doesn’t sound like the Maltese I’ve heard before.

  9. Remd says:

    Maybe what I’m going to say is just stupid. I don’t usually participate in quizzes because I’m quite horrible at guessing unknown languages. But as a Romance speaker I am sure it sounds quite different from the Romance languages I know of (which are not too much, anyway.) And I don’t think it’s Maltese either.
    This clip sounds to me like some kind of gibberish similar to jerigonza explained here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibberish_(language_game) but with lots of r’s instead of p’s. Maybe this makes someone come out with a closer clue or maybe I’m completely wrong which is likely.

  10. Petréa Mitchell says:

    At first blush it sounds a bit like Spanish or Italian, but I can’t even make out any structure that resembles either one.

    After listening several times, I don’t think it’s even Indo-European. I think it’s a prefixing language (/ti:gərə/ particularly seems to be occuring with different prefixes), and therefore it’s miles away from anything I’d be able to put a name to.

  11. Aregnorti says:

    Is it glossolalia?

  12. jmock says:

    I agree with ‘Remd’ above – sounds to me like a sort of pig-latin, similar but not quite like one I used to hear kids use in Madrid ages ago.

  13. Jim Morrison says:

    jmock and remd
    Listening to it again, I think you may be right.
    I hope we get an answer!

  14. Apo Waste says:

    Remd is right!! It’s this kind of game and they’re playing in Greek!!! =D

    (I think LOL)

  15. Papric says:

    Apo Waste, are you sure? Doesn’t sound Greek to me.

  16. d.m.falk says:

    Sounded distinctly Latin to me, perhaps the Vulgar (common) form, rather than the better-known proper form.

    d.m.f.

  17. Folk Song says:

    I don’t think it’s a speech. It maybe a text to speech software reading unsorted letters.

  18. Sucaeyl says:

    Language games still often utilize many of the phonemes of the original language. This is makes the recording peculiar as it seems to lack /s/, or any other sibilants as far as I could tell.