Tempus fugit

Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

Finding time to study languages, and do all the other things I enjoy doing (including writing this blog), is quite tricky. Fortunately, because I work at home most of the time, I have some flexibility in when I start and finish my work, and I can take breaks to practice my juggling, etc without disturbing colleagues.

I usually learn a bit more Manx while making toast in the morning – the lessons in the course I’m currently following are all quite short so this works out well.

While eating meals I tend to read serious tomes – at the moment that’s An Introduction to Language and Linguistics, by Ralph W. Fasold and Jeff Connor-Linton, which is very interesting.

While working I listen to online radio in various languages (currently Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Welsh). I don’t actually listen to it closely all the time, but having it playing in the background helps me to absorb new vocabulary and grammar, and to reinforce what I already know of these languages.

In the evening, I study Russian and Irish, practice the tin whistle, and/or learn some more Gaelic songs. When the weather’s fine, I spend the evenings, and weekends, blading, playing hockey and just hanging out with my friends.

Somehow I manage to keep on up-dating and improving Omniglot, and replying to all the correspondence the site generates as well. Maybe one day I’ll be able to give up the day job and concentrate on Omniglot. Now that would be wonderful!

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3 Responses to Tempus fugit

  1. Polly says:

    I often remark that my hobbies could easily fill an 80-hour week. If only I didn’t have to make a living…

  2. Drew says:

    I also enjoy studying Irish, playing the tin whistle, and listening to Gaelic songs- right now I’m trying to memorize Óró, Sé do Bheatha ‘Bahile- having trouble though due to my as yet limited vocabulary and grammar.

  3. Drew says:

    sorry made a mistake in the last one- the song’s proper title is Óró, Sé do Bheatha ‘Bhaile (not ‘Bahile).