Copper plate mystery

This inscription was sent in by a visitor to Omniglot and appears on a copper plate he bought in Turkey.

Original inscription on copper plate

Original inscription on copper plate

Can any of you decipher the text?

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This entry was posted in Language, Puzzles, Writing.

7 Responses to Copper plate mystery

  1. G says:

    That seems a lot like Urdu –

    The second word would be “ilaj” or “cure)

    The first word on the second line seems to be “jo” (who/which),

    – I’ve only had a semester of Urdu (but am fluent in Hindi) so the rest seems difficult but it defintely seems like it’s written in an earlier form of Nastaliq.

  2. TJ says:

    Well its hardly legible, but anyway I can tell the language is not Arabic here. I see names. Mainly 2 names.
    Al-Haj Saleh (Al-Haj is a title given to people who performed pilgrimage, specially elders). The other name is Al-Haj Ibrahim Agha.

    The language can be Farsi, Urdu I suppose.

  3. TJ says:

    ah sorry just noticed now that you mentioned it is from Turkey.
    Yes, makes sense now a bit. The language is Ottoman Turkish I guess. And the two names would be: Al-Haj Saleh Pasha, and Al-Haj Ibrahim Agha.
    Pasha and Agha are typical nobility rank titles in the Ottoman times.

    But it’s extremely hard to read.

  4. Andrew says:

    Yup, pretty sure that’s Ottoman Turkish. I’m not that fluent in it and it is quite hard to read, though. Sorry.

  5. TJ says:

    by the way i think the lowest most part of the plate is a date … i think it is 1237 … of course A.H.

  6. TJ says:

    New word recognized: second line in the middle, the word “Zadeh” (or Zade I think in modern Turkish) meaning “son” or “son of”.

  7. He Midong says:

    It’s Ottoman Turkish indeed. I asked an Iranian Azeri friend who is familiar both with Perso-Arabic script and Turkish language. He could read it easily. Here is what he answered:

    Arabic script:
    مغازه الحاج صالح پاشا کتخداسی
    جوته لی زاده الحاج ابراهیم آغا
    1237

    Modern Turkish script:
    Mağaze El-hâc Salih Paşa Kethüdası
    Cüteli-zade El-hâc İbrahim Ağa
    1237 should be lunar Hijri year. 1431 now. So the thing ages only 6 lunar Hijri years and 7 solar years less than two centuries.

    The meaning is not much but a name.
    “The shop of El-hâc Salih Paşa Kethüdası
    Cüteli-zade El-hâc İbrahim Ağa”