Language quiz

Here’s a recording in a mystery language.

Do you know or can you guess which language it’s in and where it’s spoken?

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This entry was posted in Language, Quiz questions.

18 Responses to Language quiz

  1. Arakun says:

    Talking a wild guess: could it be Georgian or some other Caucasian language.

  2. FM says:

    I’m pretty sure it’s not Georgian, the vowel system seems more complicated than just a-e-i-o-u. The clue, I think, is what sounds like [pArtja sosjaldEmokrat ja ukrajna]. If ‘ja’ means ‘of’, then it definitely can’t be an inflection-heavy Caucasian language. I don’t have a good guess though. Albanian?

  3. Petréa Mitchell says:

    I’m guessing Albanian, only because I think I heard Pristina mentioned. What I am certain of is it’s nothing Slavic, despite the obviously Russian name that kept popping up.

  4. dmh says:

    It’s probably democratija ukraina with the ja forming the ending of the word democracy.

  5. michael farris says:

    I’m gonna guess Tajik, it has a general Iranian sound and references to Russia and/or Ukraine. It doesn’t sound Caucasian to me at all (to the small extent that I have an idea of what those languages sound like).

    Other wild guess might be a very divergent Turkic language from Russia, but I’d have no idea which one.

  6. pennifer says:

    Albanian’s a promising guess. What about Lebanese?

    I suppose it is cheating to google around on names in the audio?

  7. Christopher Miller says:

    Turkic-sounding, with an [y] in Lübnan (Lebanon), and lots of -in endings (Turkic, I believe locative). There’s a loan word from Persian popping up several times: goftogu (conversation, talk) but pronounced guftugu. The ‘Partiya Sosial-demokrat ye Ukraina” seems like a part borrowing from Russian (‘partiya’) crossed with the Persian ‘ezâfe’ construction that Ottoman Turkish scrubbed out of the language post-Atatürk. I think it’s most likely some central Asian Turkic language, but which is a good question.

  8. formiko says:

    To me it sound very nice, like a French sounding Turkish language. I’m going to take stab in the dark and say Azerbaijani.

  9. peter j. franke says:

    It’s a news report so to hear with short lines about sveral items. Nice clear recording. But now… the language, mmm… not Albanian, that sounds different. I too heard the Farsi and Urdu word “guftagu” but also some turkic aspirated soundings. So, somewhere in between. Turkmen?

  10. bronz says:

    I agree with Christopher, quite Turkic-sounding. I hear a lot of -de/da (locative; or possibly even 3rd p sing. past tense?), a -dan or two (ablative), and quite a few -e/ye (dative). The -in is definitely common (at least in Turkish) as a genitive case marker. But all the non-Turkic proper nouns are distracting.

  11. Ibrahim says:

    Could it be Cimean Tatar?

  12. Ibrahim says:

    I meant to write CRIMEAN.The Tatars who live in Ukraine in the Crimean peninsula,not to be confused with other Tatars elsewhere.

  13. michael farris says:

    I was also half-wondering about Crimean Tatar.

  14. Simon says:

    It isn’t Crimean Tatar or any other Turkic language, but this language is spoken in a number of countries where Turkic languages are used so may have been influenced by them.

  15. Christopher Miller says:

    Oooh, talk of dangling a tantalising clue in front of our noses, now!
    ;-D

    My second guess would be a language in the Iranian group, especially because of what *seems* to be a lot of Farsi-like”ezâfe” ‘-ye’ (basically equivalent to ‘of’) and what sounds like ‘-ande’ participle endings (equivalent to ‘-ing’, ‘-end’, ‘-ando/iendo’, ‘-ant’ in various Germanic and Romance languages). Michael Farris’s guess of Tajik would fit well, especially considering this last clue, and that’s what I was considering. However it seemed it didn’t sound similar enough to Farsi otherwise and had some un-Farsi-like vowels… Perhaps a Kurdish language?

  16. peter j. franke says:

    Okay, after this information, Simon, I follow my very first thought and go for Kurdish. Some years ago I dealt with Kurdish speaking Iraqi refugees and this recording sounds like that…

  17. Simon says:

    The language is Kurdish (Kurdí / کوردی / к’öрди) which is spoken in Iraq, Turkey, Iran and quite a few other countries.

    The recording comes from RUVR – The Voice of Russia

  18. locuroso says:

    it’s sounds more like a language from the india area, I know i’ve heard it before. I’m going to say bengali.