Name the language

Here’s a recording of part of a story in a mystery language.

Do you know or can you guess which language it’s in and where it’s spoken?

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This entry was posted in Language, Quiz questions.

26 Responses to Name the language

  1. MäcØSŸ says:

    Shot in the dark: Gujarati?

  2. Felix says:

    Sounds Romanian to me. I’m probably wrong, since it’ll probably one of those crazy Italian dialects that are barely spoken anymore…

  3. Jayan says:

    I agree on the Romanian, but I’m probably wrong…I suck at these langauge quizes, but I love ‘em.

  4. Doug says:

    I’m useless at this because I thought I heard Italian, Spanish, Hindi and at the end it went quite oriental – maybe Vietnamese or Malaysian?

  5. Sean says:

    It’s got something to do with the Romance languages, or just highly coincidental that I heard things like “aquesto,” “levant-” etc

  6. language hat says:

    I’m guessing Romanian too, though I wouldn’t rule out crazy Italian dialects.

  7. BG says:

    Maybe Filipino because of the influence of Spanish? Otherwise my first thought was also an obscure Italian dialect.

  8. prase says:

    To me, it sounds Turkic. I will guess Kyrgyz. I will be very surprised if it turns out to be indeed any Romance language.

  9. David Marjanović says:

    Something in central Russia, I’d guess.

    Definitely not Turkic: there’s not a single ö or ü in it.

  10. David Marjanović says:

    Well, “central”… I mean Mari or something geographically within, like, 1000 km of that. Just not Turkic. And not Russian of course.

  11. HP says:

    I’m hearing a romance language, too. I hear the “eu” and “ão” sounds from Portuguese. Is it Mirandese?

  12. Aron says:

    Is it a form of Rhaeto-Romance?

  13. Al says:

    Romani?

  14. rrr says:

    I didn’t understand much but it’s definitely Romance. Rumantsch?

  15. bronz says:

    Sounds kind of Portuguese-y to me, and closer to Brazilian in terms of its singsong quality — I would off-hand guess it’s a Portuguese Creole? But I wouldn’t know which one except that it doesn’t sound quite like Papiamentu nor Cape Verdean, or at least I don’t think.

    I hear words like “manjar (to eat)” (I’m hearing a lot of words with last-syllable stress, and I’m guessing a good number of these are the root verb forms where the final -r sound has been dropped as it happens in some Romance languages/dialects/creoles); “questa (this)” (the s is like sh in ship, as would be pronounced in Portuguese); and maybe “pena”(?) at the very end.

    Wish the audio quality were better.

  16. A.J.P. Crown says:

    If even David Marjanović doesn’t know, then how do you expect me to?

    I agree with Doug.

    How about a Brazilian, normally a Portuguese-speaker, speaking in, say, one of those things David suggested?

  17. Peter J. Franke says:

    Is it Roma?

  18. renato figueiredo says:

    Crown, surely it isn’t Brazilian Portuguese (I’m Brazilian) it isn’t also spanish, nor italian, nor French.
    Sometimes it looks like Esperanto and any creole language, similar to Papiamento. But I wouldn’t say it is Papiamento, I have many doubts.

  19. Jim Morrison says:

    I think this is some sort of language spoken in Italy (maybe Piedmontese).
    I am sure I can hear some romance features:

    ‘Leger’ – light??
    ‘Tots dus’ – like Catalan (both) ??
    ‘Manjar’ – to eat??

    Its an interesting one!
    Jim

  20. michael farris says:

    I’m gonna take a wild guess ….. Ido?

  21. michael farris says:

    A second, less wild, guess …. Asturian?

  22. Aron says:

    I’m narrowing my guess to a Swiss dialect. Oh what the heck, Surselvan?

  23. Grumbly Stu says:

    “Singsong quality”? “Wish the audio quality were better”? Sounds to me like something being played backwards.

  24. HP says:

    I have another guess: Macanese, aka Patuá.

  25. Simon says:

    Interesting guesses – the language is Rumantsch Grischun which is spoken in the Swiss Canton of Grischun/Grigione/Grissons/Graubünden.

    The recording comes from Lowlands-L, and is part of a story called “Il poleschet” (The Wren).

    Here’s the text:

    Il poleschet

    Il poleschet aveva ses gnieu en la remisa dals chars. In di, ils vegls tuts dus han orsgulà – vulevan prender insatge per mangiar per lur giuvens – ed avevan laschà ils pitschens sul sulet.

    Suenter ina urella, il bab poleschet returna a chasa.

    “Tge è passà, uffants?”, el di. “Tgi va ha fatg questa chaussa dal mal? Tuts avais bler tema!”

    and an English version:

    The Wren

    There once was a wren who had made his nest in a garage. He lived there with his family. One day he and his mate went out to look for some food to bring their chicks, leaving the young birds all alone.

    After a while the father wren returned home.

    “What’s been going on here?” he asked. “Has something happened? You children look scared to death!”

  26. Babe Videos says:

    English isnt my first language but you made me understand clearly, thank you.