Khahabran Khahabran

The Khahabran alphabet was created by David Hunt (kennymimi@bellsouth.net) in order to write Makharian, a constructed language inspired by Latin and Turkish. The Eastern feel of the alphabet is meant to be reminiscent of the Byzantine Empire where David's own Makhar Empire is based.

Internal history

The language is a branch of the Makharian limb of the Sethrë language group, the most common of the Anyarë tongues. Khahabran is the informal tongue of the Makhar Empire, a lingua franca of sorts, Makharian being the formal speech, the lingua nobis. Created by the scholar Arhamidel al-Vyryk, Emperor Geminnius XVIII declared it the official alphabet in the year 1523 of the Second Dynasty. The New Khahabran Alphabet replaced the old ideograms of the Auric languages, which was difficult to master and cumbersome to write. The alphabet was, surprisingly, built around the old ideograms, which had also had a phonetic alphabet in order to easily translate other languages.

Notable features

  • The Khahabran alphabet is written vertically from top to bottom and from left to right.
  • It can be used to write a multitude of languages.
  • The alphabet is quite suitable for calligraphy; it can be written using a brush or pen.
  • The alphabet is built around vowels. Every letter is built around seven forms; single letter, letter + A, letter + E, letter + I, letter + O, letter + U, and letter + Y. This makes it a pseudo-syllabic alphabet, though Makharian can be classified as an abjad.

Khahabran alphabet

Khahabran alphabet
Khahabran alphabet
Khahabran punctuation

Other writing systems invented by visitors to this site