Kana system for foreign languages

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Kana system for foreign languages

Postby Alisbet » Sat 17 Mar 2012 4:47 pm

This thread is about a new system of Japanese Kana modified in order to write other languages. It uses katakana only and besides syllables already found in Japanese, it also has extra syllables that are generally written using hiragana letters modified to look like katakana letters. Even solitary consonants (N included) are written using their respective A syllables take from hiragana.

Aside from these extra letters, writing is somewhat same as standard Japanese except it does not use Kanji and double consonants are marked by a special punctuation mark put under the letter in question that resembles a backwards L. That is, a simple horizontal line that extends upwards at the right side of the letter. Double vowels are marked by a simple line next to the letter just as normal Kana does. The first letter of the sentence is also marked by a special punctuation mark that also defines the direction the sentence is to be read. Letters with diacritics are usually formed by connecting 2 letter together to form the letter in question. For instance, the letter Ä is A and E put together by a conjoining line.

And that is the basics of this system. I would like to hear your opinions.
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Alisbet
 
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Re: Kana system for foreign languages

Postby Alisbet » Sun 24 Jun 2012 6:05 pm

Alright, now it's my time to explain this system in more detail. Besides facilitating the use of Kana of foreign languages, it also fixes up some inconsistencies in the Japanese Language itself and makes it more accessible. For example, this system adds characters for syllables that doesn't have characters of their own. These mainly takes on two forms. One method is to flip a whole or parts of existing characters and the other method is to convert an existing character from Katakana to Hiragana and vice versa. Examples of flipping include handakuten forms of the H-set syllables. Examples of the conversion method include solitary consonants that besides the N are converted version of the existing A syllables with the addition of dakuten when necessary. The mark indicating double consonants are also used here.
Power of People is stronger than People in Power.
Alisbet
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun 30 May 2010 5:07 pm
Location: Finland


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