Kay's Conlanging Questions

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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby Alex » Mon 09 May 2011 3:23 am

Hiya guys...I need a bit of help. I have been told that it is weird to have auxiliary verbs in conlangs, and have even read it. But I'd really like them, but I'm not sure how to do it...

Here is what I have so far:

Verb Infinitive:
<Wó> (to be)

Examples:
Wó wági - to study
Wó puya - to run/walk
Wó chág - to hunt/fight


ga (present, sing & plural), examples:
Code: Select all
SINGULAR                            PLURAL
am,                   |
are,                  |              are
is,                   |


go (past tense, singular & plural), examples:
Code: Select all
SINGULAR                            PLURAL
was,                   |
were,                  |             were
was,                   |


Does this make sense? If not, what do you guys suggest on how to do this...? :oops:

Thank you for reading,

Kaylee~
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby linguoboy » Mon 09 May 2011 1:55 pm

Kaylee wrote:Hiya guys...I need a bit of help. I have been told that it is weird to have auxiliary verbs in conlangs, and have even read it.

Do you remember where? There's nothing "weird" about auxiliary verbs in the least; a lot of languages make extensive use of them.

Kaylee wrote:Here is what I have so far:

Verb Infinitive:
<Wó> (to be)

Examples:
Wó wági - to study
Wó puya - to run/walk
Wó chág - to hunt/fight

So wági, puya, and chág all represent participles of some sort or another? If so, then it all makes sense to me so far.
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby Alex » Tue 10 May 2011 12:15 am

linguoboy wrote:Do you remember where? There's nothing "weird" about auxiliary verbs in the least; a lot of languages make extensive use of them.


On an anime forum a week or so ago. There was a discussion thread for Conlangs and I brought it up to them. Two of them said it was weird to have them in Conlangs because they only exist in real languages :(

linguoboy wrote:So wági, puya, and chág all represent participles of some sort or another? If so, then it all makes sense to me so far.

What do you mean? :oops:
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby Kietl » Tue 10 May 2011 2:01 am

Kaylee wrote:On an anime forum a week or so ago. There was a discussion thread for Conlangs and I brought it up to them. Two of them said it was weird to have them in Conlangs because they only exist in real languages :(

So, according to them, the point of conlangs is to only use structures not appearing in human languages? What if you're trying to make a conlang spoken by humans? 8-)

As I see it, conlanging is art. The point is to create a language that you want to make, regardless of whether the structures you use are found in "real" languages or not. There's really nothing to say that some structure is "weird", unless you're comparing it to what happens in human language specifically. So have fun with it and don't worry.

Kaylee wrote:
linguoboy wrote:So wági, puya, and chág all represent participles of some sort or another? If so, then it all makes sense to me so far.

What do you mean? :oops:

I think a better question might be this: Is wo a direct equivalent to the English to in infinitives? The confusion stems from the fact that you define wo first as "to be", but then use it in conjunction with other verbs (?) to form infinitives. Would wo wági translate literally as wo "to" wági "study"?

If so, I understand the premise, which is basically the same as English.

Am I hitting the mark here?
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby linguoboy » Tue 10 May 2011 2:47 am

Kaylee wrote:
linguoboy wrote:So wági, puya, and chág all represent participles of some sort or another? If so, then it all makes sense to me so far.

What do you mean? :oops:

A participle is a part of speech with characteristics of both verbs and adjectives. In general, they are not as fully conjugated as verbs. For instance, Latin has six tenses and two voices, but only three participles. But participles can generally do "verby" things that ordinary adjectives can't, such as take direct objects.

When you tell me that the in wó wági means "to be", then I assume this means that wági is participial form equivalent to English "studying". Of course, this assumes that is the same form of "to be" that we be used with "to be fat" or "to be hilarious", which might not be the case.
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby Alex » Tue 10 May 2011 2:55 am

@Kietl & linguoboy:
I don't know, that's why I was confused. They seemed like they knew a lot more than me and had been doing it for a while... :(

Yes, you are correct Kietl. It doesn't directly translate as "to study"...but I made <wó> mean "to be". :oops:
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby Alex » Fri 13 May 2011 11:31 pm

Oh, I think I understand where I goofed up and what you guys mean. :oops:

<wó> does translate as "to be". So "wó águŋ" means "to be sleepy"
<yé> translates as "to". So "yé wági" means "to study".
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby Kietl » Sat 14 May 2011 12:58 am

Kaylee wrote:Oh, I think I understand where I goofed up and what you guys mean. :oops:

<wó> does translate as "to be". So "wó águŋ" means "to be sleepy"
<yé> translates as "to". So "yé wági" means "to study".

Hm, okay. Now riddle me this:

If wó águŋ means "to be sleepy" ("to be in a state of sleepiness"), would wó wági mean "to be studying" ("to be in a state of studying")? If so, this would seem to suggest that words such as águŋ, wági, puya, and chág are adjectival and, in the constructions you've posted, are coupled with a stative verb .

Anywhere close?
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby Alex » Sat 14 May 2011 3:54 am

Oh, no...wó wági wouldn't mean that. :(

I messed something up, huh? :oops:
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Re: Kay's Conlanging Questions

Postby Alex » Fri 20 May 2011 6:59 am

Okay...here is what I have so far. :D

Please share if you think it makes sense or not. :oops:

To form Verb infinitives, it is preceded by "Yé" or "Wó". (which I think I'll change "Wó" to be "Yén"...hmm)
Yé wági = to study
Wó omgá = to be fast

To form "to be sleepy", "to be mingy", "to be jump", "to be creepy", "to be geedy" etc etc, you would do so:

Wó águŋni = to be sleepy
Wó degni = to be jumpy

Or:
omgáni hera = a fast creature/monster
águŋni hera = a sleepy creature/monster
degni hera = a jumpy creature/monster
Méŋkaháni ga’api = a marked/scarred giant

(No syntax has been applied to this; its retaining English syntax :) )

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