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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Mon 25 Apr 2011 12:42 am

Kaylee wrote:So what's the difference from a word and a free Morpheme? :oops:

Because it sounds like words are Morphemes... >.>


Think of the morpheme as the logical unit.
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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby Alex » Mon 25 Apr 2011 3:18 am

@linguoboy:

So its a word, but it can only appear as a part of another word, right...?

@Dan_ad_nauseam:
What do you mean by that? :oops:
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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby linguoboy » Mon 25 Apr 2011 1:16 pm

Kaylee wrote:@linguoboy:

So its a word, but it can only appear as a part of another word, right...?

Attached to but not necessarily part of. "They've" is still really two words (which is why we write it the way we do), it's just that one of them is in an abbreviated form that can't appear on it's own. You can't say *"'Ve they gone?" even though there's no real difference in meaning between have and 've.

This is a very different case from, for instance, the -hood in brotherhood or the -ian in Canadian.
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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Wed 27 Apr 2011 6:13 am

Kaylee wrote:. . . .

@Dan_ad_nauseam:
What do you mean by that? :oops:


One way to identify a morpheme is to ask if it adds logical meaning.
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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby linguoboy » Wed 27 Apr 2011 10:00 pm

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
Kaylee wrote:. . . .

@Dan_ad_nauseam:
What do you mean by that? :oops:

One way to identify a morpheme is to ask if it adds logical meaning.

I'm afraid I don't understand what definition of "logical" you're using here. Is it possible to add "illogical meaning" to something?
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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby dtp883 » Thu 28 Apr 2011 7:03 am

Dan_ad_naseum, that's a pretty good rule, but one has to be careful.

Exception:
Flammable indicates something is easily set fire. "in"+"flammable"="inflammable" Inflammable means something easily set fire to. So, in=?
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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Fri 29 Apr 2011 5:10 am

dtp883 wrote:Dan_ad_naseum, that's a pretty good rule, but one has to be careful.

Exception:
Flammable indicates something is easily set fire. "in"+"flammable"="inflammable" Inflammable means something easily set fire to. So, in=?


If parsed in the order:

In- + flame -> inflame
Inflame + able -> inflammable

In-'s status as a morpheme can be identified.
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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Fri 29 Apr 2011 5:13 am

linguoboy wrote:
Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
Kaylee wrote:. . . .

@Dan_ad_nauseam:
What do you mean by that? :oops:

One way to identify a morpheme is to ask if it adds logical meaning.

I'm afraid I don't understand what definition of "logical" you're using here. Is it possible to add "illogical meaning" to something?


An example would be the "il" in "illogical."

In- + logical -> illogical (/n/ changing to /l/ for phonetic reasons)

"In-" adds the meaning "not."
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Re: Hiya forum!

Postby linguoboy » Fri 29 Apr 2011 5:28 am

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:One way to identify a morpheme is to ask if it adds logical meaning.

I'm afraid I don't understand what definition of "logical" you're using here. Is it possible to add "illogical meaning" to something?


An example would be the "il" in "illogical."

In- + logical -> illogical (/n/ changing to /l/ for phonetic reasons)

"In-" adds the meaning "not."

But take an example like Spanish lógico "logical" > lógica "logical". What "logical meaning" has been "added" here? And if none has, then what status does -o/-a have in these words?
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