Clearscript

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Clearscript

Postby Snarfangel » Fri 18 Feb 2011 2:42 pm

Here is a script to introduce myself (I am a brand new person on the board).

This is a constructed script for English that I call Clearscript -- more of a reference to Kingsley Read's Quikscript than bragging, honest! :lol: Like the Read alphabet, unvoiced consonants are tall, voiced consonants are deep, and vowels are short (height-wise, not in sound duration). In addition, plosives all have one or more loops, fricatives have intersections of two segments, nasals have rotational symmetry, and rounded vowels are, well, rounded.

That sounds complicated (and I added some other features to the aesthetic mix), so here are pictures. Above each symbol is the closest I could come to describing the isolated sound, either in IPA or the Latin alphabet, while below each symbol is a word containing the sound. (The /ch/ in loch and the glottal stop -- 3 and 8 respectively -- aren't often used, but I thought I'd add them anyway). More info is in the file comment above each picture.

Fair warning, I am not much of a font designer!
Attachments
conlangtest1.GIF
Top: Clearscript in its own script. Notice the naming dot below the first letter.
Following three rows: vowels, unvoiced consonants, voiced consonants.
conlangtest1.GIF (21.17 KiB) Viewed 5902 times
phonalph1.GIF
The symbols placed on an IPA diagram.
phonalph1.GIF (49.72 KiB) Viewed 5902 times
LEDAlphabet.GIF
And just to give an idea of how the shapes of the letters was chosen: 7-segment numeric displays, like those used in LEDs:
LEDAlphabet.GIF (5.45 KiB) Viewed 5902 times
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Re: Clearscript

Postby gnunix » Fri 18 Feb 2011 4:00 pm

I like the idea of voiced consonants being upside down unvoiced consonants.
But I also have to little points of criticism, both concerning the title.
First you used the wrong vowel at clear. And the s is a little bit too far going down. It doesn't match the baseline, though it should as shown in your table.
So just some minor criticism. I really like the design. Keep on the good work.

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Re: Clearscript

Postby Snarfangel » Fri 18 Feb 2011 7:32 pm

gnunix wrote:I like the idea of voiced consonants being upside down unvoiced consonants.
But I also have to little points of criticism, both concerning the title.
First you used the wrong vowel at clear. And the s is a little bit too far going down. It doesn't match the baseline, though it should as shown in your table.
So just some minor criticism. I really like the design. Keep on the good work.

E: Ah and before I forget. Welcome to the forum



To be honest, I have a harder time distinguishing vowels from each other by ear than I do consonants, so I did a Google search for "phonetic translator," and used the first result (upodn.com/phon.asp). It translated "clear script" as "klɪr skrɪpt," so I used that, even though it sounded like a long e to me. I would be happy to adjust it with a better phonetic version. (It's going to be really fun trying to translate the universal declaration of human rights passage!)

The second point is well taken. I copied/pasted from the alphabet to the name. The heights were slightly off, and trying to adjust the size of the s made things look even worse. (I really wish I were more of an artist!) Time to break out the Microsoft Paint!

And thanks for the welcome!
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Re: Clearscript

Postby dranorter » Sun 20 Feb 2011 6:00 am

New here myself :B the LED versions make me happy, the other ones *shrug*... as you say you are not much of a font designer, and I'm sure they'd look fairly pleasant (and clear) scrawled across the page. Have you tried much writing with them?

I also like the dots system, any other neat math conventions? :)

Gnunix, the voiced/voiceless pairing is originally from Shavian. There are a good number of alternative English orthographies descended from Shavian, whose letterforms are borrowed in part from shorthand.

Personally I think such pairings are convenient for a (hobby-)linguist learning a new system, but might confuse people if the system were tried on a wider population. When rotational rules are pointed out to kids trying to learn the Cree syllabary (vowel is indicated by rotation) it can slow down their progress (don't remember where I read this), and really the mind prefers to think of voiced and unvoiced consonants as totally separate, associating this in pairs is a learned skill.
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Doubled post

Postby Snarfangel » Sun 20 Feb 2011 5:14 pm

Accidentally doubled my post.
Last edited by Snarfangel on Sun 20 Feb 2011 5:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Clearscript

Postby Snarfangel » Sun 20 Feb 2011 5:20 pm

dranorter wrote:New here myself :B the LED versions make me happy, the other ones *shrug*... as you say you are not much of a font designer, and I'm sure they'd look fairly pleasant (and clear) scrawled across the page. Have you tried much writing with them?


I've done a bit of writing with it. It's about like block printing (I haven't come up with a logical way of making a cursive form, at least not yet). The hardest part is converting English words to some sort of phonetic pronunciation in my head. I've gone back to little notes I've scribbled out, and I can read them again, despite my poor handwriting, which is more than I can sometimes do with my normal scrawl.

dranorter wrote:I also like the dots system, any other neat math conventions? :)


Not yet. I liked the idea of numbers and words being related -- there's a reason companies with 1-800 numbers like the 7 digits to be related to a word on the touchpad. It really makes it easier to remember. Making a word into a number by putting a dot in front of it was an easy way to accomplish it.

On a somewhat related note, I've also played around with different number bases. Like others with such interests, I initially looked at duodecimal and really like it, but to be honest I actually like senary (base 6) better, since primes in that notation all end in 1 or 5, and multiples of 1/5 and 1/7 have a more elegant representation after the radix point. As a further complication (or in many respects, simplification), I also like balanced notation (in case you are unfamiliar with that, here's a Wikipedia article on balanced ternary that should give an idea: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balanced_ternary ).

I know people's eyes are starting to glaze over at this point, but just to complete the process (grin), I came up with an idea for balanced senary notation as well. There are symbols for the integers between -3 and 3 -- (-3), (-2), (-1), (0), (1), (2), (3) -- and a few simple rules, and you get a number system where rounding and truncation are equivalent (and it's the cool kind of rounding known as unbiased rounding or "round half to even").

Getting back to Clearscript, it has 37 symbols, and balanced base-36 (alphadecimal) requires 37 characters. Base 36 can be considered a more compact written form of base 6, which gets back to my favorite number base.

dranorter wrote:
Gnunix, the voiced/voiceless pairing is originally from Shavian. There are a good number of alternative English orthographies descended from Shavian, whose letterforms are borrowed in part from shorthand.

Personally I think such pairings are convenient for a (hobby-)linguist learning a new system, but might confuse people if the system were tried on a wider population. When rotational rules are pointed out to kids trying to learn the Cree syllabary (vowel is indicated by rotation) it can slow down their progress (don't remember where I read this), and really the mind prefers to think of voiced and unvoiced consonants as totally separate, associating this in pairs is a learned skill.


You might be right on the confusion part. I didn't notice it, but that's probably because I was trying to figure out how to fit everything together, and the effort of doing that might have masked the other. I originally wanted to make all voiced consonants have a line above or a line below the unvoiced version (I still might try that at some point), but I like this pretty well. To be honest, part of the reason I chose it is because it opens up the possibility for amusing wordplay -- compared to English, a lot more words and phrases should be readable in normal orientation, and say something completely different when flipped upside down. :)

Since you mentioned the LED versions, I think I might post how I picked them. It's really simple, but fun to see.
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Re: Clearscript

Postby Serali » Thu 24 Feb 2011 2:00 pm

LOVE IT!

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Re: Clearscript

Postby Eden » Fri 06 Apr 2012 4:49 am

I'm think you might be missing the /aɪ/ sound, like in the word bite, or pie, and the /aʊ/ sound like in the word mouth.
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Re: Clearscript

Postby linguoboy » Fri 06 Apr 2012 5:34 pm

Eden wrote:I'm think you might be missing the /aɪ/ sound, like in the word bite, or pie, and the /aʊ/ sound like in the word mouth.

Those are called diphthongs. They can be treated as sequences of two sounds (as, indeed, you've done in your transcription) and represented graphically as such. (English is actually anomalous among languages of the world in using a single character for /ai/ in the vast majority of cases.)
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Re: Clearscript

Postby Eden » Wed 09 May 2012 11:44 pm

I started learning this script awhile ago and now I absolutely love it. I even keep a journal which I've written completely using this script. So I just wanted to say good work!
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