My first conlanguage: Ethonese

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My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby LackOfFuel » Fri 03 Dec 2010 3:48 pm

Hy!

I believe, this is my first post like that on this forum. I decided to make this conlanguage entirely for fun, so don't excpect brilliant new language, because it is probably not so good.
Oh, and - don't be short with your comments. It's always good to see the mistake you've made, so you wouldn't do it again.
Oh, and I don't know how to really name my language. I don't want to come up with some strange name, so ... :lol: (You can call it Ethonese - Ätonäss for the beginning ; - ))

First - the alphabet. I've tried to be as precise as I could with IPA symbols, but I don't think I've got it all right. So please correct me, if you notice any mistake.

A ɑː(in the alphabet) a
Ä æ, pronounced ə at the end of the word.
B b
C ts, in the middle of a word it should be read as s. Although, there are some exceptions (like word doctör, where we read c as "k"
D d
E ə
Ë
F f
G g
H h
I ɪ
J j
K k
L l
M m
N n
O ɒ
Ö Can be read as œ, ø, sometimes even as (etc.) , like it should be pronounced in alphabet.

Ő It should be always read as œ, even in alphabet
P p
R r
S s
SS ɕ
Ş ʃ
T t, θ
U
Ü y
V v
W w
Y
Z z

Note, that G is pronounced as ʑ in the middle of the word between two vowels. Otherwise, it should be pronounced normally (g[i])
ZH is pronounced [i]ʒ
.
S is pronounced ʃ in the middle of the word.
So Ş is only used at the beginning or at the end of the word.
EI should be always pronounced as .
E should be alwas pronounced as æ at the end of the word.
E should always be pronounced as ə in the middle or at the beginning of the word, except when this is E with acute accent (É) or E with grave accent (È).
TT should always be pronounced t
T should be pronounced θ in the middle of the word.

I think that's all for now. I will add more things later, in case I've forgotten anything.
__________________________________________________________________________________

Now, this is mostly SOV language, so the sentence "I eat apples" (Or I'm eating apples) would look like this:

Köl äffelén kättoş
(Köl (I) shoud be read as "køːl")
(I apples eat )

Now, verbs. Each verb has a various type of forms. For instance, verb "to eat":

1.INFINITIVE: vekätt or kätt (we should use prefix VE only when the infinitive form of a verb is used in sentence)

2.Now take a look at these sentences:

I'm eating an apple (or I eat apple :) ):

Köl äffel kättoş or Äffel kättoş.. (We usually keep the subject in the sentence, so this is actually some kind of "irregular sentence". We use these sentences when we want to say, we actually don't like eating apples, but we must eat this one.

In this case, the prefix "ve" was first taken away, then we've used the suffix -oş.

b) We are eating apples.

Kwöl kättose

- Note the suffix -ose (-oʃæ). In this case, we use -s instead of -ş, because we shoud only use -ş at the end or at the beginning of the word

3..Now, the second sentence:

You (SG.) are eating apple (or you eat apple ... I know, it's strange )

Tan äffel kättiş.

-Note the suffix - iş

3. You (PL.) are eating apples.

Bät äffelén kättise.

-Note the suffix -ise.

4. She/He is eating apple.

Tém äffel kättaş.

-Note the suffix -aş

5. They (FEM. or MASC.) are eating apples.

Téş/Tiş äffelén kättase

-Note the suffix -ase.

Of course, there are some "special verbs", like verb to be (dë). For example, you don't have to use prefix "VE" if you want to say or write infinitive form of verb be.

So, here it is:

INFINITIVE: Dë

I am - Köl im (short - Kim) We are - Kwöl vé (short: Kvé)("Kw" should be pronounced as "kv" and ö "øː".)

You (SG.) are: Tan atë You (PL.) are - Bät mie ( short - Bie)

He/She is - Tim/Tém éppe

They (MASC, FEM.) are - Tiş/Téş värt

Normal sentence would look like that:

We are doctors -

Kwöl doctöraş vé.

But if we want to say this sentence with short form of "We are" it should look like this:

Doctöraş kvé.

This is, unless I'm not very much mistaken, OSV sentence. But these short forms are rarely used.


This is example written in Ethonese:

Nie frőnd mröt sagikë, opp mröt unnvikë. Köl trät jägeresät veminnd. Kél, köl trütt binndkoldoş. (link)

I'll add more things later, I'm currently short with time. Please, feel free to give your honest opinion about this creation of mine. :lol:
Last edited by LackOfFuel on Fri 03 Dec 2010 4:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Ponavadi ni v moji navadi, da govorim nenavadno o nenavadno nenavadnih navadah. :P


I usually don't speak unusually about unusually unusual habits. :P
LackOfFuel
 
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Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby linguoboy » Fri 03 Dec 2010 4:24 pm

LackOfFuel wrote:But if we want to say this sentence with short form of "We are" it should look like this:

Doctöraş kvé.

This is, unless I'm not very much mistaken, OVS sentence.

Since k represents an abbreviated form of the subject pronoun kwöl, I would call this OSV.
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Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby LackOfFuel » Fri 03 Dec 2010 4:39 pm

Of course, you're right. Thank you for correcting me.

EDIT: I didn't mention that O can be pronounced as "o" or "ɒ". It depends on the way you read the word - but usually ɒ is used before N (like ON).
Ponavadi ni v moji navadi, da govorim nenavadno o nenavadno nenavadnih navadah. :P


I usually don't speak unusually about unusually unusual habits. :P
LackOfFuel
 
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Joined: Fri 10 Sep 2010 5:00 am

Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby linguoboy » Fri 03 Dec 2010 9:25 pm

LackOfFuel wrote:EDIT: I didn't mention that O can be pronounced as "o" or "ɒ". It depends on the way you read the word - but usually ɒ is used before N (like ON).

I know it's a lot more work, but I wouldn't mind seeing some of these alternations phrased as phonological rules rather than orthographic ones. That is, is the pronunciation of o as [ɒ] before n just some quirk in the representation of /ɒ/ or is there an underlying rule that lowers /o/ before /n/?

(If you don't understand what I mean here, I'm more than happy to elabourate.)
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Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby LackOfFuel » Sat 04 Dec 2010 10:05 am

Hm, you're probably right, these rules are ortographic more than phonological. I'll try to fix that, but I don't think I will be pretty succesful with it. There is not really "good rule" in why shouldn't we read G as "g" between two vowels, neither there isn't special phonological rule why should we read ɒ instead of o before n.
Thank you for your help! I really appreciate it. ;)
Ponavadi ni v moji navadi, da govorim nenavadno o nenavadno nenavadnih navadah. :P


I usually don't speak unusually about unusually unusual habits. :P
LackOfFuel
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri 10 Sep 2010 5:00 am

Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby linguoboy » Sat 04 Dec 2010 4:44 pm

LackOfFuel wrote:Hm, you're probably right, these rules are ortographic more than phonological. I'll try to fix that, but I don't think I will be pretty succesful with it. There is not really "good rule" in why shouldn't we read G as "g" between two vowels, neither there isn't special phonological rule why should we read ɒ instead of o before n.

"g → ʑ | V_V" is a perfectly good rule, as is "o → ɒ | _n". I can see, though, that if you're still creating vocabulary, you may not want to limit yourself until you know what the final distribution of sounds will be. But you can always revise the rules, or add new ones as necessary. For instance, if you realise later that you do want [o] before [n], instead of junking the rule above, you could always add another, e.g. "u → o | _n". (Which only works if you don't want to have [un]. But since you don't even have a way of writing [u], this shouldn't be an issue!)
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Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby LackOfFuel » Sat 04 Dec 2010 8:16 pm

OK. About U ... the mess I've made in my previous posts ... there should be only u instead of (I knew I had done something wrong with that IPA :D) , I don't know what I was thinking, Anyway, thank you. Your comments shore will help me, I just need to find some more time to think about the thing and continue with writing (I've already constructed past tense forms of verbs, so I will probably post that thing soon).

And others? What do you think about this language of mine? Do you like the general idea of creating language like this, or perhaps not? I know, there's a lot of mistakes ... probably not the best start, but still ... ? :oops:
Ponavadi ni v moji navadi, da govorim nenavadno o nenavadno nenavadnih navadah. :P


I usually don't speak unusually about unusually unusual habits. :P
LackOfFuel
 
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Joined: Fri 10 Sep 2010 5:00 am

Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby LackOfFuel » Sun 05 Dec 2010 12:47 pm

MAKING PLURAL

We can make plural on many ways, it depends on the gender of noun. But there are some exceptions as well.

For example, we can take the noun, äffel (apple, obviously):

äffel - äffelén (apple - apples)

Apple is female-gender noun. Every noun, which ends with EL, AL or IL (also - EM, AM, IM) is feminine gender. And, every noun which ends with vowel is feminine gender too (still, there are some exceptions, like Radio. These exceptions are mostly loanwords)

Now, try to make plural with noun tasilä (bird):

tasilä --> tasiläss

-Note the suffix -SS . Bird is feminine gender noun.

NOUN: Şäffän (horse) :

Şäffän --> Şäffäne (horses)

-Note the suffix -E.
- Şäffän is masculine gender noun.

NOUN: Doctör (doctor, obviously)

Doctör---> Doctöraş

-Doctor is a masculine gender noun.
-Note the suffix -aş

NOUN: Onnol (cloud)

Onnol - Onnolaş

-Note the suffix -aş

If masculine-gender noun ends with -L or -R, we should make plural with suffix - aş.
If masculine gender noun ends with vowel (for example, radio) it should be pluralized with -L:

Radio - Radiol (Radios)

There are even some neuter gender nouns (I believe it's called neuter, right? ). For example, all
emotions are neuter-gender nouns. These nouns can be pluralized with - ON or -NON

Eji - fear --> Ejinon - fears (phobias)

In the next post I will present you Past and Future tenses, as well as possesive pronouns.

Enjoy!
Ponavadi ni v moji navadi, da govorim nenavadno o nenavadno nenavadnih navadah. :P


I usually don't speak unusually about unusually unusual habits. :P
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Posts: 19
Joined: Fri 10 Sep 2010 5:00 am

Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby linguoboy » Sun 05 Dec 2010 3:27 pm

LackOfFuel wrote:There are even some neuter gender nouns (I believe it's called neuter, right? ).

How do we know there is a neuter gender? You've only presented masculine and feminine pronouns (i.e. tim/tém and tişt/téş).
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Re: My first conlanguage: Ethonese

Postby LackOfFuel » Sun 05 Dec 2010 4:23 pm

Yeah, it's a bit of confusing without pronoun "IT". I thought first, there should be used only the masculine pronoun - Tim. But I guess it's really confusing. So here are two new words for pronouns "IT" and "THEY (neuter)" - Tum/Tuş .
Oh, and one more thing. Only emotions are neuter gender. Nothing else, because there is no rule, which would make one noun neuter.
Ponavadi ni v moji navadi, da govorim nenavadno o nenavadno nenavadnih navadah. :P


I usually don't speak unusually about unusually unusual habits. :P
LackOfFuel
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri 10 Sep 2010 5:00 am


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