First conlang troubleshooting

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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby Jarhead » Mon 04 Oct 2010 10:25 pm

linguoboy wrote:
Jarhead wrote:Did you find my links of any help?

Oh, I know what modern Irish sounds like--I speak it myself. But you said were "in love with the sound of what I think is ancient irish". And that's what has me intrigued, since there are no recordings of "ancient Irish". So where do you get your notion of what it sounded like?

I thought it was ancient Irish, instead it's modern. Is that such a terrible option to contemplate? As I crearly stated, the sound of what I THINK is ancient irish. I just got wrong. Are you here to troll or to help me? I'm sure you can leave this thread if you don't find users that suit your tastes.
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby linguoboy » Mon 04 Oct 2010 10:43 pm

Jarhead wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Jarhead wrote:Did you find my links of any help?

Oh, I know what modern Irish sounds like--I speak it myself. But you said were "in love with the sound of what I think is ancient irish". And that's what has me intrigued, since there are no recordings of "ancient Irish". So where do you get your notion of what it sounded like?

I thought it was ancient Irish, instead it's modern. Is that such a terrible option to contemplate? As I crearly stated, the sound of what I THINK is ancient irish. I just got wrong. Are you here to troll or to help me? I'm sure you can leave this thread if you don't find users that suit your tastes.

There's no reason to get defensive. I'm just trying to understand what you mean.
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby Jarhead » Tue 05 Oct 2010 4:26 pm

linguoboy wrote:There's no reason to get defensive. I'm just trying to understand what you mean.
Yeah, thanks for the effort then. You really helped me noticing how much I was wrong. Now I think we can move on...
Since you speak irish you could probably help me with my phonology dilemma.
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby linguoboy » Tue 05 Oct 2010 5:11 pm

Jarhead wrote:Since you speak irish you could probably help me with my phonology dilemma.

I'm not sure I can. That's why I was asking the questions I was, to try and pinpoint what exactly it is about Irish you find attractive. Originally, you bracketed it together with Old Norse (the language of the Vikings) and other "Northern Languages". But I don't think the languages of Northern Europe have much in common in terms of their phonology. In particular, Irish distinguishes palatalised and velarised versions of all its consonants--a feature it has in common with Russian, but not with any of the other languages spoken in-between. To me, this contrast (and the on- and off-glides that result from it) are the single most characteristic feature of Irish pronunciation.
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby Jarhead » Tue 05 Oct 2010 8:57 pm

Sweet! Do you happen to have any recording of Old Norse?
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby linguoboy » Tue 05 Oct 2010 9:16 pm

Jarhead wrote:Sweet! Do you happen to have any recording of Old Norse?

Modern Icelandic will give you some feel for the sound of Old Norse. The pronunciation has changed considerably over the years, but there are still more similarities than differences.

There's an excellent site for learners of Old Norse which does include a few sound samples. I can't vouch personally for their accuracy.
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby Jarhead » Tue 05 Oct 2010 10:25 pm

Thanks! I'm sure its eventual inaccuracy will not emerge due to my shallow knowledge of icelandic.
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby Kloiten » Wed 06 Oct 2010 6:10 am

Jarhead wrote:Thanks for the reply Kloiten ;) I would love to try to buil phonological rules instead of just writing down all the syllabes I like, but I don't think I have sufficent knowledge...


Oh, it's not difficult! You just have to, for starters, find a consonant and the vowels that sound good with it for you. For instance, I made it a rule in my language that [E] and [i] (and such "front vowels") don't follow [k] because I found the pairings to be unattractive.
Then you can complicate the rules and make exceptions such as "front vowels may follow [k] when adjacent to a nasal sound".
If you know what you want, you can make it work with a bit of... uh, work.
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby Jarhead » Wed 06 Oct 2010 3:11 pm

Ah! Well explained it looks a bit easier to a beginner. Thanks again, I'll try that out.
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Re: First conlang troubleshooting

Postby Jarhead » Mon 11 Oct 2010 9:51 pm

Hi there! Anybody wants to give a comment about how the first draft of "Eil" sounds?
This sentence is the first I write and it means: "A group of hunters moves in the wood: they're hunting a deer, because they have no more food at home. Their wives wait them at home."
In Eil: Oddìgear òrgan doréang: oddìgann aichért, om tigàchan ott ferégg. Aen fearach igachan eac ott.
Reading instructions: Stressed vowels are marked. ch is IPA /ç/. Vowels are pronounced like they are in italian or spanish. g is always IPA /g/.
Thanks for reading :)

P.S. I know I totally drifted away from my original euphony project T_T
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