Manna

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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Fri 23 Jul 2010 3:38 pm

dtp883 wrote:You rarely offer proof. :lol:

Just because a group of related ideas have words with similar consonants, doesn't mean that they evolved from some far out cultural symbols—especially from symbols important to cultures one, two, or three civilizations away.

For clarification, you believe that the word for what we call peas originates from a Near East culture, that considered peas to be bird dung (pee), and that word was taken from this culture's language, into Greek, then into Latin, and into Old English as pease and made singular by being changed to pea. This word just happened to sound similar to the word piss which came from French, most likely after 1066, which came from Vulgar Latin and is most likely Germanic. Because of this homophonic (sp?) coincidence, English holds this same, supposed, symbology. Right?

Piss onomonopoetically represents urinating. The French did not suddenly realize, in 1066, that piss sounded like urinating. It is one of the most ancient of words and Greek speakers have decided they created it.

Not only do I have homophonic coincidence but proof of (a) edible bean held in high regard translated as "Dove's Droppings" (b) Cicer = son of Dove (chick) (c) piss however you want to spell it is the root of pisen and pisen is plural of piss.

English does not have same symbology. You know it and are throwing red herring.
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Re: Manna

Postby dtp883 » Fri 23 Jul 2010 11:26 pm

falasha wrote:Piss onomonopoetically represents urinating. The French did not suddenly realize, in 1066, that piss sounded like urinating. It is one of the most ancient of words and Greek speakers have decided they created it.

I said the French introduced it to English. After 1066, because that's the date of the Norman Invasion, the transfer of thousands of French/Vulgar Latin/Latin words to English, and the beginning of Middle English. And while the Greeks may have robbed another culture of the word pison, it's not related to the Germanic or Vulgar Latin piss(iare).

Not only do I have homophonic coincidence but proof of (a) edible bean held in high regard translated as "Dove's Droppings" (b) Cicer = son of Dove (chick) (c) piss however you want to spell it is the root of pisen and pisen is plural of piss.

Uh, I don't think you can have a coincidence. :D The only thing I could find on cicer was the famous roman Cicero, and that cicer means chickpea. I also know now that it's not related to the Latin word for dove, columba. I do not know what you are trying to say with (c).

English does not have same symbology. You know it and are throwing red herring.

What have you been trying to prove to us then?
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Re: Manna

Postby Talib » Sat 24 Jul 2010 4:42 am

For clarification, you believe that the word for what we call peas originates from a Near East culture, that considered peas to be bird dung (pee), and that word was taken from this culture's language, into Greek, then into Latin, and into Old English as pease and made singular by being changed to pea.
Two quick points:

- Dung is not urine. The only thing that have in common is that they're both forms of excrement. This is what makes this argument so specious.
- Pease is Middle English.
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Re: Manna

Postby dtp883 » Sat 24 Jul 2010 7:55 am

Talib wrote:quick points:

- Dung is not urine. The only thing that have in common is that they're both forms of excrement. This is what makes this argument so specious.

-Haha, I know, but he was saying they were interchangeable earlier. (Actually, birds urinate and defecate at the same time, out of the same orifice.)
- Pease is Middle English.

Oh yes, I meant came into Old English as Pise or Piose and became M. English pease. Skipped a step. :roll:
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Re: Manna

Postby Talib » Sat 24 Jul 2010 10:08 am

Haha, I know, but he was saying they were interchangeable earlier. (Actually, birds urinate and defecate at the same time, out of the same orifice.)
Did the ancients know this?
Oh yes, I meant came into Old English as Pise or Piose and became M. English pease. Skipped a step. :roll:
Peose. I take it that's the form that became pease.
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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Sun 25 Jul 2010 6:50 pm

"Uh, I don't think you can have a coincidence. The only thing I could find on cicer was the famous roman Cicero, and that cicer means chickpea. I also know now that it's not related to the Latin word for dove, columba. I do not know what you are trying to say with (c)."

Cicer is the symbology used for domesticated birds and is the root for the word "chicken". Sorry you have not been able to follow along. The etymology of Columba is best explained by symbology. You probably think this word was assigned by a higher power. Other words that are cognate to columba are;
columen - principle beam extending along the roof line,
columna - pillar,
columbarium - dove cote.

The root of this word is probably Chaldee "KLYM" which means built to last long, strong, sound. A column is a man-made structure that is strong and built to withstand the elements. The Book of Ruth tells the story of the widow Naomi returning home with her daughter-in-laws, Ruth and Orpah. One daughter left (Orpah which means to "break neck") but the other (Ruth is TOR/Dove spelled left to right) stays with her mother-in-law and supports her by picking up the leftover grain in the fields. The Ruth marries the owner of the field (Boaz which probably means "Pillar") and they have a child (Obed which means "slave"). This myth is saying that doves use man-made objects for habitation and are supported by the leavings of agriculture. The name of dove "columba" reflects this common cultural symbol.
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Re: Manna

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Sun 25 Jul 2010 11:08 pm

falasha wrote:"Uh, I don't think you can have a coincidence. The only thing I could find on cicer was the famous roman Cicero, and that cicer means chickpea. I also know now that it's not related to the Latin word for dove, columba. I do not know what you are trying to say with (c)."

Cicer is the symbology used for domesticated birds and is the root for the word "chicken". Sorry you have not been able to follow along. The etymology of Columba is best explained by symbology. You probably think this word was assigned by a higher power. Other words that are cognate to columba are;
columen - principle beam extending along the roof line,
columna - pillar,
columbarium - dove cote.

The root of this word is probably Chaldee "KLYM" which means built to last long, strong, sound. A column is a man-made structure that is strong and built to withstand the elements. The Book of Ruth tells the story of the widow Naomi returning home with her daughter-in-laws, Ruth and Orpah. One daughter left (Orpah which means to "break neck") but the other (Ruth is TOR/Dove spelled left to right) stays with her mother-in-law and supports her by picking up the leftover grain in the fields. The Ruth marries the owner of the field (Boaz which probably means "Pillar") and they have a child (Obed which means "slave"). This myth is saying that doves use man-made objects for habitation and are supported by the leavings of agriculture. The name of dove "columba" reflects this common cultural symbol.


Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

Please provide.
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Re: Manna

Postby dtp883 » Mon 26 Jul 2010 10:38 am

Uh, no. Chicken, as are most of our barnyard friends, is a word of Germanic origins. Compare, Swedish kyckling, German Küchen, and Dutch kieken with English chicken.

The Hebrew for Dove is Yonah (English Jonah), not Tor, nor Tur, nor Rut(h).
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Re: Manna

Postby linguoboy » Mon 26 Jul 2010 5:23 pm

dtp883 wrote:Uh, no. Chicken, as are most of our barnyard friends, is a word of Germanic origins. Compare, Swedish kyckling, German Küchen, and Dutch kieken with English chicken.

In origin, it is probably a diminutive of cock. So I guess we're back to connecting chickpeas and piss!
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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Mon 26 Jul 2010 6:28 pm

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
falasha wrote:"Uh, I don't think you can have a coincidence. The only thing I could find on cicer was the famous roman Cicero, and that cicer means chickpea. I also know now that it's not related to the Latin word for dove, columba. I do not know what you are trying to say with (c)."

Cicer is the symbology used for domesticated birds and is the root for the word "chicken". Sorry you have not been able to follow along. The etymology of Columba is best explained by symbology. You probably think this word was assigned by a higher power. Other words that are cognate to columba are;
columen - principle beam extending along the roof line,
columna - pillar,
columbarium - dove cote.

The root of this word is probably Chaldee "KLYM" which means built to last long, strong, sound. A column is a man-made structure that is strong and built to withstand the elements. The Book of Ruth tells the story of the widow Naomi returning home with her daughter-in-laws, Ruth and Orpah. One daughter left (Orpah which means to "break neck") but the other (Ruth is TOR/Dove spelled left to right) stays with her mother-in-law and supports her by picking up the leftover grain in the fields. The Ruth marries the owner of the field (Boaz which probably means "Pillar") and they have a child (Obed which means "slave"). This myth is saying that doves use man-made objects for habitation and are supported by the leavings of agriculture. The name of dove "columba" reflects this common cultural symbol.


Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

Please provide.


Please point out the extraordinary claim so I can narrow down my response.
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