Manna

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Re: Manna

Postby linguoboy » Mon 19 Jul 2010 6:45 pm

falasha wrote:I am not familiar with Georgian cultural symbols.

So? You're no more familiar with Egyptian cultural symbols and that hasn't stopped you.
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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Mon 19 Jul 2010 7:25 pm

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
falasha wrote:“I think it's been agreed that symbology (spell checker says that's not a word and offers no alternatives) comes AFTER language is in use.”
A word is made up of sounds that represent common cultural symbols. . . . ."


Sound symbology is a minor feature in the formation of vocabulary.

quote]

"Sound" symbology would be relevant to piss and sound of urinating. Cicer symbology would be Krious representing the southern part of the known world. BTW, chiche is practically identical to chicken in sound and form. Of course, it matters not to Greek speakers if the symbology describes the common name for domesticated bird breeding economy. Greek speakers see no connection between the domestication of Dove in the southern Ethryean providing the symbology for present day domesticated foul. It's just a coincidence that the words are formed alike using the exact same consonants and represent the same god-given fruitfulness. It's as if you all put your fingers in your ears and hum.
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Re: Manna

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Tue 20 Jul 2010 5:58 am

falasha wrote:
"Sound" symbology would be relevant to piss and sound of urinating. Cicer symbology would be Krious representing the southern part of the known world. BTW, chiche is practically identical to chicken in sound and form. Of course, it matters not to Greek speakers if the symbology describes the common name for domesticated bird breeding economy. Greek speakers see no connection between the domestication of Dove in the southern Ethryean providing the symbology for present day domesticated foul. It's just a coincidence that the words are formed alike using the exact same consonants and represent the same god-given fruitfulness. It's as if you all put your fingers in your ears and hum.


You obviously have no idea what sound symbology is. In some languages, certain phonetic patterns are associated with a meaning. This is not the Semitic triliteral, but instead such patterns as an initial <gl> implying shining in many English words.

And where's Brother Maynard off to?
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Re: Manna

Postby Talib » Tue 20 Jul 2010 8:59 am

"Gloom."
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Re: Manna

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Wed 21 Jul 2010 4:08 am

Talib wrote:"Gloom."


True. Sound symbolism is not consistent within the languages in which it appears.
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Re: Manna

Postby dtp883 » Wed 21 Jul 2010 11:47 am

Gleam, Glisten, Glitter, Glow, Glamor, Glare, Glitz. And in my opinion glacier, glass and glaze.

(I don't know the point of this post, but since the /gl/ referencing light post, I've been trying to think up as many as I could.)
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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Wed 21 Jul 2010 4:40 pm

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
falasha wrote:
"Sound" symbology would be relevant to piss and sound of urinating. Cicer symbology would be Krious representing the southern part of the known world. BTW, chiche is practically identical to chicken in sound and form. Of course, it matters not to Greek speakers if the symbology describes the common name for domesticated bird breeding economy. Greek speakers see no connection between the domestication of Dove in the southern Ethryean providing the symbology for present day domesticated foul. It's just a coincidence that the words are formed alike using the exact same consonants and represent the same god-given fruitfulness. It's as if you all put your fingers in your ears and hum.


You obviously have no idea what sound symbology is. In some languages, certain phonetic patterns are associated with a meaning. This is not the Semitic triliteral, but instead such patterns as an initial <gl> implying shining in many English words.

And where's Brother Maynard off to?


“Phonetic patterns are associated with meaning.” I agree, that is what I have been saying. GL is used to build words with the meaning of shining because of symbology and not some arbitrary designation by aliens. Greek glossa means tongue and words have been built using that symbology to mean gloss, glossary, glot, etc. Mucus was associated with tongue and words were built like glue, gluten, and gel. N. Europe built the word flame using tongue symbology. Flames are shaped like tongues and are said to “lick” the logs as they are consumed. Words were built using flame symbology such as glisten, glass, glow, glamour and glitter.If you want to know why GL was used for tongue in the Greek you must first gird your loins because you will not like it!
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Re: Manna

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Thu 22 Jul 2010 6:17 am

falasha wrote:
“Phonetic patterns are associated with meaning.” I agree, that is what I have been saying. GL is used to build words with the meaning of shining because of symbology and not some arbitrary designation by aliens. Greek glossa means tongue and words have been built using that symbology to mean gloss, glossary, glot, etc. Mucus was associated with tongue and words were built like glue, gluten, and gel. N. Europe built the word flame using tongue symbology. Flames are shaped like tongues and are said to “lick” the logs as they are consumed. Words were built using flame symbology such as glisten, glass, glow, glamour and glitter.If you want to know why GL was used for tongue in the Greek you must first gird your loins because you will not like it!


You aren't getting my point again. I said that sound singularity was a minor feature. You're blowing it up into the underlying feature of lexical development.

But at least you've progressed from "This isn't right. It isn't even wrong." to "That's wrong."
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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Thu 22 Jul 2010 5:39 pm

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
falasha wrote:
“Phonetic patterns are associated with meaning.” I agree, that is what I have been saying. GL is used to build words with the meaning of shining because of symbology and not some arbitrary designation by aliens. Greek glossa means tongue and words have been built using that symbology to mean gloss, glossary, glot, etc. Mucus was associated with tongue and words were built like glue, gluten, and gel. N. Europe built the word flame using tongue symbology. Flames are shaped like tongues and are said to “lick” the logs as they are consumed. Words were built using flame symbology such as glisten, glass, glow, glamour and glitter.If you want to know why GL was used for tongue in the Greek you must first gird your loins because you will not like it!


You aren't getting my point again. I said that sound singularity was a minor feature. You're blowing it up into the underlying feature of lexical development.

But at least you've progressed from "This isn't right. It isn't even wrong." to "That's wrong."


Why would I accept your point when you offer no proof? You make definitive statements without showing your work. A word's creation (singularity) begins with a thought - not a sound. The brain's operating system is symbols - not sound. Modulated sound is a strategy used to convey thoughts for the economic benefit and safety of the organism but NOT internal functioning.

Each language system has evolved a set of rules that allow common cultural symbols to be manipulated for meaning. Any tribe or clan that generates symbols understood by every member would have an advantage over tribes only using symbols found naturally. Symbols create shortcuts to meaning and builds language. A tribe generating symbols would have more language and more economic opportunities than a tribe with less developed mythological backstory.
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Re: Manna

Postby dtp883 » Fri 23 Jul 2010 11:06 am

You rarely offer proof. :lol:

Just because a group of related ideas have words with similar consonants, doesn't mean that they evolved from some far out cultural symbols—especially from symbols important to cultures one, two, or three civilizations away.

For clarification, you believe that the word for what we call peas originates from a Near East culture, that considered peas to be bird dung (pee), and that word was taken from this culture's language, into Greek, then into Latin, and into Old English as pease and made singular by being changed to pea. This word just happened to sound similar to the word piss which came from French, most likely after 1066, which came from Vulgar Latin and is most likely Germanic. Because of this homophonic (sp?) coincidence, English holds this same, supposed, symbology. Right?
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