Manna

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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Sun 11 Jul 2010 4:00 am

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
falasha wrote:As it turns out (I have a googler too) the root of the word for "peas" - not just Chickpeas but ALL peas - is BIRD DROPPINGS. And it comes from the MOTHER of all peas; Chickpeas. If you are not familiar with chickpeas then you won't understand. Chickpeas fueled the connecting of the world through the Roman Army. It was a very important commodity - WAIT! It was the MOST important commondity, besides water, to ancient man.

It's a shame to waste such top-drawer material here. You should self-publish. Regardless whether this is ingenious trollery or completely wrongheaded sincerity, it deserves a larger audience.


I suspect that when Falasha finishes his book, he should contact Dr. Poonai's publisher. ;-)

After interpreting the symbols in your post, I have concluded;
1) you are the worst kind of sexist human, and
2) you have written a book and have either published it yourself or are trying to get it published.

You don't understand that other people don't have the same motivations as you or even that we are actual people. You see others as tools to be used to your benefit. When you insisted that I did not know the Knights that say NEE were a metaphor, I knew you were a little off.
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Re: Manna

Postby Talib » Sun 11 Jul 2010 5:35 am

1. Cranks overestimate their own knowledge and ability, and underestimate that of acknowledged experts.
2. Cranks insist that their alleged discoveries are urgently important.
3. Cranks rarely, if ever, acknowledge any error, no matter how trivial.
4. Cranks love to talk about their own beliefs, often in inappropriate social situations, but they tend to be bad listeners, and often appear to be uninterested in anyone else's experience or opinions.
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Re: Manna

Postby Delodephius » Sun 11 Jul 2010 9:42 am

All who agree falasha is a crank raise your hand.

Aye!
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Re: Manna

Postby linguoboy » Sun 11 Jul 2010 4:17 pm

Delodephius wrote:All who agree falasha is a crank raise your hand.

Call me a fool, but I'm still clinging to the "inventive troll" theory myself. The Knights Who Say "NEE!" bit was just too over-the-top.
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Re: Manna

Postby dtp883 » Mon 12 Jul 2010 4:44 am

falasha wrote:My GOD you are hardheaded!!!!! Nowhere in your mea culpa did you mention the symbology that is associated with this word.

I think it's been agreed that symbology (spell checker says that's not a word and offers no alternatives) comes AFTER language is in use.
You are just parroting what you have read that was written by a Greek-o-phile.

I can parrot you, "Straw man! Straw man!" You have no idea what those writers believe.

I doubt the authors of a page on peas are "Greek-o-philes" with vendettas against semitic root words. I think it's safe to assume that, when pisos, pisum, and pease, sound the same and mean the same thing, they are related. A word-to-word dictionary translation (i.e. pisos>pease) is about as objective as one can get.

When trying to find the beginning of language a good place to start is the roots of words. However, linguists on this forum don't think the roots are important. The well educated on this forum think it is enough to stop at the Greek/Latin form.

Sometimes that is all that's possible. If Greek adopted the word from some small unwritten regional language that went extinct 2500 years ago, it would be impossible to go back to that root.

You said that piss=peas. Since those words are different in Greek and Latin (and in English too, really), your symbolic connotations wouldn't have existed there and wouldn't have come to English.

Here is a perfect example of a lot of information and very little knowledge.

Pot calling the kettle block or peas calling the broccoli green, you know, whatever.
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Re: Manna

Postby ILuvEire » Fri 16 Jul 2010 10:58 pm

Oy, I come back from vacation and have this thread to read! It's wonderful.
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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Sun 18 Jul 2010 1:40 am

“I think it's been agreed that symbology (spell checker says that's not a word and offers no alternatives) comes AFTER language is in use.”
A word is made up of sounds that represent common cultural symbols. The symbols must be created before a sound can represent it. I have tried to help you understand how piss could be associated with an edible plant by explaining it’s symbology. Symbology is the study of the common cultural symbols that create words. Anyone can create a word if they use common cultural symbols and create shortcuts to meaning. Words that also use the root of piss are penus and the river Pishon. The river Pishon was said to “gush” unlike the Nile and it’s easy to see why the word penus was built from the onomatopoetic root of piss. Cicer (chick, chichi, ce ce) is the Son of Oannes (Yonah) represented by the common cultural symbol of a dove. The ancients thought fruitfulness/fertility fell from the sky and was a blessing from their god. The miraculous appearance of honey in the hive was thought to come from the sky. After all, it was delivered by bees.
"It is said, 2 Kings 6:25, that during the siege of Samaria, "the fourth part of a cab," little more than half a pint, "of doves’ dung was sold for five pieces of silver," about two and a half dollars. As doves’ dung is not a nourishment for man, even in the most extreme famine, the general opinion is, that it was a kind of chick-pea, lentil, or tare, which has very much the appearance of doves’ dung. Great quantities of these are sold in Cairo to the pilgrims going to Mecca; and at Damascus there are many shops where nothing else is done but preparing chickpeas. These, parched in a copper pan, and dried, are of great service to those who take long journeys."

Source: ATS Bible Dictionary
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Re: Manna

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Sun 18 Jul 2010 10:02 pm

falasha wrote:“I think it's been agreed that symbology (spell checker says that's not a word and offers no alternatives) comes AFTER language is in use.”
A word is made up of sounds that represent common cultural symbols. . . . ."


Sound symbology is a minor feature in the formation of vocabulary.

I challenge you to explain the meaning of the Georgian word <deda> by sound symbology as compared to the equivalent in most I-E languages, Hebrew, and Mandarin.
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Re: Manna

Postby dtp883 » Mon 19 Jul 2010 10:32 am

Just for reference the corresponding words are, but not limited to, Mamá, Madre, Mère, Mother, Mom, ima, ma (chinese with a tonal mark), right?
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Re: Manna

Postby falasha » Mon 19 Jul 2010 2:28 pm

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
falasha wrote:“I think it's been agreed that symbology (spell checker says that's not a word and offers no alternatives) comes AFTER language is in use.”
A word is made up of sounds that represent common cultural symbols. . . . ."


Sound symbology is a minor feature in the formation of vocabulary.

I challenge you to explain the meaning of the Georgian word <deda> by sound symbology as compared to the equivalent in most I-E languages, Hebrew, and Mandarin.


I am not familiar with Georgian cultural symbols.
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