City of Scribes

The place to discuss extinct languages.

Re: City of Scribes

Postby dtp883 » Sat 17 Jul 2010 12:17 pm

I'd hate to be wrong but I might be, putting this out here. I don't think that ancestor worship really counts as a religion in the sense of the earlier conversation because it isn't used to explain how the world was made, how or why the world works, and doesn't really concern anything supernatural except affirmation of some afterlife; it could be PART of a religion, but on it's own, at least to me, it really isn't in the same sense.

Anyway, that's quite a large and healthy culture that isn't religious.

I'm sure there are many who'd disagree.
And where do you draw the line between religion and philosophy? We can see obviously that liberalism isn't a religion, and Christianity is a religion, but what about Confucianism, Taoism or Buddhism?

I'd say that line is very visible but I just might not be able to see the grey too well. Confucianism is a philosophy, concerned mainly with social and personal interactions, government, ethics and one's effect on the natural and social worlds.
Religions, like Taoism and Buddhism, may be concerned with some or all of these ideas but are also inclusive of beliefs concerning creation, afterlife, gods, the supernatural and mysticism, such as feng shui, or a universal battle between the forces of good and evil (yin-yang). And any of these beliefs may be used as rationale for philosophical ideals.
Whenever someone talks about Eastern religions, it seems like some form of PC, xenophilia and popular opinion causes them to pussyfoot around classification. Just because these religions are not analogues with our pantheons, afterlives, and traditions, doesn't mean that they aren't the same societal concepts (religion) and didn't develop for the same reasons.
Native: English (NW American)
Advanced: Spanish
Intermediate: French
Beginning: Arabic (MSA/Egyptian)
Some day: German
User avatar
dtp883
 
Posts: 414
Joined: Sat 18 Apr 2009 10:51 pm
Location: San Francisco Area

Re: City of Scribes

Postby Talib » Sat 17 Jul 2010 7:45 pm

Anyway, that's quite a large and healthy culture that isn't religious. And where do you draw the line between religion and philosophy? We can see obviously that liberalism isn't a religion, and Christianity is a religion, but what about Confucianism, Taoism or Buddhism? Confucianism and Taoism, which most consider religions, were suppressed by rulers who ascribed to legalism, which most consider a political philosophy, because they saw them as differing political ideologies. However it wasn't just about suppressing religious philosophies or anything, mohism was another common political philosophy, which was also suppressed by legalism.
Not uncommon at all. Persecution of religion for political purposes is common throughout history and continues today in modern China. The divide between religion and ideology is not always clear either (compare Islamism).
China in particular is very hard to stuff into a religious vs. irreligious box.
Probably because many Chinese don't practice what we would generally recognize as "religion." That doesn't mean they're entirely secularist (they're not) but plenty are at least atheistic.
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: City of Scribes

Postby falasha » Sat 17 Jul 2010 10:37 pm

How can anyone know how Chinese people feel or think privately? Anyway, their Lord has been replaced by State. Mothers are required to relinquish their reproductive rights to the State and their economy is dictated by the State. In ancient China, the people believed fruitfulness came from a higher power. They believed in spirits and heaven. What other criteria do you need? They believed in magical forces as an explaination for the meaning of life.
falasha
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon 07 Jun 2010 12:08 pm

Re: City of Scribes

Postby falasha » Sun 18 Jul 2010 1:59 am

ILuvEire wrote:The Pirahã of Brazil are notably athiestic, I hear.


Pirahan has the the smallest phoneme inventory of any known language. Their religious concepts are coincidentally very basic. They have a designated priest that uses a high-pitched voice when he speaks for spirits. They also have words in their language to symbolize the spirit realm.
falasha
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon 07 Jun 2010 12:08 pm

Re: City of Scribes

Postby Elijah » Tue 21 Feb 2012 5:17 am

Sorry, falasha, you're thinking of Rotokas. Piraha, unless you analyze /k/ as an underlying /hi/, has more phonemes than Rotokas.
Do you believe in linguistic relativism? Because that's what you're saying about the Piraha.
Oh, and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNajfMZGnuo
Native: American English
Learning: Mandarin, Burmese, Japanese
Want to learn: Cantonese, ASL, Basque?
Elijah
 
Posts: 96
Joined: Sat 28 May 2011 7:24 am
Location: Colorado in the US

Previous

Return to Extinct languages

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 2 guests