The Bee

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The Bee

Postby falasha » Fri 02 Jul 2010 5:00 pm

The ancients must have known that the Bee will lead them to honey. Bees "talk" to each other in their manner of flight and perhaps the ancients learned to read their patterns. Surely the sweetness of Honey made it a highly prized commodity. The reward for learning the flight language of Bees was great indeed! The clever Bees created precious honey in their hexagon hives in a mysterious way known only to God.

The semetic root DVR/DBR is associated with many Bee attributes. Flit, flight, thought, language, word, commune, speaker, etc. The bee hive also has inspired many ideas such as; solder, weld, NECK, inner sanctuary, Holy of Holies and oracle. The ancients that learned the language patterns of bees were highly successful and modern humans are the benefactors.

The story of Joseph and Aseneth tells how Bees were able to transform a pagan into a child of God. Aseneth loved Joseph but was a daughter of a pagan priest. Her transformation was brought about by Bees building a honeycomb surrounding her so that God could work his miracle. The creative power of Bees became the word of God that could remake a pagan into a holy mother.
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Re: The Bee

Postby falasha » Fri 02 Jul 2010 6:44 pm

The six-sided cell of the honeycomb is also the inner chamber of the Star of David and the shape of the early church. The six sides were the earthly abode of men but the seventh was given to God.
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Re: The Bee

Postby dtp883 » Fri 02 Jul 2010 9:57 pm

I always thought that DBR meant thing, object, words of a similar idea, and to speak and it's derivatives: speaker, to be spoken of, etc. (Milah is word in Hebrew but I think that it's DBR in Arabic.)

I'm pretty sure the following words are not part of the DBR root: flight, commune, and language.

While bees are certainly amazing in their own right, I don't see how most of these words are specific to them. Birds and other insects fly. Bird language would be much more noticeable to ancient peoples than that of bees. Thought, language, word, and speech are normally thought of, especially in pre-20th century, as being solely human traits. Part of the reason why humans were like God and animals, especially insects, were not.

God used many forms of nature in the bible to convert the lost. In the story of Jonah, a whale eat Jonah (surrounding honeycomb?) and three days later he is spat up and emerges a holier man. Moses turns water into blood like Jesus turns water into wine; it rains for forty days and nights; Moses parts the Red Sea; Jesus walks on water; Jesus' disciples are fisherman. From this you can infer that water is extremely important since God uses it in so many ways in his plan, and this makes sense, since water would be (and still is) so important to an ancient society and life in general, yet bees are only mentioned in one, possibly a few, places in the bible.
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Re: The Bee

Postby falasha » Sat 03 Jul 2010 12:00 am

dtp883 wrote:I always thought that DBR meant thing, object, words of a similar idea, and to speak and it's derivatives: speaker, to be spoken of, etc. (Milah is word in Hebrew but I think that it's DBR in Arabic.)

I'm pretty sure the following words are not part of the DBR root: flight, commune, and language.

While bees are certainly amazing in their own right, I don't see how most of these words are specific to them. Birds and other insects fly. Bird language would be much more noticeable to ancient peoples than that of bees. Thought, language, word, and speech are normally thought of, especially in pre-20th century, as being solely human traits. Part of the reason why humans were like God and animals, especially insects, were not.

God used many forms of nature in the bible to convert the lost. In the story of Jonah, a whale eat Jonah (surrounding honeycomb?) and three days later he is spat up and emerges a holier man. Moses turns water into blood like Jesus turns water into wine; it rains for forty days and nights; Moses parts the Red Sea; Jesus walks on water; Jesus' disciples are fisherman. From this you can infer that water is extremely important since God uses it in so many ways in his plan, and this makes sense, since water would be (and still is) so important to an ancient society and life in general, yet bees are only mentioned in one, possibly a few, places in the bible.


http://hebraicroots.net/pipermail/list_ ... 00063.html


This link shows the words using DBR/DVR as root.
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Re: The Bee

Postby falasha » Sat 03 Jul 2010 12:17 am

The Bible is a good source of myth (I am not religious) but it certainly is not the only source. Egyptian heiroglyphs are also a good source to understand the root concept of words. Hebrew is a Canaanite language.

DBR/DVR root is also used to form word for "float'. The ancients would perform burial at sea because they thought that it would travel to the Underworld (below the horizon line) much as the sun did. They thought the person would pass through the body of a leviathan and be reborn as a bird. This myth sounds similar to the story of Jonah and the whale. Especially because the root of Jonah is used to form the word for 'Dove'.
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Re: The Bee

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Sat 03 Jul 2010 3:15 am

falasha wrote:The Bible is a good source of myth (I am not religious) but it certainly is not the only source. Egyptian heiroglyphs are also a good source to understand the root concept of words. Hebrew is a Canaanite language.

. . . .


Note, however, that Egyptian and the Semitic languages are different branches of the Afro-Asiatic family, and the triliteral didn't develop the same way in Egyptian.
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Re: The Bee

Postby dtp883 » Sat 03 Jul 2010 5:16 am

I'm not sure if I would take this website as fact.
1. dabar (pronounced davar) - verb, "to take," "drive," "lead" (the flock)

In Hebrew, take is laqakh, drive is nahag, and I think lead is nihel.
hidbir (hithpael verb form) - "to be intimate," "being intimate with
another"

I don't know about that but hidber means to discuss.
dabar - masc. noun, "leader"

This is half right, but the standard word for leader is manhig, coming from the same root as to drive, nahag.

This site gets a lot of things right but too much of it is apparently erroneous and should be taken lightly.
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Re: The Bee

Postby falasha » Sat 03 Jul 2010 4:43 pm

dtp883 wrote:I'm not sure if I would take this website as fact.
1. dabar (pronounced davar) - verb, "to take," "drive," "lead" (the flock)

In Hebrew, take is laqakh, drive is nahag, and I think lead is nihel.
hidbir (hithpael verb form) - "to be intimate," "being intimate with
another"

I don't know about that but hidber means to discuss.
dabar - masc. noun, "leader"

This is half right, but the standard word for leader is manhig, coming from the same root as to drive, nahag.

This site gets a lot of things right but too much of it is apparently erroneous and should be taken lightly.


I agree. That is really not a good site. I will try and find a better one.
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Re: The Bee

Postby falasha » Sat 03 Jul 2010 4:46 pm

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
falasha wrote:The Bible is a good source of myth (I am not religious) but it certainly is not the only source. Egyptian heiroglyphs are also a good source to understand the root concept of words. Hebrew is a Canaanite language.

. . . .


Note, however, that Egyptian and the Semitic languages are different branches of the Afro-Asiatic family, and the triliteral didn't develop the same way in Egyptian.


That is true. However, the common cultural images of many people in Nilotic culture (including Lake Hula) came from the high civilization of Delta.
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Re: The Bee

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Sat 03 Jul 2010 9:13 pm

falasha wrote:
Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
falasha wrote:The Bible is a good source of myth (I am not religious) but it certainly is not the only source. Egyptian heiroglyphs are also a good source to understand the root concept of words. Hebrew is a Canaanite language.

. . . .


Note, however, that Egyptian and the Semitic languages are different branches of the Afro-Asiatic family, and the triliteral didn't develop the same way in Egyptian.


That is true. However, the common cultural images of many people in Nilotic culture (including Lake Hula) came from the high civilization of Delta.


Cite, please.
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