ceorzani language

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ceorzani language

Postby Alisbet » Mon 31 May 2010 2:02 pm

Hello there, this is my first attempt at a conlang on this site, I hope that you like it.

Anyway, ceorzani language or ling d'a ceorza is spoken by a race of people, called ceorza, in a faraway planet that is quite similar to our own. The ceorza people are rather unusual in many respects. For example, they refer to each other by their first names. That is because their last names do not pass in the family. Rather, they are descriptive. For example, auntyr giarnoa literally means auntyr the agrarian and so on. The most common form is to simply add the first name of the father and -fajor for boys and -ceyhan for girls. The writing system of the language is rather smooth and it is written in the boustrophedon style that evokes the flow of the water. One of the most unusual aspects of the language is that it does not use capital letters and all and the official transliterations of the language also follows this rule; it is considered as offensive if one writes a ceorzani name starting with a capital letter. Anyway, here is some basic words in ceorzani language and after that comes the alphabet.

Some words and phrases in ceorzani:

ila d'goda: Hello, literally greetings-to-you; it is considered impolite to not start a conversation without saying this first.
tirasema silwana arete d'ama: the warrior silwana returns home; traditional ceorzani idiom of unknown origin.
tyrena: potential child; the ceorzani word for fetus.
ora'seta: ceorzani word used when referring to someone that is not one of their kind, usage of this has declined nowadays and is now considered as a swear word.

Alphabet:

A-T-X-D-I-E-T-Y-Q*-O-P-L-S-W*-Z-V*-K-G-F-C-M-N-J-L

*only used in loanwords

Well, here is my first conlang on this site, more details about the language and the ceorza culture will come soon hopefully. I hope that you will like it.
Power of People is stronger than People in Power.
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby kaenif » Mon 31 May 2010 4:04 pm

That looks nice, but I have a few questions to ask.
How are the words pronounced?
What are the pronunciations of the alphabet, and what is the use of apostrophe in the words? (IPA, or IPA can help you.)
What is the underlying meaning of the idiom "tirasema silwana arete d'ama" ?

Hope that won't be to many questions for you ;)
MOAR! I'd love to see your writing system :D
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Nope, it's not shāng. It is a 囧 with a hat which 囧ed its chin off!
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby Alisbet » Mon 31 May 2010 6:38 pm

kaenif wrote:That looks nice, but I have a few questions to ask.
How are the words pronounced?
What are the pronunciations of the alphabet, and what is the use of apostrophe in the words? (IPA, or IPA can help you.)
What is the underlying meaning of the idiom "tirasema silwana arete d'ama" ?

Hope that won't be to many questions for you ;)
MOAR! I'd love to see your writing system :D


Well, i am glad that you like my language. The language is in many ways pronounced exactly as it is written, the apostrophe was not originally in the language, it was added to the official transliteration on the year 1952 (ceorzan calendar) by a group of emissaries send to the island where they live, and about the idiom, that is something that has been debated upon for many centuries, but it has been suggested that it dates back to the year 1500 (ceorzan calendar) when the last great war between the ceorzans and the Kumoris were fought or something like that.

So, I hope that those answers satisfies your interest.
Power of People is stronger than People in Power.
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby Kloiten » Mon 31 May 2010 9:11 pm

Alisbet wrote:
kaenif wrote:That looks nice, but I have a few questions to ask.
How are the words pronounced?
What are the pronunciations of the alphabet, and what is the use of apostrophe in the words? (IPA, or IPA can help you.)
What is the underlying meaning of the idiom "tirasema silwana arete d'ama" ?

Hope that won't be to many questions for you ;)
MOAR! I'd love to see your writing system :D


Well, i am glad that you like my language. The language is in many ways pronounced exactly as it is written, the apostrophe was not originally in the language...


How is it pronounced exactly as written? Could you give us IPA/X-Sampa transcriptions (as Kaenif has already mentioned)?
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Tue 01 Jun 2010 2:46 am

Familial surnames are a relatively recent development in the West, and even today aren't used in some areas. Iceland, for example, uses patronymics almost entirely.
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby kaenif » Tue 01 Jun 2010 9:43 am

Alisbet wrote:Well, i am glad that you like my language. The language is in many ways pronounced exactly as it is written, the apostrophe was not originally in the language, it was added to the official transliteration on the year 1952 (ceorzan calendar) by a group of emissaries send to the island where they live, and about the idiom, that is something that has been debated upon for many centuries, but it has been suggested that it dates back to the year 1500 (ceorzan calendar) when the last great war between the ceorzans and the Kumoris were fought or something like that.

So, I hope that those answers satisfies your interest.

:) You should definitely show us the history some time.
What I meant by underlying meaning of the idiom is that like the English expression "kicking the bucket" means "to die". So does "the warrior silwana returns home" has a underlying meaning like "we won the battle" or something like that?

I would like to know how the Q, W and V thing works. Since you said the language is spoken on another world, I suppose the language and the writing system is developed independently. The writing system/language should therefore not have a one-to-one correspondence to our Latin Alphabet. The "alphabet" would be just a transliteration/pronunciation guide, if you have a writing system for it. Have the Ceorza people ever been in contact with humans (the emissaries you said), so that they created new glyphs to write the equivalent of Q, W and V?

It is important to realise that not all languages have the same sounds as English. There is a wide variety of sounds you can make, as "harsh" as pharyngeals like this and uvulars like this in Arabic and Hebrew (French and German have uvular r.) , or strange clicks like this, ejectives like this and implosives like this, or different vowels made with different openness, and roundness of the mouth and position of your tongue here, here and here. The text on Wikipedia is too professional (at least for me), but the sound samples are wonderful. Clicking on different symbols on the bottom of each page brings you to a new sound where you can hear it. You can also listen to them here. By the time you conquer most of the IPA (i.e. the symbols), the accurate and easy way to represent sounds made, and have known about different sounds that can occur in human languages, you enter the realm of Phonology, the study of sounds in languages.

(Nah this is not scary. I may be giving too much information at the same time, and my bad English probably ruins the whole meaning, but it is really what I have done when I started my journey on constructed languages. I'm still a beginner, but the fun of constructing languages is so great, especially on the sounds. Wikipedia is always your friend, though it can be sometimes confusing)
(To others: I think I've made some mistakes [Don't mention the grammatical ones, my English is bad enough.] -_- Please correct me if you notice any.)
Can you recognise this character?
Nope, it's not shāng. It is a 囧 with a hat which 囧ed its chin off!
囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧!
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby Alisbet » Tue 01 Jun 2010 2:16 pm

I know that some of things in my language doesn't please you. After all, it is still work in progress and things like that, and it is likely going to change from what you see here. Just give me time, and that is all.
Power of People is stronger than People in Power.
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby Alisbet » Thu 03 Jun 2010 3:57 pm

Some of you may have wondered how the ceorzani words are pronounced. I am now delighted to introduce the phonology of my conlang ceorzani, so, enjoy. It is still incomplete though so, if you have any suggestions, feel free to PM me.

A: A as in aorta
J: H as in Juan; this is the same sound as in spanish, this letter is used very rarely in the language, there is about 20 words with this letter in it.
I: E as in energy
O: O as in hole
S: S as in save

And that is all for now. Based on this list, it seems that my claim that the ceorzani words and letters are pronounced is incorrect, this language appears to be much more complex than i first though.

Anyway, the next time I shall reveal more aspects of this wonderful language like digraphs and such, see you next time. I also have updated the alphabet in that the letters G, L and P is now used only in the loanwords
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby linguoboy » Thu 03 Jun 2010 5:46 pm

Alisbet wrote:Some of you may have wondered how the ceorzani words are pronounced. I am now delighted to introduce the phonology of my conlang ceorzani, so, enjoy. It is still incomplete though so, if you have any suggestions, feel free to PM me.

A: A as in aorta
J: H as in Juan; this is the same sound as in spanish, this letter is used very rarely in the language, there is about 20 words with this letter in it.
I: E as in energy
O: O as in hole
S: S as in save

And that is all for now. Based on this list, it seems that my claim that the ceorzani words and letters are pronounced is incorrect, this language appears to be much more complex than i first though.

1. It's a bad idea in general to use English-based values like this. The usual standard for Latin-based transcription is "vowels as in Italian, consonants as in English" unless otherwise specified.
2. There are two e's in "energy" and each has a different sound. You might want to choose another example word or--better yet--use some form of conventional phonetic transcription. (It doesn't have to be IPA, though this has the advantage of being the most widely-accepted one.)
3. I still don't even know how to pronounce ceorzani since you give values for only three of the eight letters. (I'm guessing "see-ore-ZANE-ee", but that's just that--a guess.)
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Re: ceorzani language

Postby Alisbet » Thu 03 Jun 2010 7:36 pm

linguoboy wrote:
Alisbet wrote:Some of you may have wondered how the ceorzani words are pronounced. I am now delighted to introduce the phonology of my conlang ceorzani, so, enjoy. It is still incomplete though so, if you have any suggestions, feel free to PM me.

A: A as in aorta
J: H as in Juan; this is the same sound as in spanish, this letter is used very rarely in the language, there is about 20 words with this letter in it.
I: E as in energy
O: O as in hole
S: S as in save

And that is all for now. Based on this list, it seems that my claim that the ceorzani words and letters are pronounced is incorrect, this language appears to be much more complex than i first though.

1. It's a bad idea in general to use English-based values like this. The usual standard for Latin-based transcription is "vowels as in Italian, consonants as in English" unless otherwise specified.
2. There are two e's in "energy" and each has a different sound. You might want to choose another example word or--better yet--use some form of conventional phonetic transcription. (It doesn't have to be IPA, though this has the advantage of being the most widely-accepted one.)
3. I still don't even know how to pronounce ceorzani since you give values for only three of the eight letters. (I'm guessing "see-ore-ZANE-ee", but that's just that--a guess.)


Well, thanks for the comment anyway, I try to improve it as we speak. Also, about how you pronounced the word ceorzani, that is rather close in my opinion, I would have pronounced it like this: see-oar-ZAN-i.
Power of People is stronger than People in Power.
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