Native American Corner

The place to discuss extinct languages.

Re: Native American Corner

Postby linguoboy » Mon 10 May 2010 7:23 pm

Yaziq wrote:If you are going to discuss, for instance, Indo-European languages in a historical framework you are dealing with languages that are both living and extinct.

So what you are saying is that you'd like to see this become a thread for discussing indigenous languages of the Americas (living and dead) within a historical framework?
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Re: Native American Corner

Postby Yaziq » Tue 11 May 2010 4:54 pm

Yes, that is one direction it could go. I would like to see what theories Native Americans have about their origins. But the direction it takes is up to those who respond.
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Re: Native American Corner

Postby formiko » Fri 14 May 2010 8:22 am

Yaziq wrote:Yes, that is one direction it could go. I would like to see what theories Native Americans have about their origins. But the direction it takes is up to those who respond.


My theory on the origins of Amerind languages has some support with contemporary linguists. I believe in dual or triple migration. There were waves that came across the Bering strait (Na-Dene, etc) while there were more waves that came from the south..from Chile northwards. There also may have been another wave that arrived in the Caribbean (Carib, Arawak, etc).
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Re: Native American Corner

Postby Yaziq » Sat 15 May 2010 5:44 pm

That's very interesting. Academic orthodoxy places emphasis on the Bering Strait and the "ice-free corridors" as the main source of influx into the New World. Clovis points found in various locations don't really contradict this theory. Do you think that definite links between Siberian Tunguska and Yurok tribes and Amerind tribes can be proved? Moving south, I find the legend of Quetzalcoatl to be most interesting. Could he have been a Norseman or someone else entirely?
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Re: Native American Corner

Postby formiko » Mon 17 May 2010 9:31 am

Take the Easter Island statues...there were obviously pacific islanders there....and it doesn't take too much of a stretch to think they went the extra 50 miles to the mainland. While logistically it seems close to impossible for an entire people group to migrate from Alaska to the Brazilian rain forests, even over 5,000 years time. It's possible, just not probable. Linguistically. the languages pretty much change completely once you're south of Mexico. Also, the Arawak languages are different from their Macro-Ge neighbors. I'm not saying that Algonquin has Norse roots, (although that is much more believable than Eskimos traveling to the Brazilian rain forest :)). I only pretty much have anecdotal evidence, nothing concrete. Are The Guaraní from Africa? Doubtful. But if someone had a theory of Etruscan linkage to the Quechua, I wouldn't be shocked.
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