tower orthography

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Re: tower orthography

Postby linguoboy » Sat 20 Mar 2010 1:41 am

telal wrote:
linguoboy wrote:What languages out there use c to represent [ʃ]?

Zhuang, Kabyle and Beninese Yoruba

Ah yes--all languages one would expect the average English-speaker to be intimately familiar with.
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Re: tower orthography

Postby THEthe » Sat 20 Mar 2010 1:49 am

ok, im going to ask the original guy about that

i know that a good orthography balances ethymology and pronunciation; but ina language so messed as english is just too complicated
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Re: tower orthography

Postby telal » Sat 20 Mar 2010 2:15 am

linguoboy wrote:
telal wrote:
linguoboy wrote:What languages out there use c to represent [ʃ]?

Zhuang, Kabyle and Beninese Yoruba

Ah yes--all languages one would expect the average English-speaker to be intimately familiar with.


I don't remember anyone suggesting that the average English-speaker would be intimately familiar with those languages, but they do use 'c' for /S/, and that is what you asked.
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Re: tower orthography

Postby Talib » Sat 20 Mar 2010 2:50 am

The point is that it doesn't do the average English speaker much good to know that Zhuang uses <c> to spell [ʃ]. I'm willing to bet fewer than 99% of them have even heard of Zhuang. It's just as counterintuitive either way, whereas <sh> is well-established and has been used for centuries. If we want to go further back, <sc> was used before then, and there are Middle English variants like <ssh> and <sch>. Never <c>.
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Re: tower orthography

Postby THEthe » Sat 20 Mar 2010 2:55 am

hey english speaking people
if you all can learn that nonsense you call othography it will be very easy to use "c" for the "sh" sound
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Re: tower orthography

Postby Talib » Sat 20 Mar 2010 3:11 am

What's your native language?
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Re: tower orthography

Postby THEthe » Sat 20 Mar 2010 3:15 am

Talib wrote:What's your native language?

román paladino
if you get the joke i guive you extra points
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Re: tower orthography

Postby telal » Sat 20 Mar 2010 4:35 am

Talib wrote:The point is that it doesn't do the average English speaker much good to know that Zhuang uses <c> to spell [ʃ]. I'm willing to bet fewer than 99% of them have even heard of Zhuang. It's just as counterintuitive either way, whereas <sh> is well-established and has been used for centuries. If we want to go further back, <sc> was used before then, and there are Middle English variants like <ssh> and <sch>. Never <c>.


In French and Portuguese 'ch' is used for /S/, do you think those languages are alien to English speakers?

Spanish sometimes uses 'x', most especially in the transcription of indigenous American languages, does that seem like something that 99% of English speakers would be familiar with?
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Re: tower orthography

Postby THEthe » Sat 20 Mar 2010 5:16 am

telal wrote:
Talib wrote:The point is that it doesn't do the average English speaker much good to know that Zhuang uses <c> to spell [ʃ]. I'm willing to bet fewer than 99% of them have even heard of Zhuang. It's just as counterintuitive either way, whereas <sh> is well-established and has been used for centuries. If we want to go further back, <sc> was used before then, and there are Middle English variants like <ssh> and <sch>. Never <c>.


In French and Portuguese 'ch' is used for /S/, do you think those languages are alien to English speakers?

Spanish sometimes uses 'x', most especially in the transcription of indigenous American languages, does that seem like something that 99% of English speakers would be familiar with?


well there are many ways to represent the /S/ sound, his proble is ethymology.
he is talking about that is huld be like in other germanic languages

P.D: telal: tell me what you think about his othography
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Re: tower orthography

Postby Talib » Sat 20 Mar 2010 5:36 am

In French and Portuguese 'ch' is used for /S/, do you think those languages are alien to English speakers?
For many of them, yes actually they are, especially Portuguese. Besides that, English already uses <ch> for [tʃ]. What do you plan to use to in its place then?
Spanish sometimes uses 'x', most especially in the transcription of indigenous American languages, does that seem like something that 99% of English speakers would be familiar with?
No. So I don't see how it's relevant.
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