The Life of Esperanto

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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby linguoboy » Tue 02 Feb 2010 9:45 pm

formiko wrote:If you want to learn a "cyrillic" language, I'd advise Bulgarian/Macedonian. My friends says it is simple in comparison.

In comparison to what? It's got one of the most truly terrifying conglomeration of conjugations I've seen this side of Korean.
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Talib » Wed 03 Feb 2010 12:07 am

To Russian? Bulgarian and Macedonian are supposed to be considerably more analytic than other Slavic languages, or so I've heard.
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby linguoboy » Wed 03 Feb 2010 12:14 am

Talib wrote:To Russian? Bulgarian and Macedonian are supposed to be considerably more analytic than other Slavic languages, or so I've heard.

Analytic isn't always easier. Russian has two simple tenses (non-past and past) and two compound ones (future and subjunctive), plus one aspectual distinction. Bulgarian has the same aspectual distinction carried out through nine tenses (simple and compound), two voices, and four moods. The fact that many of these are expressed analytically hardly makes them a breeze to master. Just ask any Russian learner of English!
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby formiko » Wed 03 Feb 2010 2:55 am

linguoboy wrote:In comparison to what?

In comparison to Russian. Anyway with Russian, I just find vocabulary very easy. Like зима is winter, and it's feminine because it ends in a. зиму is accusative, зимы is genitive.
For карандаш is both nominative and accusative for masculine, карандаша is genitive.
Almost always (besides small changes in stress in some words), it's just easier, and it seems more like a Romance language. Easier than German in my book. ;)
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Talib » Wed 03 Feb 2010 2:58 am

linguoboy wrote:
Talib wrote:To Russian? Bulgarian and Macedonian are supposed to be considerably more analytic than other Slavic languages, or so I've heard.

Analytic isn't always easier. Russian has two simple tenses (non-past and past) and two compound ones (future and subjunctive), plus one aspectual distinction. Bulgarian has the same aspectual distinction carried out through nine tenses (simple and compound), two voices, and four moods. The fact that many of these are expressed analytically hardly makes them a breeze to master. Just ask any Russian learner of English!
Of course not (I mean, I'm learning Chinese, ffs) but generally, all things equal a more analytic grammar comes easier to English speakers.

Ps. I don't know how much you know about Russian but aren't the past and non-past the same thing as saying perfect vs. imperfect? Or is that my Arabic interfering?
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Delodephius » Wed 03 Feb 2010 2:16 pm

Slavic languages are easy. Compared to each other. If you know one the others are a breeze.
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby linguoboy » Wed 03 Feb 2010 4:22 pm

formiko wrote:In comparison to Russian.


Russian: я писал = Bulgarian: пишех, писах, писал съм, бях писал, щях да пиша, съм щял пиша, съм бил писал, щях да съм писал, съм щял да съм писал

Please to explain to me, formiko and Talib, how it is you find the "less analytic" Russian verb system more complicated and challenging to master than the "more analytic" Bulgarian one.

Delodephius wrote:Slavic languages are easy. Compared to each other. If you know one the others are a breeze.

I'd be very curious to find out how many Russian-speakers have learned Bulgarian and what native speakers of Bulgarian think of their speech.
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Delodephius » Wed 03 Feb 2010 7:26 pm

I'd be very curious to find out how many Russian-speakers have learned Bulgarian

Few I imagine. Bulgarian is not really a popular Slavic language and is poorly studied by other Slavic speakers.

and what native speakers of Bulgarian think of their speech.

I wouldn't know. They probably make fun of how it sounds, like we do in Serbia. :D
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Talib » Wed 03 Feb 2010 9:08 pm

linguoboy wrote:Please to explain to me, formiko and Talib, how it is you find the "less analytic" Russian verb system more complicated and challenging to master than the "more analytic" Bulgarian one.
Hey I said nothing about Bulgarian being easier than Russian. I just said more analytic languages tend to be easier for English speakers than more fusional ones.
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby linguoboy » Wed 03 Feb 2010 9:48 pm

Talib wrote:Hey I said nothing about Bulgarian being easier than Russian. I just said more analytic languages tend to be easier for English speakers than more fusional ones.

You did say you'd heard that Bulgarian was "more analytic" than Russian. In fact, this is only true of the nominal system. As you can see, it has more verbal forms than Russian--both analytic and otherwise.
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