Chinese IMEs

The place to discuss alphabets and other writing systems.

Chinese IMEs

Postby Talib » Sun 24 Jan 2010 7:57 am

I dislike the IME I'm currently using for Chinese (which is simplified characters inputted with pinyin) and I'm thinking of switching. For those of you who use traditional characters, which method do you use to input them? And does anyone know of an input system for traditional characters that uses pinyin? I don't really feel like using zhuyin because it's a pain to learn a whole new keyboard layout.
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby kaenif » Sun 24 Jan 2010 9:25 am

Talib wrote:I dislike the IME I'm currently using for Chinese (which is simplified characters inputted with pinyin) and I'm thinking of switching. For those of you who use traditional characters, which method do you use to input them? And does anyone know of an input system for traditional characters that uses pinyin? I don't really feel like using zhuyin because it's a pain to learn a whole new keyboard layout.

If you're using "New Zhuyin (微軟新注音)", I think you can set it to input with pinyin (the fourth button, then "內容").
For me, I use the Quick Method (速成), it is done by taking the first and the last code of Cangjie (倉頡). Cangjie is done by breaking up the characters into pieces which can be represented by 24 keys (and extra 2 for special purposes). People can type very fast if they are familiar with it, but it is harder to learn than pinyin/zhuyin.
Can you recognise this character?
Nope, it's not shāng. It is a 囧 with a hat which 囧ed its chin off!
囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧!
User avatar
kaenif
 
Posts: 131
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:31 am
Location: Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby Neqitan » Sun 24 Jan 2010 5:57 pm

Well, I think the easiest way to type traditional for us westerners with keyboards that only have either ASCII or ANSI on their keyboard would be using Google's Chinese IME:

http://www.google.com/ime/pinyin/

Once you've installed it, just press Ctrl + Shift + T to change between traditional and simplified.

Cangjie is cool, the idea is ingenious, I tried to learn it once (4-letter Cangjie though, not the quick method, it seems easier to me), but... Urgh, it's kinda confusing to guess which radical is the one I need to input (specially considering there's only ONE combination that will do the job). Didn't put that much effort in learning it, anyway.
User avatar
Neqitan
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Fri 17 Apr 2009 9:59 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby Talib » Sun 24 Jan 2010 8:02 pm

Thanks for the replies.
Cangjie is cool, the idea is ingenious, I tried to learn it once (4-letter Cangjie though, not the quick method, it seems easier to me), but... Urgh, it's kinda confusing to guess which radical is the one I need to input (specially considering there's only ONE combination that will do the job). Didn't put that much effort in learning it, anyway.
The confusing part for me is that it doesn't actually go by radical, but more or less arbitrary parts of characters.

One thing I've never understood is why stroke-by-stroke methods like Wubi haven't really caught on. With a little leeway for differing stroke order, it seems like a very efficient way of typing since it's essentially the same as you'd write the characters by hand.
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby linguoboy » Mon 25 Jan 2010 4:22 pm

I've no doubt that the various stroke-order and character-shape methods are quicker for people who are well-acquainted with the characters, but I don't do enough typing to justify the effort it would take to learn one. I use a Bopomofo-based method, which is slightly quicker than Pinyin but a real pain when you're trying to type a character whose pronunciation you can't remember or never learned.
english*deutsch*nederlands*català*castellano*gaelainn*cymraeg*français*svenska*韓國말*漢語
linguoboy
 
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:02 am

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby kaenif » Tue 26 Jan 2010 3:40 am

linguoboy wrote:I've no doubt that the various stroke-order and character-shape methods are quicker for people who are well-acquainted with the characters, but I don't do enough typing to justify the effort it would take to learn one. I use a Bopomofo-based method, which is slightly quicker than Pinyin but a real pain when you're trying to type a character whose pronunciation you can't remember or never learned.

For me, when I remember the pronunciation but not the shape, I go here to get the code for the character, which is found by inputting Cantonese pronunciation.
I think it would not be very useful for you all, but just to mention :P
Can you recognise this character?
Nope, it's not shāng. It is a 囧 with a hat which 囧ed its chin off!
囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧!
User avatar
kaenif
 
Posts: 131
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:31 am
Location: Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby Talib » Tue 26 Jan 2010 4:56 am

And when you know how to write it but not the pronunciation?
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby kaenif » Tue 26 Jan 2010 10:05 am

Talib wrote:And when you know how to write it but not the pronunciation?

I can directly enter the character by Quick Method. The database above also enables you to find the pronunciation by entering a char.
Can you recognise this character?
Nope, it's not shāng. It is a 囧 with a hat which 囧ed its chin off!
囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧!
User avatar
kaenif
 
Posts: 131
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:31 am
Location: Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby sokuban » Tue 09 Mar 2010 9:34 pm

I have always had a problem finding a good Chinese IME, especially for Linux, where most seem to be worse.

I have now settled on using Chewing's Zhuyin input with the Eten-26 keyboard. Most Zhuyin keyboards suck (and Eten-26 is no exception), but I think it is the best because at least it only uses 26 keys and the tones are in a convenient location. It feels a little bit better than pinyin, and of course the conversion engine is much better since it is designed for traditional characters.

CangJie etc are also good I guess, but it is difficult to learn I think because when you type, you don't think in the characters, you think in the sounds. I just don't know how people's minds could process CangJie codes fast enough to type at a good speed, unless they remembered the way to type each character; which would take a long time.

Chewing is nice because of its way of handling sentences; and most of the time it guesses correctly, though I really wish they had a better system to differentiate stuff with the same sound and tone especially those that are common like 他/她/牠 etc.

As for the quick method; it sounds like it would work if there was a Chewing-style smart database; but if not, then it would be difficult because of a lot of menus.
User avatar
sokuban
 
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri 17 Apr 2009 4:49 pm

Re: Chinese IMEs

Postby Declan » Tue 09 Mar 2010 9:46 pm

What do the Chinese do? A western keyboard with an IME or something different?
Native: English
Very good: Irish
Reasonable: German, French
Very basic: Latin.
Declan
 
Posts: 122
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 6:51 am

Next

Return to Writing systems

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 1 guest

cron