Your language learning adventures

The place to discuss learning languages

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby formiko » Wed 02 Dec 2009 8:21 am

ErzsebetGilbert wrote:
formiko wrote:
ErzsebetGilbert wrote:Anybody else have experience with Magyarul?


I love Hungarian. I think it's a beautiful language, especially spoken by a woman. :)
Though I find it difficult to remember vocabulary, as it is COMPLETELY foreign to my IE mindset.(Cherokee is foreign enough!)



Hey! It's neat to know somebody else has experience with at least hearing Hungarian. It is so lovely to listen to and often to speak, fun to learn, and as my mother-in-law has pointed out, it's perfect for poetry - words can be placed in almost any order in a sentence, allowing for really lyrical rhythms and rhymes. Thanks!


I happen to like Zanzibár and I especially like the vowel harmony. Sentences just seem to flow.
http://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanzibar
ᏙᏒᏓᎵ ᏗᏑᎶ ᎭᏫ
User avatar
formiko
 
Posts: 404
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:31 am
Location: Angola

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby Sobekhotep » Thu 03 Dec 2009 12:41 am

formiko wrote:I happen to like Zanzibár

I think the way you spelled it it refers to the island Zanzibar in Tanzania. :geek:
ለሐዘበ ፡ ዘየደአ
User avatar
Sobekhotep
 
Posts: 714
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 4:53 am
Location: America's Dairyland

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby footpanda13 » Thu 10 Dec 2009 4:41 am

I'm rather new here, and I find this to be a highly interesting thread :)
I am a native Spanish speaker. I was born and raised in Venezuela. At school we studied some English clandestinely, seeing as our teacher figured it would be useful nowadays. To be frank, if English had been an official course, I probably would have flunked. Past "hi," I couldn't really manage much. :oops:
Then the tables turned; my dad was transferred to the USA, and we moved here. I began school here in the fifth grade. Since it's Texas, they have bilingual English-Spanish programs here for limited English speakers. Unfortunately, for reasons I later discovered, my parents decided to put me in full-time English, no bilingual. It was a wreck. I would stay up late doing spelling homework, I would fail all history tests,... you get the idea. :shock: But the suffering lasted only until the fourth month of school, which is when English began to "click." And I'm sure you guys know better than I do about what happens when you're thrown into the ocean to learn to swim, linguistically speaking.
My language ventures were put on hold after my fifth grade year. Sixth grade my English improved exponentially, so I was in honors English by the time I got into the seventh grade. However, seventh grade was when I began studying French. You see, all my life, since about the age of seven, I had wanted to learn Italian. Since they didn't offer it at my school, I decided to take the closest thing-- which I figured was French. Due to my Spanish knowledge, French was a breeze. I kept on studying French for the rest of middle school, and I realized I was very good at it. Then, just last year, I won a huge state French competition as a freshman and received a scholarship to spend three weeks abroad in France during the summer. During this time, my French improved immensely.

This year I am in my fourth year of French (which is a blow-off class for me) and decided to study Latin, simply because there was a hole in my schedule (and I was NOT about to fill it with P.E.... pshh). I figured, "heh, why not?" and signed up for the class. And you would not believe how glad I am I went out on that limb. I have fallen in love with the Latin language and regret not having started it sooner. My Latin teacher has also exposed us to bits of Ancient Greek, and I think it was also love at first sight. I'm definitely planning on learning it at some point.

My friend and I have toyed with Japanese, but I gave up on that rather quickly. I learned the kana, some basic grammar, and around 100 kanji before giving up (stress, AP classes, and other excuses), but I am planning to keep studying at some point in the not-too-distant future and achieving some proficiency and literacy (fluency is not my goal, although I could very easily change my mind about that). My friend, who knows around 2000 kanji by now, will be my inspiration for when I pick Japanese right back up.

I have made some online Brazilian friends, and they have aroused in me an interest in Portuguese. I also have not abandoned my childhood dreams of learning Italian. Although I know I could easily teach myself these languages, I'm hoping to pursue these languages in college as I do my linguistics major, since I want a study concentration that will be interesting, easy, and rewarding. Still, sometimes I can't reach

Aside from that, I find Arabic and Turkish to be beautiful languages that I plan to gain at least some basic knowledge of, at least later in life.
For now, however, my goal is to be able to read Dante in the original Italian; read Vergil, Horace, and Cicero in the original Latin; read Homer and the philosophers in the original Greek; be fluent or near-fluent in Portuguese; understand Hayao Miyazaki movies without subititles; and improve my French skills (maybe read some literature) and have some basic knowledge of Arabic and Turkish.
γνῶθι σεαυτόν.
User avatar
footpanda13
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu 13 Aug 2009 10:52 am
Location: Texas, USA

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby Sobekhotep » Fri 11 Dec 2009 12:32 am

footpanda13 wrote:I'm rather new here, and I find this to be a highly interesting thread :)
I am a native Spanish speaker. I was born and raised in Venezuela. At school we studied some English clandestinely, seeing as our teacher figured it would be useful nowadays. To be frank, if English had been an official course, I probably would have flunked. Past "hi," I couldn't really manage much. :oops:
Then the tables turned; my dad was transferred to the USA, and we moved here. I began school here in the fifth grade. Since it's Texas, they have bilingual English-Spanish programs here for limited English speakers. Unfortunately, for reasons I later discovered, my parents decided to put me in full-time English, no bilingual. It was a wreck. I would stay up late doing spelling homework, I would fail all history tests,... you get the idea. :shock: But the suffering lasted only until the fourth month of school, which is when English began to "click." And I'm sure you guys know better than I do about what happens when you're thrown into the ocean to learn to swim, linguistically speaking.
My language ventures were put on hold after my fifth grade year. Sixth grade my English improved exponentially, so I was in honors English by the time I got into the seventh grade. However, seventh grade was when I began studying French. You see, all my life, since about the age of seven, I had wanted to learn Italian. Since they didn't offer it at my school, I decided to take the closest thing-- which I figured was French. Due to my Spanish knowledge, French was a breeze. I kept on studying French for the rest of middle school, and I realized I was very good at it. Then, just last year, I won a huge state French competition as a freshman and received a scholarship to spend three weeks abroad in France during the summer. During this time, my French improved immensely.

This year I am in my fourth year of French (which is a blow-off class for me) and decided to study Latin, simply because there was a hole in my schedule (and I was NOT about to fill it with P.E.... pshh). I figured, "heh, why not?" and signed up for the class. And you would not believe how glad I am I went out on that limb. I have fallen in love with the Latin language and regret not having started it sooner. My Latin teacher has also exposed us to bits of Ancient Greek, and I think it was also love at first sight. I'm definitely planning on learning it at some point.

My friend and I have toyed with Japanese, but I gave up on that rather quickly. I learned the kana, some basic grammar, and around 100 kanji before giving up (stress, AP classes, and other excuses), but I am planning to keep studying at some point in the not-too-distant future and achieving some proficiency and literacy (fluency is not my goal, although I could very easily change my mind about that). My friend, who knows around 2000 kanji by now, will be my inspiration for when I pick Japanese right back up.

I have made some online Brazilian friends, and they have aroused in me an interest in Portuguese. I also have not abandoned my childhood dreams of learning Italian. Although I know I could easily teach myself these languages, I'm hoping to pursue these languages in college as I do my linguistics major, since I want a study concentration that will be interesting, easy, and rewarding. Still, sometimes I can't reach

Aside from that, I find Arabic and Turkish to be beautiful languages that I plan to gain at least some basic knowledge of, at least later in life.
For now, however, my goal is to be able to read Dante in the original Italian; read Vergil, Horace, and Cicero in the original Latin; read Homer and the philosophers in the original Greek; be fluent or near-fluent in Portuguese; understand Hayao Miyazaki movies without subititles; and improve my French skills (maybe read some literature) and have some basic knowledge of Arabic and Turkish.

Welcome to the Omniglot forum!
It's good to see people in high school interested in learning languages.
ለሐዘበ ፡ ዘየደአ
User avatar
Sobekhotep
 
Posts: 714
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 4:53 am
Location: America's Dairyland

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby Talib » Thu 24 Dec 2009 3:17 am

Sobekhotep wrote:It's good to see people in high school interested in learning languages.
That's when I became interested in them, mainly due to the works of Tolkien. I was so engrossed by the idea of his inventing his own languages based entirely on his knowledge of linguistics. After I learned the Tengwar script, I realize conlanging is sort of a dead end in many ways, so I shifted to natural language. I remember one day I sat down with a book and learned the Greek, Arabic, Hebrew and Cyrillic scripts and that was that.
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby formiko » Thu 24 Dec 2009 10:12 am

Talib wrote:I remember one day I sat down with a book and learned the Greek, Arabic, Hebrew and Cyrillic scripts and that was that.

I was the same as you, but I started at age 10 back in 1981. Then I got a Commodore 64 for Christmas a couple of years after that, and my love of languages went on hold for a little while :)
ᏙᏒᏓᎵ ᏗᏑᎶ ᎭᏫ
User avatar
formiko
 
Posts: 404
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:31 am
Location: Angola

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby Dillon D » Thu 14 Jan 2010 6:00 am

Sobekhotep wrote:
Talib wrote:Wow, your high school offered Japanese? That's awesome; mine only had French.

I get that a lot! Actually, during my freshman year my school had Spanish, French, German & Japanese. But by my sophomore year German was gone. Apparently, nobody was taking German so they stopped teaching it.


My friend goes to a charter school of sorts, they only meet on a Friday. I'm a bit envious, they teach Spanish and Russian there!

I wish they taught Irish at the college I'm planning on going to...
My languages:

Native: English
Semi-fluent: Español
Learning: русский язык, Gaeilge
Learning bit by bit: Deutsch
Dabblings: Français, Italiano, Esperanto
Interests: العربية, עברית, Brezhoneg, Cymraeg
User avatar
Dillon D
 
Posts: 47
Joined: Wed 12 Aug 2009 6:44 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby Talib » Sun 17 Jan 2010 5:54 am

Wait, you live in Colorado and you're jealous that his school teaches Spanish? Doesn't every US high school teach it?

By the way you spelled the native name for German wrong, unless Duetsch is some obscure variety I've never heard of.
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby dtp883 » Sun 17 Jan 2010 7:32 am

I thought so too, especially since 10% of Coloradans speak Spanish at home.

One friend from British Columbia and another from Saskatchewan told me that their highschools also teach Spanish. I don't see how a school in Colorado can't teach Spanish. :o
Native: English (NW American)
Advanced: Spanish
Intermediate: French
Beginning: Arabic (MSA/Egyptian)
Some day: German
User avatar
dtp883
 
Posts: 414
Joined: Sat 18 Apr 2009 10:51 pm
Location: San Francisco Area

Re: Your language learning adventures

Postby Dillon D » Sun 17 Jan 2010 9:25 am

Talib wrote:Wait, you live in Colorado and you're jealous that his school teaches Spanish? Doesn't every US high school teach it?

By the way you spelled the native name for German wrong, unless Duetsch is some obscure variety I've never heard of.


No, lol, the Russian part ;)

Ich? Es tut mir leid, I forget how to say 'who' I thought it was wi but Google is telling me wir. Could somebody remind me? Danke schön!
My languages:

Native: English
Semi-fluent: Español
Learning: русский язык, Gaeilge
Learning bit by bit: Deutsch
Dabblings: Français, Italiano, Esperanto
Interests: العربية, עברית, Brezhoneg, Cymraeg
User avatar
Dillon D
 
Posts: 47
Joined: Wed 12 Aug 2009 6:44 pm
Location: Colorado

PreviousNext

Return to Language learning

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests