Koine Greek Grammar

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Koine Greek Grammar

Postby sil_lark » Sat 02 Jan 2010 10:11 pm

What do you think about Koine Greek Grammar? I've been doing a little introductory learning to Koine Greek, and have found that the grammar is by far the most exhausting part of the language, whereas memorizing the vocabulary is the hardest. I think memorizing is hard because the language isn't spoken anymore, so there is really nothing to "hear". I find ancient Greek to have an incredible depth to it considering that one Greek word can mean five different English words. I tend to think that English makes Koine Greek complicated.

What do you think?
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby Delodephius » Sat 02 Jan 2010 11:20 pm

Well, THIS year I'm applying for college and my major is going to be Classical Latin and Greek. So Koine Greek too. I still don't know to which university I'm going to be accepted since I'm applying to two.

I tried a bit of Koine grammar. Since I speak two highly inflected languages myself and one having tones similar to that of Ancient Greek, it isn't so hard for me. But memorizing words is a bit tough, especially those which cannot be directly translated, usually some interjections and prepositions.

I have great motivation to learn it though since I'm interested in Ancient Greek philosophy, especially Stoicism which was popular during the Hellenistic period, right about the high-time of Koine Greek.

Have you visited this website perhaps:
http://www.textkit.com/
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby sil_lark » Sat 02 Jan 2010 11:39 pm

Delodephius wrote:I tried a bit of Koine grammar. Since I speak two highly inflected languages myself and one having tones similar to that of Ancient Greek, it isn't so hard for me.


Are tones and inflections the same? I'm more familiar with Asian languages like Chinese or Thai. Chinese has four tones, and I think Thai has six or seven? But tones in this case may mean that the same word said four different ways in a different tone of voice can lend to a completely different meaning.
一 鸣 惊 人.

Native Language: American English

Second language: 4 years Mandarin Chinese

I've tried: Old English, Hebrew, Biblical Greek, Gothic

I want to learn: Tagolog, Arabic, Biblical Greek, Russian, Vietnamese
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby Talib » Sat 02 Jan 2010 11:52 pm

sil_lark wrote:Are tones and inflections the same? I'm more familiar with Asian languages like Chinese or Thai. Chinese has four tones, and I think Thai has six or seven? But tones in this case may mean that the same word said four different ways in a different tone of voice can lend to a completely different meaning.
No, inflection in this case is a grammatical term. Chinese has very little inflection compared to, say German.
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby Delodephius » Sun 03 Jan 2010 12:04 am

What I meant was that Koine Greek has pitch accent, very similar to Serbo Croatian.
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby Sobekhotep » Sun 03 Jan 2010 6:56 am

I've got a brother studying Koine Greek & he finds it more difficult than Biblical Hebrew! :shock:
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby formiko » Sun 03 Jan 2010 7:06 am

Sobekhotep wrote:I've got a brother studying Koine Greek & he finds it more difficult than Biblical Hebrew! :shock:

I've studied both Koine Greek and Biblical Hebrew at seminary, and I thought Ancient Greek grammar was tougher. More noun cases than the Modern counterpart.
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby Delodephius » Sun 03 Jan 2010 12:18 pm

I personally find languages with no noun cases harder. Cases make more sense to me since I can easily translate into my own language.
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby Talib » Mon 04 Jan 2010 5:11 am

Sobekhotep wrote:I've got a brother studying Koine Greek & he finds it more difficult than Biblical Hebrew! :shock:
Hebrew isn't that bad, although the verbs are kind of complicated and the perfect/imperfect distinction takes some getting used to. But then I was approaching it from the perspective of an Arabic learner so it was already familiar to me.

One thing I wonder is if they teach it with Modern Hebrew pronunciation or the reconstructed ancient pronunciation (and the same for Greek).

Anyway, Greek (any variety) has never interested me much. The grammar is just confusing to me.
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Re: Koine Greek Grammar

Postby Sobekhotep » Tue 05 Jan 2010 12:44 am

Talib wrote:
Sobekhotep wrote:I've got a brother studying Koine Greek & he finds it more difficult than Biblical Hebrew! :shock:
Hebrew isn't that bad, although the verbs are kind of complicated and the perfect/imperfect distinction takes some getting used to. But then I was approaching it from the perspective of an Arabic learner so it was already familiar to me.

One thing I wonder is if they teach it with Modern Hebrew pronunciation or the reconstructed ancient pronunciation

He's being taught to use basically a modern Israeli pronunciation.
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