Nezemeş for beginners!

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Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby shreypete » Sun 04 Oct 2009 1:53 pm

So I've created a new language after quite a lot of planning and devising new lessons. I've done lots of research on the phonology and other aspects of creating a language. Although this language is a bit hard, it becomes easier later (because the grammar is so regular). So I would strongly advise this for those who have already learnt a foreign language before or for those who really want a challenge. However the vocabulary and the word order might be a bit hard. Last but not least, this language is very helpful for those who would like to learn or be familiarized with other Turkic languages/Indo-Persian languages as the grammatical aspects are very similar (of course I will deal with this aspect in future lessons).

Nezemeş is a language that has been derived from the Turkic languages (Turkish, Uzbek, Kazhak), Indo-Persian languages (Hindi, Persian, Tajik, Arabic) and a few words that have been derived from the Slavic (Czech) and Romance languages (Spanish, French).

Grammar: For starters, all you have to know is that the word order is SOV (Subject - Object - Verb). I will also add that this language does sound very beautiful because of the aspect of vowel harmony which will be discussed much later. In the second lesson, I will get more into the syntax and other aspects of the language.

Example:
1) I want to go to the cafe.
Cafetez chahaem jayet.
Literal - cafe-to - I want - to go

I will also add that this language does sound very beautiful because of the aspect of vowel harmony which will be discussed much later. In the second lesson, I will get more into the syntax and other aspects of the language.

Alphabet - The language is comprised of 34 letters.
A Æ B C Ç D E F G Ğ H İ I J K L M N Ñ O Ö P Q R S Ş T Ţ U Ü V X Y Z
a ae b c ç d e f g ğ h i ı j k l m n ñ o ö p q r s ş t ţ u ü v w y z

Pronunciation:
A - a (british pronunciation - as in the word card)
Æ - a (american pronunciation - as in the word cast)
B - be (as in the word bet)
C - je (as in jet)
Ç - che (as in the word chair)
D - de (as in the word delicious)
E - e (as in elm tree)
F - fe (as in fest)
G - ge (as in gear)
Ğ - doesn't have a sound but it's called yordoşak ge
H - ha (as in happy)
İ - uh (as in the e in earth)
I - e (as in ink)
J - je (similar to the C pronunciation but used for foreign words)
K - ka (as in word California)
L - le (as in left)
M - me (as in meddle)
N - ne (as in next)
Ñ - enye (like the spanish niño)
O - o (this letter has 2 pronunciations: 1) O as the word coal and 2) O as in the word college
Ö - similar to the german Ö
P - pe (as in pest)
Q - q (this letter has 2 pronunciations: 1) Q like the c in course and 2) the french Q (qu)
R - er (as in restaurant)
S - se (as in self)
Ş - she (as in shelf)
T - te (as in tell)
Ţ - ts (as in the ts in knots)
U - u (as in full)
Ü - uu like the German Ü
V - ve (as in vest)
X - ix (used in only words of foreign origin)
Y - ye (as in Yerevan)
Z - ze (as in zest)

As you have might have noticed, the letter W doesn't exist in this language.

Lesson 1 - Basic introductions/ Lekţia bire - Tımları bazal
Hello - Hale! (or alo in telephone conversation)
How are you? - Naşıl hoveşti (na-shuhl ho-vesh-ti)
Fine, thank you - Temek, merş (te-mek; mer-sh)
What are you doing? - Ni karzaesh? (nee kar-zae-sh)
Nothing - Kele (ke-le)
Good bye (when you're the one saying it to the person) - Çökün!
Good bye (in response to the good bye said by the person) - Saba!

What - Ni; hange
Why - kenez; neçe
When - kaeb
How - kem; naşıl
How many -kaetnez
Which - keş or kez
Who - kim

I know this was long and I'm sorry for that but I promise to keep it as short as I can in the future. But if you guys are interested in learning more, please let me know so that I can put up more lessons.
Last edited by shreypete on Sun 04 Oct 2009 2:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby shreypete » Sun 04 Oct 2009 1:53 pm

I'm sorry I forget to mention a few features about Nezemeş:
1) it follows an SOV patten (subject - object - verb)
2) nouns, adjectives and sometimes verbs can take on different endings for vowel harmony (which is what gives the language it's mysterious beauty
3) it's a synthetic language, meaning words are constructed using suffixes (and sometimes prefixes), which brings me to my next point.
4) words can be very long at times (eg. anyasahukukeşlarmelgidemlekler which translates to the wrongdoings of constitutional law; this can be broken down:
anyasa - world
hukuk - law
keş - combines hukuk and lar
lar - makes the word law plural - laws
melgide - wrong
m - used for vowerl harmony
lek - thing
ler - makes thing plural - things

5) Finally, if you guys would like to contribute to this language, I would be more than glad to take in your help and add it where ever it's possible.

Just some tongue twisters (not to scare you or anything...think of it as a challenge

Kelezeş seşzekelem zekeledemiş şişe zekelemeş
Derebset aezin kerbezet zeledonyadekket verezeket azetimler
Büçürütük ködın aez ishte bönörömlarününları
For future use, you can copy paste these characters: ÆÇĞIÑÖŞŢÜçğıñöşţü
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby Talib » Sun 04 Oct 2009 6:57 pm

Cool language. I definitely see the Turkic influence.

hukuk - law
This is from Arabic حقوق meaning "rights", correct?
Q - q (this letter has 2 pronunciations: 1) Q like the c in course and 2) the french Q (qu)
There's a difference?
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby rickardspaghetti » Sun 04 Oct 2009 7:23 pm

Talib wrote:
Q - q (this letter has 2 pronunciations: 1) Q like the c in course and 2) the french Q (qu)
There's a difference?

Maybe the latter is labialized?
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby Talib » Sun 04 Oct 2009 7:39 pm

rickardspaghetti wrote:
Talib wrote:
Q - q (this letter has 2 pronunciations: 1) Q like the c in course and 2) the french Q (qu)
There's a difference?

Maybe the latter is labialized?
But it's not in those words...
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby Sushika » Sun 04 Oct 2009 8:02 pm

shreypete wrote:1) I want to go to the cafe.
Cafetez chahaem jayet.


shreypete wrote:C - je (as in jet)


So are we expected to pronounce "cafetez" /dZafetez/? :shock: Or maybe you'd better change it into "kafetez"? ;)

P.S.: what's the pronunciation of the cluster "ch"? Is it an alternative writing for "ç"?
Currently learning Turkish. Good luck to me.
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby shreypete » Sun 04 Oct 2009 8:16 pm

I apologize for my spelling as well as grammatical errors :oops:

The suffix "em" means "to"; and it's not cafe but kafe as Sushika pointed out; it would otherwise change the entire pronunciation...and finally regarding ch. It's technically ç (called che and the accent mark is called a sedila derived form the French sedille; also used in Turkish), but I figure it would be easier to write ch (as ç isn't found on most keyboards) if desired. You can do the same with ş (sh) and ñ (nye), but the other special letters are fixed (ie. ţ,ğ,ñ,ü,ı) So it's:

kafetez çahaem (or chahaem) jayet.
Literal translation - cafe-to - i like-go
Pronunciation - kafe-tez chaw-ham - jaw-yet

Regarding the q, it doesn't make much of a difference in the written language. Only very few words have the french q pronunciation (and I mean very very few of them.) The french q is different from the american q in that it's sharper and longer. Anyways you can use either, it's fine.

I'm so sorry again and thank you Sushika for pointing out the errors.
Last edited by shreypete on Sun 04 Oct 2009 9:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby shreypete » Sun 04 Oct 2009 8:26 pm

Lekţia ikki
Şaemben 1-21 (birem yermeben) - Numbers 1-21

0 - sıfıret
1 - bire
2 - ikki
3 - terş
4 - çaehar
5 - beşe
6 - altıla
7 - yetme
8 - haeft
9 - haeşt
10 - dou
11 - bireben (ben is a suffix that adds an extra one to the number)
12 - ikkiben
13 - terşebin (note: ten has changed to tin due to vowel harmony)
14 - çaeharben
15 - beşebin
16 - altılabin
17 - yetmebin
18 - haefben
19 - haeşbin
20 - yerme
21 - yermeben


Pronumeşe - Pronouns
I - baen
You (informal) - to
He/She/It - o (long o as in the oo in food)
We - ma (the a sounds like that in Malta)
You (formal) - siz
They - eşun

Basic principles of verbs - elveilerı bazalkön fiie
ALL verbs end in either "mek", "mak" or "mik"
Examples:
Baegmek - to run
Kaerdmek - to do

Çaelışmak - to try
Dekmak - to watch

Paedmik - to read
Sevmik - to love

The conjugations are very similar (but some of the endings may change due to vowel harmony at times). What do I mean my vowel harmony? It's the changing or adding of vowels to a word to make it sound more mellifluous . I'll get to this in a later lesson.

Conjugations:
"mek"
maen Baegmen
to Baegmeş
o Baeg
ma Baegemüz (here the ü is an example of vowel harmony)
siz Baegesünüz (ü again shows vowel harmony)
eşun Baegaend

"mak"
maen Çaelışmaen
to Çaelışmaş
o Çael
ma Çaelışemiz
siz Çaelışesinız
eşun Çaelaend

"mik"
maen Paedmin
to Paedmiş
o Paed
ma Paedemuz
siz Paedesiniz
eşun Paedaend


Examples:
1) I am going to the supermarket to buy some bread and vegetables - maen supermarketem beraz etmeksen saebze kharidmen (literally - I - supermarket -to (denoted by suffix "em") - some - bread - and (denoted by suffix "sen") - vegetables - buying/going to buy (the present tense and present progressive/continuous are one and the same; and the verb here is an "mek" verb - kharidmek); in most cases, the subjects can be omitted (so you can omit maen).

2) When did you call me? - Kaeb (to) taelifonilişmen? (literally - when - you called-to me (denoted by suffix "men" which means me). Here the verb is an "mik" verb - taelifonmik and it's in the past tense; here as you might have noticed, the subject has been omitted.

3) Why do you still speak to him when he did that to you? - Kenez (to) bolaendişön kaebez (o) kaerdeleten? (literally: why - you speak - to him (denoted by suffix "ön") - when (here when is used to connect the sentence which is denoted by "ez") - he did that - to you (denoted by suffix "ten" or to you). Here there are two verbs: bolaendmik - to speak (in the present tense) and kaerdmek - to do which is in the past tense (kaerdel - he/she/it did; add a "t" and it becomes that...so kaerdelet - he did that and finally add the suffix "ten" and it becomes kaerdelet (or he did that-to you).

As you can see, suffixed are only added to nouns and verbs. A simple rule: when there is a preposition following or preceding a noun or a verb, you always add the suffix corresponding to that preposition to either that noun of verb preceding it.

And the general sentence pattern (syntax) when interrogative pronouns are involved:
Q (question word) - (S) - O - V (as you can see, in Nezemeş, the personal pronouns can be omitted in most cases; it is only added to avoid confusion in long sentences).

And when there is a conjunction, then the order is (S) - O - V - C (conj.) - (S) - O - V

Now add an interrogative to the previous pattern and the syntax is Q - (s) - O - V - C - (S) - O - V

Et voila! it's done. I hope it wasn't too complicated. Once you can see the pattern, it becomes really easy but of course, getting a hang of it takes some time. In the next lesson, I will cover a few of the suffixes which indicate prepositions. And I will introduce the "mysterious" concept of vowel harmony (often seen in many Central Asian languages.)
Last edited by shreypete on Sun 04 Oct 2009 9:07 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby shreypete » Sun 04 Oct 2009 8:32 pm

Talib wrote:Cool language. I definitely see the Turkic influence.

hukuk - law
This is from Arabic حقوق meaning "rights", correct?
Q - q (this letter has 2 pronunciations: 1) Q like the c in course and 2) the french Q (qu)
There's a difference?


Yes, it does :) (Unfortunately, I cannot entirely read Arabic). In Turkish, Uighur, Kazhak and Uzbek, it means "law".

Hukuk is typically used in very formal situations or used to describe a very important law. The common word is kaenun, also meaning law.

so Hukuk and Kaenun mean the same thing. So you've learnt two new words already :) (one derived form Arabic and Turkish, while the other derived from Persian).
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby shreypete » Sun 04 Oct 2009 9:41 pm

shreypete wrote:Pronumeşe - Pronouns
I - baen
You (informal) - to
He/She/It - o (long o as in the oo in food)
We - ma (the a sounds like that in Malta)
You (formal) - siz
They - eşun


I forgot to point out that she means: one (pronounced o-ne)

So he = on; she = one; it = o


Conjugations:
"mek"
maen Baegmen
to Baegmeş
o Baeg
ma Baegemüz (here the ü is an example of vowel harmony)
siz Baegesünüz (ü again shows vowel harmony)
eşun Baegaend


on/o Baeg but one Baegi

"mak"
maen Çaelışmaen
to Çaelışmaş
o Çael
ma Çaelışemiz
siz Çaelışesinız
eşun Çaelaend


on/o Çael but one Çaeli

"mik"
maen Paedmin
to Paedmiş
o Paed
ma Paedemuz
siz Paedesiniz
eşun Paedaend


on/o Paed but one Paedi

As you can see, suffixes are only added to nouns and verbs. A simple rule: when there is a preposition following or preceding a noun or a verb, you always add the suffix (corresponding to that preposition) to either the noun or verb preceding it.


Eg. I want to go to the movies.
Kinem çahaem (the suffix "em" denoting "to" is appended to the conjugated verb çahaem)

Eg. I met the Duke of Normandy.
Melilaen Hercenukezh Normaeñede. (the suffix "ezh" denoting "of" is appended to the noun Duke). However, there are other suffixes that can mean "of" depending on the context.

Eg. His uncle sat under the tree all day long.
Ţreydehoş baetelhalinde heruz ozen. (the possessive pronoun his, denoted by "hoş" is appended to the noun "ţrey" or "uncle"; the preposition "halinde", meaning under" is appended to the fonjugated verb baetel (he/it sat); finally day means ruz and all means "her" - so in this case, there is a prefix attached to the noun - heruz (one r is deleted as a double letter cannot exist.)
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