English cursive

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Re: English cursive

Postby Declan » Sun 27 Sep 2009 4:32 pm

Serali wrote:Reminds me of Sütterlin.

All comes ultimately from the same idea.
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Very good: Irish
Reasonable: German, French
Very basic: Latin.
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Re: English cursive

Postby Serali » Sun 27 Sep 2009 8:27 pm

I thought that is was something like that.

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Re: English cursive

Postby sokuban » Fri 02 Oct 2009 2:08 pm

Reminds me of Kurrentschift.

Wait, maybe it is Kurrentschrift—it looks almost the same.
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Re: English cursive

Postby Delodephius » Fri 02 Oct 2009 6:04 pm

It is Kurrentschift. The form used in Bohemia if I'm not mistaken.
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Re: English cursive

Postby Serali » Fri 02 Oct 2009 11:33 pm

Delodephius wrote:It is Kurrentschift. The form used in Bohemia if I'm not mistaken.


Is it still in use?

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Re: English cursive

Postby Delodephius » Sat 03 Oct 2009 7:25 am

No, here is how it evolved though:
Image
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Re: English cursive

Postby Serali » Sat 03 Oct 2009 8:23 am

*_*

That is simply beautiful!

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Re: English cursive

Postby gsteemso » Sat 03 Oct 2009 5:40 pm

Seeing those uppercase G’s reminds me of something. My great-grandmother, who was born in 1901, came over from Sweden to Canada circa 1925. I don’t know where she learnt them, but her uppercase G’s had these really beautiful loopy patterns, like a cloverleaf but thinner. I’ve been trying to remember how she did them for years, but without success. Does anyone here know what I’m talking about? (If it’s relevant, my mom learnt her G’s in the 1960s at New Westminster, BC; they resembled the one on the General Mills cereal box logo.)
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Re: English cursive

Postby sokuban » Sun 04 Oct 2009 7:52 pm

I dunno, but I write my uppercase Gs like those ones up there. (I copied to from my mom, grandparents, etc.) My last name starts with a G, so I use it a lot. (I don't like the normal cursive G they teach now—it looks ugly.)

I still remember annoying elementary school cursive teachers by refusing to write capital G the D'Nealian way.

Now that I think about it, I write a lot of my capital letters differently from standard English cursive. In general I hate it when capital letters are simply a larger version of the lowercase letters—especially when the printed form looks different.

a, m, n, u, w, y, z are prime culprits - I write all except u and y in a different way. (I can't think of a good way to write u and y in a different way. Any ideas anyone?)

Another cursive capital letter I don't like is E. I like my Es to have at least some sort of blockiness to it, not completely round like in D'Nealian—it looks like a lower case epsilon—ah, that might be why I don't like it, it goes with my other no capital should be a bigger version of a lowercase rule (Some people write their lowercase 'e's to look like epsilons). I usually end up writing my Es in a different way each time when I have to write them, and try to avoid the D'Nealian E.

M I haven't fully decided on yet either. Right now I write it like a handwritten lowercase mu, but if there was a better way to do it I'd be glad to know.
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Re: English cursive

Postby Delodephius » Sun 04 Oct 2009 9:39 pm

I looked up that D'Nealian you mention and it looks strange to me, nothing like I've seen before. I was taught in school pretty much like the final rows in the above picture I posted, although some letters like upper case S can vary, it can be written like the printed version as well and I write it as such when writing Slovak or English, while in Serbian class we were taught to write the S like the one above and I write it as such when writing in Serbian.
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