Linguistic universals.

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Linguistic universals.

Postby SpareSymbol » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:03 pm

The following questions apply to natural human languages, living and extinct only.

What parts of speech are universal?

What grammatical categories(tense, case, aspect, et cetera) are universal?

What sounds are universal?

Thanks in advance.
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby rickardspaghetti » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:05 pm

SpareSymbol wrote:The following questions apply to natural human languages, living and extinct only.

What parts of speech are universal?

What grammatical categories(tense, case, aspect, et cetera) are universal?

What sounds are universal?

Thanks in advance.

Oh god. This cannot end well. :|
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby SpareSymbol » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:09 pm

rickardspaghetti wrote:
SpareSymbol wrote:The following questions apply to natural human languages, living and extinct only.

What parts of speech are universal?

What grammatical categories(tense, case, aspect, et cetera) are universal?

What sounds are universal?

Thanks in advance.

Oh god. This cannot end well. :|


Why will it not end well? :?
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby rickardspaghetti » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:16 pm

Cuz I don't know the universals. :cry:
Joking dude(about it not ending well. I still don't know the universals). :P It's not a bad question, but it is an often asked question. As far as I know there are not many universals since all languages are different. One thing I'm quite certain of though is that there are no universal sounds. More than that I cannot help you.
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby SpareSymbol » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:33 pm

rickardspaghetti wrote:Cuz I don't know the universals. :cry:
Joking dude(about it not ending well. I still don't know the universals). :P It's not a bad question, but it is an often asked question. As far as I know there are not many universals since all languages are different. One thing I'm quite certain of though is that there are no universal sounds. More than that I cannot help you.



No universal sounds? :?

I thought surely there would be a few vowel sounds that are universal. Huh. :?

By the way I have read French does not have a progressive aspect, is this true? How does a Francophone express the idea of an ongoing action?

(I am for the most part a monolingual Anglophone at this time.)
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby Talib » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:38 pm

You're terribly misinformed, my friend - there are plenty of linguistic universals as a cursory search of Google will tell you.
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby rickardspaghetti » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:41 pm

SpareSymbol wrote:No universal sounds? :?

I thought surely there would be a few vowel sounds that are universal. Huh. :?

There are some that are very usual to find in a language. i and velar consonants are the best examples, but there are languages that don't have them. a is a letter used in every natlang orthography, but the realization of a is often different from language to language. It can be /a/, /A/, /Q/, /@/, /{/, /6/ or /V/, but never the same for every language.
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby rickardspaghetti » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:42 pm

Talib wrote:You're terribly misinformed, my friend - there are plenty of linguistic universals as a cursory search of Google will tell you.

Well, at least I'm not misinformed by choice. :roll:
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby rickardspaghetti » Fri 11 Sep 2009 11:47 pm

SpareSymbol wrote:By the way I have read French does not have a progressive aspect, is this true? How does a Francophone express the idea of an ongoing action?

There are many languages lacking a progressive aspect. Swedish has none for example and we use the aorist regardless of the action being progressive or not. "I eat" and "I'm eating" translate the same in Swedish. As for French lacking progressive aspect, I don't know.
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。
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Re: Linguistic universals.

Postby dtp883 » Sat 12 Sep 2009 12:10 am

rickardspaghetti wrote:
SpareSymbol wrote:By the way I have read French does not have a progressive aspect, is this true? How does a Francophone express the idea of an ongoing action?

There are many languages lacking a progressive aspect. Swedish has none for example and we use the aorist regardless of the action being progressive or not. "I eat" and "I'm eating" translate the same in Swedish. As for French lacking progressive aspect, I don't know.

That's pretty much the same as in French.

Je mange.
I eat.
I'm eating.

Spanish has a present progressive tense but it's not used as much as in English.
Hablo.
I talk.
I'm talking.
EDIT:
Oh yeah, I'm pretty sure that Early Modern English did not use the progressive tense.

"Forgive them Father for they know not what they do."
"Father forgive them because they don't know what they are doing."
Native: English (NW American)
Advanced: Spanish
Intermediate: French
Beginning: Arabic (MSA/Egyptian)
Some day: German
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