Omniglot on YouTube!

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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Talib » Sat 25 Jul 2009 4:39 am

Sobekhotep wrote:Really? I've heard horror stories about how complicated Dutch grammar is! :)
I've heard many about German grammar, but not Dutch.

I think it feels familiar, like rereading an old book. The syntax is a lot like English.
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Sobekhotep » Mon 27 Jul 2009 4:39 am

Talib wrote:
Sobekhotep wrote:Really? I've heard horror stories about how complicated Dutch grammar is! :)
I've heard many about German grammar, but not Dutch.

I think it feels familiar, like rereading an old book. The syntax is a lot like English.

Perhaps I was misinformed.
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Talib » Mon 27 Jul 2009 5:57 pm

I don't know, my Belgian friend is a fluent speaker and he's translated back and forth to demonstrate how similar the two languages can be (with cognates, loans etc.). I don't think it is a very difficult language for Anglophones, except maybe the phonology.
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Sobekhotep » Tue 28 Jul 2009 1:04 am

Talib wrote:I don't think it is a very difficult language for Anglophones, except maybe the phonology.

Yeah, I think [œy] will be tricky!
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Dennis » Fri 28 Aug 2009 6:26 pm

Heh... I never heard an Anglophone pronounce Dutch so, that he/she sounded somewhat native. The 'g' is fine, they master most of the vocals (which gives away a clue already), but they all pronounce the 'r' as in English. Or they finish words like 'sneed (means cut (past tense))' with a d, while native speakers never end words with voiced consonants (what we say, sounds more like 'sneet')

And I'd say people master [œʏ̯] before [øʏ̯] though.

Thai sounds beautiful, but that 'r' kills it.
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Sobekhotep » Sun 30 Aug 2009 5:06 am

Dennis wrote:Thai sounds beautiful, but that 'r' kills it.

Oh? You don't like the alveolar trill?
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Talib » Sun 30 Aug 2009 5:40 am

What I don't get about Thai is the orthography. Why denote tone with a combination of homophone letters, vowel length and tone markers when they can just use the diacritics that already exist? Then they could cut down on half of the letters used and spelling would be a lot easier to learn and transliterate.

As far as I know, history the only reason these letters are kept.
Sobekhotep wrote:Oh? You don't like the alveolar trill?
Maybe he has difficulty pronouncing it. A lot of Anglophones do.
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Sobekhotep » Mon 31 Aug 2009 12:21 am

Talib wrote:What I don't get about Thai is the orthography. Why denote tone with a combination of homophone letters, vowel length and tone markers when they can just use the diacritics that already exist? Then they could cut down on half of the letters used and spelling would be a lot easier to learn and transliterate.

It is pretty chaotic, isn't it?

Talib wrote:
Sobekhotep wrote:Oh? You don't like the alveolar trill?
Maybe he has difficulty pronouncing it. A lot of Anglophones do.

But isn't he a native Dutch speaker?
What do you call Dutch speakers using the -phone form? Batavophone? :?
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby ILuvEire » Mon 31 Aug 2009 2:36 am

Sobekhotep wrote:
Talib wrote:What I don't get about Thai is the orthography. Why denote tone with a combination of homophone letters, vowel length and tone markers when they can just use the diacritics that already exist? Then they could cut down on half of the letters used and spelling would be a lot easier to learn and transliterate.

It is pretty chaotic, isn't it?

Yeah, that's the only thing keeping me from dabbling with thai. :D

Talib wrote:
Sobekhotep wrote:Oh? You don't like the alveolar trill?
Maybe he has difficulty pronouncing it. A lot of Anglophones do.

But isn't he a native Dutch speaker?
What do you call Dutch speakers using the -phone form? Batavophone? :?

Isn't it a Beneluxophone or something like that?
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Re: Omniglot on YouTube!

Postby Talib » Mon 31 Aug 2009 4:02 am

Sobekhotep wrote:But isn't he a native Dutch speaker?
Depending on dialect, Dutch speakers use a lot of different rhotics. Some use a uvular sound like in German.
What do you call Dutch speakers using the -phone form? Batavophone? :?
What word is this derived from?
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