Hola a todo.

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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Kotoba_Azul » Mon 27 Jul 2009 3:10 am

Neqitan wrote:Está bien, está bien...

"Jaja, ¿y tú?" is the best way to write it for a forum.


Aprendo algo nuevo cada el día. :)
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby formiko » Mon 27 Jul 2009 3:58 am

Sobekhotep wrote:I live in Southeastern Wisconsin. I'm guessing you'd recommend Potawatomi, Ojibwe &/or Winnebago?


I would have also added Fox to that list. Both Fox and Winnebago have a interesting writing system, and there are about 2,000 speakers and Ojibwe is too "common" :)
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Sobekhotep » Mon 27 Jul 2009 4:37 am

Aeetlrcreejl wrote:I guess I should learn Tonkawa, Comanche, or Lipan Apache. Of those, the only one that isn't extinct is Comanche.

Comanche is cool. Although I have no clue what a voicless/devoiced vowel could be...

formiko wrote:
Sobekhotep wrote:I live in Southeastern Wisconsin. I'm guessing you'd recommend Potawatomi, Ojibwe &/or Winnebago?

I would have also added Fox to that list. Both Fox and Winnebago have a interesting writing system, and there are about 2,000 speakers and Ojibwe is too "common" :)

"Common" means more people who speak it! :P
Right, I forgot about Fox.
You're right: the Winnebago alphabet is interesting. It kinda looks Slavic! I think Winnebago would be the language I'd learn although I'm not sure what kind of grammar it has.
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby linguoboy » Mon 27 Jul 2009 4:48 am

Sobekhotep wrote:
Aeetlrcreejl wrote:I guess I should learn Tonkawa, Comanche, or Lipan Apache. Of those, the only one that isn't extinct is Comanche.

Comanche is cool. Although I have no clue what a voicless/devoiced vowel could be...

Japanese is full of them. English has them, too: When you whisper, every sound you make is devoiced. English /h/ can also be thought of as a voiceless vowel which adopts of the quality of the sound immediately following.
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby formiko » Mon 27 Jul 2009 9:16 am

Sobekhotep wrote:I think Winnebago would be the language I'd learn although I'm not sure what kind of grammar it has.

Of all Amerindian languages, Siouan languages are the easiest, and Salishan languages are the most difficult. (like Squamish, Bella Coola, Lushootseed)
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby dtp883 » Mon 27 Jul 2009 9:21 am

This is going to make me sound bad, but why do most of you want to learn languages that have less than 2000 speakers? I mean unless you were to move somewhere where it is spoken, or to marry someone who speaks it, or a linguist doing research, or what not, it seems pretty useless. Especially when languages such as French or Japanese are claimed to raise your paycheck while obscure Native American languages wouldn't.

And if you learn a language like that it would be more likely for you to forget it. I don't understand why you'd want to expend time on something you would use rarely, and wouldn't really help you in life.

*I guess I could understand it if it wasn't a primary focus.
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby linguoboy » Mon 27 Jul 2009 3:08 pm

formiko wrote:
Sobekhotep wrote:I think Winnebago would be the language I'd learn although I'm not sure what kind of grammar it has.

Of all Amerindian languages, Siouan languages are the easiest, and Salishan languages are the most difficult. (like Squamish, Bella Coola, Lushootseed)

You've learned all Amerindian languages?

I would think the easiest by far would be linguas francas such as Mobilian Jargon (based on Muskogean, mainly Chickasaw) and Chinook Jargon (based on Chinookan).

dtp883 wrote:Especially when languages such as French or Japanese are claimed to raise your paycheck while obscure Native American languages wouldn't.

They raise your potential earnings, but not much more than that. I don't make a dime more in my current position despite regularly making use of other languages I've learned, such as Chinese, Japanese, and Persian.
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Sobekhotep » Tue 28 Jul 2009 12:56 am

linguoboy wrote:
Sobekhotep wrote:
Aeetlrcreejl wrote:I guess I should learn Tonkawa, Comanche, or Lipan Apache. Of those, the only one that isn't extinct is Comanche.

Comanche is cool. Although I have no clue what a voicless/devoiced vowel could be...

Japanese is full of them. English has them, too: When you whisper, every sound you make is devoiced.

Oh, that's what a voiceless vowel is! OK, I can do those. :D

dtp883 wrote:This is going to make me sound bad, but why do most of you want to learn languages that have less than 2000 speakers? I mean unless you were to move somewhere where it is spoken, or to marry someone who speaks it, or a linguist doing research, or what not, it seems pretty useless. Especially when languages such as French or Japanese are claimed to raise your paycheck while obscure Native American languages wouldn't.

And if you learn a language like that it would be more likely for you to forget it. I don't understand why you'd want to expend time on something you would use rarely, and wouldn't really help you in life.

*I guess I could understand it if it wasn't a primary focus.

I'm with you. As cool as it would be for me to be able to speak Winnebago or Menominee there's no realistic use for it. That's precisely why I'm not going to learn any of those Native American languages since I'd never use any anyway.
All the languages I'm committed to learning I will use regularly.
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Neqitan » Tue 28 Jul 2009 2:27 am

Sobekhotep wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Sobekhotep wrote:Comanche is cool. Although I have no clue what a voicless/devoiced vowel could be...

Japanese is full of them. English has them, too: When you whisper, every sound you make is devoiced.

Oh, that's what a voiceless vowel is! OK, I can do those. :D

Of course you can! [h] IS a voiceless a vowel! That thing about calling [h] a "glottal" consonant is just for working purposes, the tongue really takes the place of the following vowel (if any), though it doesn't contrast words unless the tongue creates more frication with things like [x].

Well, vowels aren't treated as "palatal", "palato-velar", and "velar" but as "front", "central" and "back" for similar reasons, they just don't behave like consonants...
Kotoba_Azul wrote:
Neqitan wrote:Está bien, está bien...

"Jaja, ¿y tú?" is the best way to write it for a forum.


Aprendo algo nuevo cada el día. :)

The correct expression for "everyday/each day" is "cada día". Also: "todos los días" (everyday), but in this environment using "cada día" is better since you emphasize that EACH day you become a little closer to being profficient.

Aprendo algo nuevo cada día.

:)
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Re: Hola a todo.

Postby formiko » Tue 28 Jul 2009 5:22 am

linguoboy wrote:You've learned all Amerindian languages?

No,but for the past 20 years Amerindian languages have been my primary focus. My doctorate was even on an Athapaskan language! True languae lovers have a passion for languages. It wouldn't matter if you were learning Uyghur or Seminole. Languages are also one of the greatest gifts God has given us.

I've studied or done research on almost every language family in North America and a few is SA.
So, from my experience, Siouan languages are the easiest for an English speaker and Salishan languages are the hardest for ANYBODY :)
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