New alphabet for english.

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New alphabet for english.

Postby locuroso » Wed 17 Jun 2009 7:37 pm

'Hello I had decided I was sick of using the old English alphabet and came up with a new, more phonetic one. I have already used a program for windows and created the keyboard layout. Here is the alphabet:

Aa- always pronounced like the 'a' in pan.
Áá- always pronounced like the 'a' tall or the 'au' in automobile or the 'o' in knot.
Bb- unchanged.
Cc- always pronounced like the 'ch' in church, never makes the 'k' sound like in can, or the 's' sound in ace, or the 'sh' sound in oc[i]ean.
Dd- unchanged.
Ðđ- 'eth' always pronounced like the soft 'th' sound like in [i]th
e or this.
Ee- always pronounced like the 'e' in bet or set.
Éé- 'ay' always pronounced like 'ay' in day.
Ɛɛ- always makes the 'e', 'o', or 'u' sound before an 'r' like in lover, or urn, or word.
Ff- unchanged, but replaces all 'ph' combinations line in telephone, or the 'gh' combination in enough.
Gg- always makes the hard 'g' sound in game never used to make the ‘j’ sound like in gem, or the French ‘j’ sound in beige.
Hh- unchanged but never silent.
Ii- Always pronounced like the ‘i’ sound in internet, never like the ‘i’ sound in time.
Íí- always makes the long ‘e’ sound in scene or in spleen.
Jj- always makes the ‘j’ sound in jacket, replaces all soft ‘g’ sounds like in gem.
Kk- always Makes all ‘k’ sounds like in kill, replaces all hard ‘c’, ‘ch’, ‘ck’ and ‘q’ sounds like in can, chlorine, and quick.
Ll- unchanged.
Mm- unchanged.
Nn- Unchanged.
Oo- always makes the long ‘o’ sound in snow or in boat.
Ѳѳ- always makes the unstressed vowel sound in lava, fun, or love.
Pp- unchanged.
Qq- Obsolete.
Rr- unchanged, however no more doubled r's.
Ss- always makes all ‘s’ sound like in soon and replaces all soft ‘c’ sounds like in ceiling. Never pronounced like ‘s’ in pleasure, or ‘s’ in please.
Tt- unchanged.
Þð- Always makes the hard ‘th’ sound in thorn.
Uu- always makes all the long ‘u’ sounds like in dew, due, or do.
Ʊʊ- always makes all short ‘u’ sounds like in book or look.
Vv- unchanged.
Ww- unchanged, but Replaces the ‘w’ sound made by ‘u’ in quick.
Xx- 'sh' always makes the ‘sh’ sound in shop.
Yy- always makes the ‘y’ sound in you, never used as a vowel.
Zz- unchanged.
Źź- always makes the French ‘j’ sound in pleasure.
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby linguoboy » Wed 17 Jun 2009 7:49 pm

Áá- always pronounced like the 'a' tall or the 'au' in automobile or the 'o' in knot.

Here's your first problem--and one that any spelling reformer has to grapple with sooner or later--and that's that I have different vowel sounds in tall and knot. And so do tens of millions of other English speakers. (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_English_low_back_vowels for more details.)
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby locuroso » Wed 17 Jun 2009 9:48 pm

you're absolutely right. Originally I had two seperate 'au' sounds the one I have in this post with the accented 'a' and one with an accented 'o'. The problem was I lost the original copy of it. I figure I deleted it by mistake. I didn't realize I had left it out until it was too late. I will put it in but I had just finished making the custom keyboard map for my computer and was so thrilled with it and full of excitement that I finally figured out how to do it that I forgot about the 2nd 'au' sound. Some even argue that there are as many as 3 different 'au' sounds from what I've heard. I am from the east coast of Canada and some people here also maintain the 2 two different ones, but I've never heard the 3rd one being used. Would you happen to know of it linguoboy?
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby Talib » Wed 17 Jun 2009 10:36 pm

linguoboy wrote:Áá- always pronounced like the 'a' tall or the 'au' in automobile or the 'o' in knot.

Here's your first problem--and one that any spelling reformer has to grapple with sooner or later--and that's that I have different vowel sounds in tall and knot. And so do tens of millions of other English speakers. (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_English_low_back_vowels for more details.)
And I have the same sound for both of them, but it's not the sound you're describing - and I'm from Canada too.

I have tried many times to make a new orthography for English and I'm convinced it's a fruitless endeavour. The regional variation is too great.
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby linguoboy » Wed 17 Jun 2009 11:10 pm

locuroso wrote:Some even argue that there are as many as 3 different 'au' sounds from what I've heard. I am from the east coast of Canada and some people here also maintain the 2 two different ones, but I've never heard the 3rd one being used. Would you happen to know of it linguoboy?

RP distinguishes /ɔː/ (as in thought), /ɑː/ (as in father), and /ɒ/ (as in lot). American English speakers (including most eastern Canadians) who merge cot and caught generally have /ɑ/ for both. I personally distinguish /ɑ/ (father, lot, cot) from /ɒ/ (thought, caught). Where I'm living (Chicago), however, there's a vowel shift underway which moves /ɑ/ forward to /a/ (or even /æ/) and then drags /ɒ/ into the /ɑ/ slot.
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby locuroso » Wed 17 Jun 2009 11:24 pm

Yes the regional variation is very high in English, but I'm going to try it anyways. It's mostly for me anyways. I just want an easier way to spell things. I'm tired of all these different ways to spell words so I wanted to go for a more phonetic approach.

Also I have added the ó in addition to the á. I havenɛt figured out how to edit my posts so I am just going to state it here. From now on 'á' will be used for the 'au' sound in both father and caught. While 'ó' will be used for all other 'au' sounds.

Also here are some diphthongs:

ai- always pronounced like 'i' in spine.
ei- always pronounced like 'i' in spike or like.
oi- always pronounced like 'oy' in boy.
au- always pronounced like 'ow' in down.
ou- always pronounced like 'ou' in out.
ng- will stay the same.
gz- will replace the 'gs' sound in eggs. Or the 'x' sound in exit.
ks- will replace the 'x' sound in tax.
ts- is always prounced like 'ts' sound in bits or like 'ts' sound in bites.
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby Sean of the Dead » Wed 17 Jun 2009 11:28 pm

Maybe you should learn IPA, since for me "down" and "out" have the same vowel. ;) :roll:
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby locuroso » Wed 17 Jun 2009 11:35 pm

There is also no need of double conconants such as: dd, tt, ll, rr, ss and so on. With the exception of g: for instance English can be pronounced with or without the 'g' sound. (either a nasal 'e' sound followed by an 'n', or the nasal 'e' sound followed by an 'ng') So with the new spelling English can be spelled either: Ínglix or Íngglix, depending on how you pronounce the word.

Also all nouns are now capitalized, except pronouns so 'I' would become 'ai' and 'eye' would become 'Ai'.

Hír ór đѳ Déz ѳv đѳ Wík/ Here are the days of the week:

Mѳndé, Tuzdé, Wenzdé, Þɛrzdé, Fraidé, Satɛrdé and Sѳndé.
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday.

The apostraphe is still used to show possession. Ex: Dógz dogs and Dóg'z/Dógz' dog's/dogs'.
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby locuroso » Wed 17 Jun 2009 11:38 pm

Sean of the Dead wrote:Maybe you should learn IPA, since for me "down" and "out" have the same vowel. ;) :roll:


Good point. Man the English language is very much full of regional dialects. Do you know any good sources where I could learn it? The ones on wikipedia, that I have found at least don't give any examples of the sounds, therefore it's useless to me. Things like aveo-frontal has no meaning to me whatsoever.
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Re: New alphabet for english.

Postby linguoboy » Wed 17 Jun 2009 11:50 pm

Sean of the Dead wrote:Maybe you should learn IPA, since for me "down" and "out" have the same vowel.

Because you don't have Canadian raising in your speech, you poor deprived soul.

This is Major Problem #2 with the orthography, IMHO: It's phonetic in some areas where it should be phonemic. The only time these diphthongs contrast is before an alveolar tap from /d/ or /t/. That is, some speakers distinguish rider from writer not by the medial consonant but from the quality of the stressed vowels alone. But since locuroso doesn't include a symbol for the tap, he presumably doesn't have it or is writing it as d or t, so there are no minimal pairs and, thus, no need for distinctive spellings.

The ones on wikipedia, that I have found at least don't give any examples of the sounds, therefore it's useless to me. Things like aveo-frontal has no meaning to me whatsoever.

Where have you been looking? If you search a particular term (say "alveolar tap"), you'll be taken to an article with examples from a wide variety of languages. On top of that, the article on IPA contains links to several sites with sound files.

The sooner you start learning IPA, the more and better resources you'll be able to take advantage of. It's not too often when a global standard is this deeply entrenched.
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