Latino Volgaro

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Latino Volgaro

Postby locuroso » Mon 01 Jun 2009 8:11 pm

Before I present this language I have a few things I'd like to state:
1. This language is an attempt to recreate Vulgar Latin, if it still existed today.
2. I am not familiar with the IPA format or any others, so bear with me on the alphabet
3. The language is supposed to resemble modern Romance Languages, as I stated this language is what I feel Vulgar Latin would look like if it still existed today, therefore there would be some borrowings from romance.

With that said here is the alphabet, in brackets is the name of each letter as they would be said orally:

Aa (a)- pronounced like 'a' in father, or like 'a' in man, it is unstressed on the end of words.
Bb (be)- just like english 'b' in bat.
Cc (ce)- before 'i' and 'e' it is prounced as 'ch' in march, before any other vowel it is pronounced as 'k' in kitten.
Ci (ci)- this is used to make the 'ch' sound when it is used in front of other vowels.
Dd (de)- pronounced like ‘d’ in dog, never like ‘d’ in drill.
Ee (e)- pronounced like ‘ay’ in day, or like ‘e’ in better.
Ff (fe)- pronounced like ‘f’ in fade.
Gg (ge)- before ‘i’ and ‘e’ it is pronounced like ‘j’ in juice, before all other vowels it is pronounced as hard ‘g’ in great.
Gi (gi)- used to make the ‘j’ sound before other vowels.
Hh (ha)- always pronounced like English ‘h’ in home, never silent.
Ii (i)- pronounced like ‘ee’ in feet, or ‘i’ in internet, never used as ‘i’ in onion, or in Italian io.
Jj (jota)- always pronounced like ‘y’ in young, never used as a vowel.
Ll (le)- same as in English.
Mm (me)- same as in English.
Nn (ne)- same as in Engish.
Oo (o)- always pronounced like ‘oa’ in boat or ‘o’ in ghost.
Pp (pe)- same as in English.
Qq (que)- only used with ‘u’ to form qui and que which are pronounced ‘kee’ and ‘kay’ respectively.
Rr (re)- trilled like Spanish ‘r’ in rico.
Ss (se)- always pronounced like ‘s’ in soon or ‘ss’ in mattress, never like English ‘z’ or ‘s’ in pleasure.
Sci (sci)- always pronounced like ‘sh’ in sheep.
Tt (te)- always like ‘t’ in to never like ‘t’ in tree.
Uu (u)- always like ‘oo’ in too.
Vv (ve)- pronounced like ‘v’ in very, never pronounced like German or Spanish ‘v’.
Xx (ixe)- always pronounced as ‘ks’ in extra, never like ‘x’ in xylophone.
Zz (zeta)- always pronounced like ‘z’ in zoo, never like Italian or Spanish ‘z’.

K, w and y are not used.

Ai- is pronounced like the English word eye. Or like Spanish ‘ai’ in bailar.
Ei- pronounced separately as ‘ay-ee’
Oi- pronounced like ‘oy’ in boy.
Ui- pronounced like Spanish ‘uy’ in muy.
Eu- pronounced separately as ‘ay-oo’.
Au- pronounced separately as ‘ah-oo’.
Ao- pronounced like ‘ow’ in down.

Due to time constraints I will post the grammar at a later date.
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby locuroso » Mon 01 Jun 2009 8:12 pm

Also note that 'cu' makes the 'kw' sound.
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby ILuvEire » Tue 02 Jun 2009 6:41 am

I've got a question, you use J for Latin's Y sound, but what happened to the W sound?
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby Caenwyr » Tue 02 Jun 2009 8:30 am

ILuvEire wrote:I've got a question, you use J for Latin's Y sound, but what happened to the W sound?


I was thinking the same thing, plus, could you give us some examples of the language? Due to it's geographical overlap with nowadays Italy I presume Latino Volgaro will look pretty Italianish.
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby locuroso » Tue 02 Jun 2009 4:41 pm

ILuvEire wrote:I've got a question, you use J for Latin's Y sound, but what happened to the W sound?

Good question, the 'w' sound is still in the language, just that most initial 'w' sounds will be converted to the 'v' sound.

As for the location of the language, it is roughly located (fictionally) in the area around Monaco, and spread out to boarder parts of France, Germany, and Italy. So it will have some influences from each of these languages.
The language is still work in progress and I'm working on a backdrop story to go along with it. I do have most of the grammar done including noun declensions, and verb conjugations; which I will post later this evening.

I should also note that to make the hard 'g' sound before 'e' and 'i' gu+i or e is used.
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby locuroso » Wed 03 Jun 2009 5:17 pm

Each noun has only 3 cases. The accusative is used as the ablative, dative, locative and accusative. Here is the declension for feminine nouns, which end in 'a' or 'e'.
Latin nouns like animal, shifted also they went from animalia in the nominative plural to animalia in the nominative singular and are now part of the 'a' declension.
Latin nouns that end in 's' such as pars or ars in the nominative singular shift to take the plural form, minus the 's', as the nominative singular. For example: pars-> parte, ars-> arte, these nouns are now part of the 'e' declension.

Note that in the 2nd person plural the noun ending does not change to match the noun it possesses.

('a' nouns) Singular
Nominative: rosa (rose)
Accusative: rosam
Genitive: rosai

nom.: rose
accu.: rosas
gen.: rosari

('e' nouns) singular
Nom: nube
Accu: nubem
Gen.: nubis

plural
nom.: nubes
accu.: nubes
gen.: nubiom

I will post more at a later time.
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby linguoboy » Wed 03 Jun 2009 7:35 pm

So what does this language have to do with Vulgar Latin any more? The final m in forms like rosam and nubem may have been silent in speech even before Caesar's day and was certainly gone without a trace by Late Antiquity.
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby locuroso » Wed 03 Jun 2009 8:28 pm

linguoboy wrote:So what does this language have to do with Vulgar Latin any more? The final m in forms like rosam and nubem may have been silent in speech even before Caesar's day and was certainly gone without a trace by Late Antiquity.


That may very well be true, nobody trully knows with 100% certainty that it was or wasn't. So I put it in anyways, all I can do is look at various paterns and see what changed to this or that and make an educated guess. After all the language is fictional, and asides from that its still work in progress so any of these declensions can change at anytime.
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby linguoboy » Wed 03 Jun 2009 10:10 pm

locuroso wrote:That may very well be true, nobody trully knows with 100% certainty that it was or wasn't.

If you wanna play that game, then we can't be 100% certain that anyone in Ancient Rome ever actually spoke Latin at all. After all, we don't have any recordings of them doing it.

So I put it in anyways, all I can do is look at various paterns and see what changed to this or that and make an educated guess.

Well, you're halfway there. What are your scholarly sources for Vulgar Latin?

It's fine if you want to keep the declensional system of Classical Latin intact, but if so you need to go back to an earlier form of the language than Vulgar Latin and derive your conlang from that.
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Re: Latino Volgaro

Postby locuroso » Wed 03 Jun 2009 10:14 pm

linguoboy wrote:
locuroso wrote:That may very well be true, nobody trully knows with 100% certainty that it was or wasn't.

If you wanna play that game, then we can't be 100% certain that anyone in Ancient Rome ever actually spoke Latin at all. After all, we don't have any recordings of them doing it.

So I put it in anyways, all I can do is look at various paterns and see what changed to this or that and make an educated guess.

Well, you're halfway there. What are your scholarly sources for Vulgar Latin?

It's fine if you want to keep the declensional system of Classical Latin intact, but if so you need to go back to an earlier form of the language than Vulgar Latin and derive your conlang from that.


Ok, lets get one thing straight here, what I stated in my last post was in no way offensive. You need to take a chill pill buddy!
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