Hola a todo.

The place to introduce yourselves.

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Aeetlrcreejl » Fri 24 Jul 2009 1:26 am

I set my keyboard to US-International which should be in your computer's keyboard options.

I modified my keyboard more so that characters like š, ‽, and 元 are as easy to type as á or æ.
Aeetlrcreejl
 
Posts: 72
Joined: Sat 18 Apr 2009 7:56 am

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Talib » Fri 24 Jul 2009 2:48 am

dtp883 wrote:In my opinion Hebrew, at least among linguist and amateurs like us, is also a very very common language that is learned.
I don't think it's all that common, except as a heritage language for Jewish people. Neither is Arabic, although it's catching on in popularity. And while both Mandarin and Japanese are reasonably popular choices, they aren't to the extent they probably deserve (especially Mandarin).
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Neqitan » Fri 24 Jul 2009 4:47 am

ñ = Alt+164 if you're on a Windows machine.

You can type without accents in Spanish chatting ("you can"? more like "you must!", since no one really puts them :) ), but the ñ is always essential since "ano" is quiet gross to read, so you'd better learn it.

Talib wrote:
dtp883 wrote:In my opinion Hebrew, at least among linguist and amateurs like us, is also a very very common language that is learned.
I don't think it's all that common, except as a heritage language for Jewish people. Neither is Arabic, although it's catching on in popularity. And while both Mandarin and Japanese are reasonably popular choices, they aren't to the extent they probably deserve (especially Mandarin).

Yep, I've never met a student of Hebrew (and I mean, a student really into mastering Hebrew, not just dabbling with it) who wasn't Jewish. Arabic catching on? Not really... Japanese attracts too much attention with its anime, IMO (in El Salvador there are even CLUBS for learning and speaking Japanese essentially for this purpose, while Mandarin is practically non-existant...); but yeah, it's not that common, at least in the way Spanish are French are.

Hmmm... Now that I think about it, it really depends on your region. In Korea (the "South" part is implied) Mandarin and Japanese are extremely common. You can easily take Arabic courses in Israel...
User avatar
Neqitan
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Fri 17 Apr 2009 9:59 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Sean of the Dead » Fri 24 Jul 2009 5:18 am

Kotoba_Azul wrote:P.S. Sean o' the dead, what would YOU recommend as far as unusual languages go?

Well, I can't really recommend you to learn a specific language, since not all people like the same ones, but the "exotic" ones on my list are Basque, Lushootseed, Northern Sami, and Scots. 8-)
Sami and (most likely) Lushootseed I will learn, but Basque and Scots won't be for a looong time, probably 15 or more years. 8-)
Sean of the Dead
 
Posts: 189
Joined: Fri 17 Apr 2009 8:46 pm
Location: Renton, WA

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby ILuvEire » Fri 24 Jul 2009 5:21 am

Kotoba_Azul wrote:P.S. Sean o' the dead, what would YOU recommend as far as unusual languages go?

Czech is a fun language. :lol:
dansk - italiano - esperanto - Deutsch - português - tiếng Việt - עברית - ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i - ελλινικά - العربية - 中文 - íslenska
User avatar
ILuvEire
 
Posts: 332
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 10:42 am
Location: Austin, TX, USA

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby formiko » Fri 24 Jul 2009 8:15 am

I learned both Hebrew and Koine Greek (and Aramaic) to read the scriptures in the original languages. (And Aramaic, since Jesus and the disciples spoke Aramaic as their mother tongue, which will help to understand their foreign Greek) I also have a deep love for the ancient languages of the Americas, and since my grandma was a fluent Cherokee speker, she taught me.
I specialize in Athabaskan languages, but I also have a love for sub-Saharan African languages.
If you want exotic (but not typical like Finnish), try Estonian or Indonesian. Estonian sounds nicer than Finnish, and Indonesian is a piece of cake so you're not constantly being beaten down from learning a Finnic language. :)
But of course I'll recommend a Native American language. My recommendation is to learn the language that was spoken within 50 miles of where you live (unless you're not from the Americas).
Tell me where you live, and I'll give you some suggestions.
ᏙᏒᏓᎵ ᏗᏑᎶ ᎭᏫ
User avatar
formiko
 
Posts: 404
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:31 am
Location: Angola

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Talib » Fri 24 Jul 2009 5:39 pm

Neqitan wrote:Arabic catching on? Not really... Japanese attracts too much attention with its anime, IMO (in El Salvador there are even CLUBS for learning and speaking Japanese essentially for this purpose, while Mandarin is practically non-existant...); but yeah, it's not that common, at least in the way Spanish are French are.
Arabic is now offered in most universities, and enrollment is increasing steadily. Same with Mandarin. Japanese is just overexposed because of the international success of its pop culture. If anime were Chinese, that'd be the new trendy language.
Sami and (most likely) Lushootseed I will learn, but Basque and Scots won't be for a looong time, probably 15 or more years.
I'm assuming you're learning these for a challenge, not fun, but couldn't you learn a widely spoken difficult language like Russian or Mandarin?
I learned both Hebrew and Koine Greek (and Aramaic) to read the scriptures in the original languages. (And Aramaic, since Jesus and the disciples spoke Aramaic as their mother tongue, which will help to understand their foreign Greek)
I have to ask, how fluent are you in any of these? I don't mean that as a personal slight to you, but learning Aramaic for one seems like quite a challenge since it's not like there's a wealth of material and numerous native speakers.
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Sean of the Dead » Fri 24 Jul 2009 8:36 pm

Talib wrote:
Sami and (most likely) Lushootseed I will learn, but Basque and Scots won't be for a looong time, probably 15 or more years.
I'm assuming you're learning these for a challenge, not fun, but couldn't you learn a widely spoken difficult language like Russian or Mandarin?

Well, Basque and Scots would be for fun. Sami I will most likely learn because it's my favorite Uralic language by far, and I plan to move to Tromsø, Norway by 2025, which is the area it is spoken in. I will hopefully learn Lushootseed from a course near here, because I absolutely love the sound of it, and have long wanted to learn a Native American language from my area, like what Formiko said. :)
Unfortunately, there are only around 60 speakers, but there are several natives teaching it around here in colleges and on their own. 8-)

And why I don't learn any language with a lot of speakers? I guess I don't like to learn languages that tons of other people are learning, I like to try to be unique. ;) And Russian is way too irregular for me, and I prefer Cantonese over Mandarin, but starting next year (September), I will be learning Japanese in school, which is enough kanji for me. :P
Sean of the Dead
 
Posts: 189
Joined: Fri 17 Apr 2009 8:46 pm
Location: Renton, WA

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby Talib » Fri 24 Jul 2009 10:46 pm

Sean of the Dead wrote:Well, Basque and Scots would be for fun.
Your idea of fun is learning Basque? That's closer to my idea of masochism.
Sami I will most likely learn because it's my favorite Uralic language by far, and I plan to move to Tromsø, Norway by 2025, which is the area it is spoken in.
I don't know how much you'd use it even there, compared to Norwegian.
I will hopefully learn Lushootseed from a course near here, because I absolutely love the sound of it, and have long wanted to learn a Native American language from my area, like what Formiko said. :)
Unfortunately, there are only around 60 speakers, but there are several natives teaching it around here in colleges and on their own.
Reviving moribund languages is an admirable goal and all, but to talk to less than one hundred people, when you're going to move anyway? Is that worth the tradeoff?
And why I don't learn any language with a lot of speakers? I guess I don't like to learn languages that tons of other people are learning, I like to try to be unique. ;) And Russian is way too irregular for me, and I prefer Cantonese over Mandarin, but starting next year (September), I will be learning Japanese in school, which is enough kanji for me. :P
Fair enough, but I'm more concerned with the usefulness of languages rather than the individualist cred they give me (although Arabic arguably does both). I think Japanese is a good choice. I would learn it if I were bothered enough.
العربية * 中文 * English * Français * Русский * Português * Español * हिन्दी/اردو * Deutsch * 日本語
Talib
 
Posts: 768
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:22 am
Location: Canada

Re: Hola a todo.

Postby formiko » Fri 24 Jul 2009 11:50 pm

Talib wrote:I have to ask, how fluent are you in any of these? I don't mean that as a personal slight to you, but learning Aramaic for one seems like quite a challenge since it's not like there's a wealth of material and numerous native speakers.


Well, I can read Greek and Hebrew, and enough Aramaic to help me understand the Greek. (Both Paul and Matthew spoke Aramaic as their mother tongue, and they used alot of Aramaic terms in their Greek) For example, the Aramaic word d'khemT'aA
For example, in Matthew 5:39 it says "But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil" (King James). But if Jesus said this in Aramaic, he would have been quoting Ps 37:1-8, which use the Aramaic word d'khemT'aA which means revenge, not just "resist evil" as it does in Greek. It's these little nuances that I like. Aramaic wasn't mandatory in seminary, but I learned it anyway.
ᏙᏒᏓᎵ ᏗᏑᎶ ᎭᏫ
User avatar
formiko
 
Posts: 404
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 8:31 am
Location: Angola

PreviousNext

Return to Introductions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests