Forms of address in English

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Forms of address in English

Postby jan.zajec » Sat 25 Feb 2012 3:44 pm

Hello everybody,

I just wondered if I grasped this correctly.

So, if:
-Talking to/about someone whose name is known, I use ‘Mr’, ‘Mrs’, or ‘Miss’; e.g. ‘Hello, Mr Smith.’
-Talking to someone whose name is unknown, I use ‘Sir’ or ‘Madam’; e.g. ‘Can I help you, sir?’
-Talking about someone whose name is unknown, I use ‘Gentleman’ or ‘Lady’; e.g. ‘Would you excuse me for a moment, I must talk to this gentleman here.’

Is this correct?

Thanks for your help!
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Re: Forms of address in English

Postby Yaziq » Sat 25 Feb 2012 6:22 pm

Yes, you are correct in your understanding. There is also 'Ms.'(mizz), but I'm not sure exactly under what circumstances this term is used. There is a feminist magazine entitled 'Ms.', but I don't think the term has gained popularity. This is a bit off topic, but I notice that in the U.S.A. people don't say 'Good Day', whereas in Australia you can say 'G'day mate'. In the U.S.A. people greet someone by saying 'Hey' or 'How's it going?'
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Re: Forms of address in English

Postby linguoboy » Sat 25 Feb 2012 7:58 pm

Yaziq wrote:Yes, you are correct in your understanding. There is also 'Ms.'(mizz), but I'm not sure exactly under what circumstances this term is used.

It's used when the marital status of the women is unknown or when you simply don't wish to emphasise it. In my university, for instance, we didn't use academic titles for professors, only "Mr" and "Ms". (The point was that people's ideas and argumentation should be evaluated independently of their rank or social status.)
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Re: Forms of address in English

Postby erikespo » Sun 26 Feb 2012 6:16 pm

Madam may seem "old fashioned" Ma'am (the first a sounding like ankle, the second like ample) or Miss is used more frequently.


The use of gentleman or lady could be replaced with person in your e.g.
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Re: Forms of address in English

Postby jan.zajec » Sun 26 Feb 2012 11:11 pm

Thank you very much! :D

It's a bit complicated for me because in my language, we only have one set of words that convey all meanings.

Bye :)
Native: slovenščina
Good: English, français, Deutsch
Basic: castellano, italiano, hrvatski, српски, bosanski, црногорски, македонски, polski, русский, magyar, Latina, Ἑλληνική, СЛОВѢНЬСКЪІИ
Wishes: brezhoneg, Kernewek, Gaeilge, Gaelg, Gàidhlig, Cymraeg
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jan.zajec
 
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