Celtic Languages

The place to discuss endangered languages, and efforts being made to revive them.

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby linguoboy » Wed 17 Mar 2010 9:01 pm

I'm not too sure what the combining form of "Slovenian" would be in Irish. My stab at the correct form is An Cumann Cairdis Slóivéini-Cheiltaigh on the basis of an Cumann Ibeirni-Cheilteach "the Iberno-Celtic Society".
english*deutsch*nederlands*català*castellano*gaelainn*cymraeg*français*svenska*韓國말*漢語
linguoboy
 
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:02 am

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby Tikolm » Fri 26 Oct 2012 1:52 am

I feel like I should post here.
As you can see from my siggy, I'm currently learning Welsh. That's all well and good, but I don't think it would be a good plan for me to try to learn the other Celtic languages because I think I'd just get all mixed up in very short order. It's not really that I don't want to, but I've heard enough bad things about knowing two closely related languages that I'm discouraged from it. As well, getting my head around VSO word order, "she's after throwing rain", dialect differences in tag questions, etc. and trying to keep my English and French straight at the same time has been enough of a struggle that I'd rather not make it any worse. :P
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby choc_pud » Thu 27 Dec 2012 4:15 pm

Irish and Welsh are so different, I personally've had no problem with learning both at the same time. It interesting, seeing the similarities though!

:ugeek:
Dyfal donc a dyr y garreg, ydy?
User avatar
choc_pud
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Fri 21 Sep 2012 12:53 am

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby Tikolm » Wed 02 Jan 2013 4:11 am

Come to think of it, if I tried to learn Irish and Welsh, or whatever, at the same time, I'd probably just stop due to inability to multitask, never mind the danger of coming up with some degree of Wirish whenever I tried to use either language. In any case, I'm pretty sure that if I tried to tackle Irish right now I would end up calquing it on Welsh if I didn't try really hard to think of them separately. I will always have to remember that not everyone has an yn, for example; I always want to stick yn in stuff no matter what language it may be. (*I'm yn making coffee.) I never stopped finding it strange that in Welsh you have an yn in both Maen nhw'n fawr and Maen nhw'n ysgrifennu but in Scottish Gaelic (and probably Irish is similar) you have Tha iad mor and Tha iad a' sgriobhadh, and *Tha iad a' mor doesn't work just as *Maen nhw fawr doesn't. Apparently SG doesn't have any word serving the function of yn + soft mutation.
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby linguoboy » Wed 02 Jan 2013 4:26 pm

Tikolm wrote:Apparently SG doesn't have any word serving the function of yn + soft mutation.

Tha mi nam shaor
Be.PRS 1S in.my carpenter

In this construction, "carpenter" (saor) is lenited.
english*deutsch*nederlands*català*castellano*gaelainn*cymraeg*français*svenska*韓國말*漢語
linguoboy
 
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:02 am

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby Tikolm » Sat 05 Jan 2013 1:48 am

linguoboy wrote:
Tikolm wrote:Apparently SG doesn't have any word serving the function of yn + soft mutation.

Tha mi nam shaor
Be.PRS 1S in.my carpenter

In this construction, "carpenter" (saor) is lenited.
Only trouble is I can't figure out what it means. "I am in my carpenter"? What's serving the function of yn, would you say?
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby linguoboy » Sat 05 Jan 2013 2:24 am

Tikolm wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Tikolm wrote:Apparently SG doesn't have any word serving the function of yn + soft mutation.

Tha mi nam shaor
Be.PRS 1S in.my carpenter

In this construction, "carpenter" (saor) is lenited.
Only trouble is I can't figure out what it means. "I am in my carpenter"? What's serving the function of yn, would you say?

ann "in". Wouldn't you?
english*deutsch*nederlands*català*castellano*gaelainn*cymraeg*français*svenska*韓國말*漢語
linguoboy
 
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:02 am

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby Tikolm » Mon 07 Jan 2013 1:36 am

linguoboy wrote:ann "in". Wouldn't you?
Sure. I still can't figure out what it means, though. "I am a carpenter", maybe?
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby linguoboy » Mon 07 Jan 2013 2:53 am

Tikolm wrote:
linguoboy wrote:ann "in". Wouldn't you?
Sure. I still can't figure out what it means, though. "I am a carpenter", maybe?

That's exactly what it means.

In central and southern Irish, this sort of construction contrasts with a simple Is saor mé "I am an artisan[*]" and emphasises that the state is temporally bounded in some way, i.e. "I am an artisan now; previously I was just an apprentice." But in Ulster Irish and Scottish Gaelic, this is simply the unmarked way of identifying your profession.


[*] "Carpenter" is siúinéir or saor crainn "artisan of wood".
english*deutsch*nederlands*català*castellano*gaelainn*cymraeg*français*svenska*韓國말*漢語
linguoboy
 
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:02 am

Re: Celtic Languages

Postby Shenn Ghaelgeyr » Fri 06 Dec 2013 11:36 am

Just to 'complete the set', so to speak, the construction is very similar in Gaelg (Manx Gaelic). There are two ways of saying "I am a fool", namely "She bleb mish" and "Ta mee my vleb" - in the second case, the word "my" means "in-my-state-of-being-a" and causes mutation of the following noun.

The mutations run through the personal pronouns as follows: -
1 sg. Ta mee my vleb
2sg. T'ou dty vleb
3sg. masc. T'eh ny vleb
3 sg. fem. T'ee ny bleb
1,2,3 pl.
Native : English
Good: French, Gaelg (Manx Gaelic)
Basic : German
Limited : Spanish, Modern Greek
Shenn Ghaelgeyr
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue 08 Oct 2013 6:55 am

PreviousNext

Return to Endangered languages and language revival

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron