Albanian and English

The place to use Languages other than English (LOTE) to discuss whatever you like.

Albanian and English

Postby Sprochamaedli » Thu 09 May 2013 8:14 pm

Has anyone else noticed how Albanian and English phonologies are very similar, almost exactly the same? I thought it was really interesting, especially since they're not closely related.
наверное мне место на луне, но страшно оставаться в темноте...
------------
Native:English
Proficient: deutsch, schwiizerdütsch, русский язык
Understand a little: français, español, italiano, cymraeg, 한국, and more
User avatar
Sprochamaedli
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat 28 May 2011 7:06 am

Re: Albanian and English

Postby linguoboy » Fri 10 May 2013 4:33 pm

Sprochamaedli wrote:Has anyone else noticed how Albanian and English phonologies are very similar, almost exactly the same?

I'm not sure what you mean. The vowel inventories are totally distinct (Albanian has a 7-vowel system; several varieties of English have twice that many distinctive vowels before you even begin to count diphthongs). In the consonants, Albanian has a whole palatal series lacking in English as well as phonemic distinction between trilled and flapped r and "light" and "dark" l.

Sure you're not just making too much of the presence of a couple of dental fricatives? Arabic has those, too, you know.
english*deutsch*nederlands*català*castellano*gaelainn*cymraeg*français*svenska*韓國말*漢語
linguoboy
 
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:02 am

Re: Albanian and English

Postby telal » Sat 11 May 2013 9:38 pm

albanian is on it's own language family branch

this is not by accident
לא משנה
User avatar
telal
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Sat 18 Apr 2009 8:48 pm

Re: Albanian and English

Postby Sprochamaedli » Sun 12 May 2013 8:16 pm

albanian is on it's own language family branch

Yes, I know. But they're still both Indo-European. I did say that they weren't closely related..

I'm not sure what you mean. The vowel inventories are totally distinct (Albanian has a 7-vowel system; several varieties of English have twice that many distinctive vowels before you even begin to count diphthongs). In the consonants, Albanian has a whole palatal series lacking in English as well as phonemic distinction between trilled and flapped r and "light" and "dark" l.


I wasn't talking about just vowels, and I was talking about sounds not spelling. English has "light" and "dark" l as well. Also, a lot of English accents have a flapped r and also, I've heard Albanian accents with a rhotic r. You can look at the phonology of each language. Which looks closer to English, the Albanian or the Dutch, which is closely related to English?
English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_phonology
Albanian: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albanian_language
Dutch: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_phonology

The charts of English and Albanian look fairly similar if you ask me.

Sure you're not just making too much of the presence of a couple of dental fricatives? Arabic has those, too, you know.


I'm aware of dental fricatives in other languages ;) Greek, Welsh, Spanish...etc.
наверное мне место на луне, но страшно оставаться в темноте...
------------
Native:English
Proficient: deutsch, schwiizerdütsch, русский язык
Understand a little: français, español, italiano, cymraeg, 한국, and more
User avatar
Sprochamaedli
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat 28 May 2011 7:06 am

Re: Albanian and English

Postby linguoboy » Mon 13 May 2013 5:58 pm

Sprochamaedli wrote:I wasn't talking about just vowels, and I was talking about sounds not spelling.

I wasn't talking about spelling either, but I was discussing phonemes where you seem to be focussing on phones.

Sprochamaedli wrote:English has "light" and "dark" l as well. Also, a lot of English accents have a flapped r and also, I've heard Albanian accents with a rhotic r. You can look at the phonology of each language. Which looks closer to English, the Albanian or the Dutch, which is closely related to English?
English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_phonology
Albanian: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albanian_language
Dutch: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_phonology

As far as vowels go, I don't think you're considering them at all. There's clearly more resemblance between the vowel systems of English and Dutch than between either of them and Albanian.

I have a flapped [ɾ] in my English, but as an allophone of /d/ and /t/. Moreover, that's a pretty specifically American English feature.
english*deutsch*nederlands*català*castellano*gaelainn*cymraeg*français*svenska*韓國말*漢語
linguoboy
 
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:02 am

Re: Albanian and English

Postby telal » Mon 13 May 2013 7:19 pm

Sprochamaedli wrote:But they're still both Indo-European.

as are these...what's your point?
לא משנה
User avatar
telal
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Sat 18 Apr 2009 8:48 pm

Re: Albanian and English

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Mon 13 May 2013 11:49 pm

I doubt many of the shared features are of common origin. Even the interdental fricatives aren't included in PIE. (Strangely, they seem to be a peripheral feature around Europe.)
Dan_ad_nauseam
 
Posts: 224
Joined: Sat 18 Apr 2009 5:25 am

Re: Albanian and English

Postby Sprochamaedli » Tue 14 May 2013 11:00 am

as are these...what's your point?


I just meant, you seemed to be mentioning it like I wasn't considering it.
наверное мне место на луне, но страшно оставаться в темноте...
------------
Native:English
Proficient: deutsch, schwiizerdütsch, русский язык
Understand a little: français, español, italiano, cymraeg, 한국, and more
User avatar
Sprochamaedli
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat 28 May 2011 7:06 am

Re: Albanian and English

Postby telal » Tue 14 May 2013 7:40 pm

no...

their vowels systems aren't similar, and you mentioning them both being indo-european was non sequitur
לא משנה
User avatar
telal
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Sat 18 Apr 2009 8:48 pm


Return to Languages other than English

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron