Middle English

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Middle English

Postby firegem123 » Thu 18 Nov 2010 1:49 am

Next week in my English class, my teacher is going to start teaching us some Middle English. Is there anything important I should know about it, like pronunciation and such? Thanks!
Native: English
Fluent: English
Basic: 日本語, 中文, Español
Current: 日本語, 中文, ᏣᎳᎩ
Future: Deutsch, 한국어, हिन्दी, Русский
Conlang: Chiang-gok

Some proverbs to live by:
馬鹿は死ななきゃ治らない。
水能载舟,亦能覆舟。
짚신도 짝이 있다.
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Re: Middle English

Postby dtp883 » Fri 19 Nov 2010 1:40 am

Phonologically, I believe the only differences from Modern English are the inclusion and lack of certain vowels, e.g., /y/ and /œ/, the presence of vowel length, the presence of /x/, and it's possible that the /r/ be trilled. Not entirely sure, depends on your teacher, I guess.

Vocabulary wise, this was the beginning of the mass importation of French (Latinate) words so they may look different and may have more common, for the time, germanic counterparts. e.g. sight instead of vision.

Grammatically, I believe there are more inflections. Not Sure

Oh yeah, also the presence of /ç/ which was lost in Modern English. (But it reappears in modern English, although I only consistently pronounce it in the word human, /çjumɛn/.)
Native: English (NW American)
Advanced: Spanish
Intermediate: French
Beginning: Arabic (MSA/Egyptian)
Some day: German
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Re: Middle English

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Sat 20 Nov 2010 9:43 am

dtp883 wrote:Phonologically, I believe the only differences from Modern English are the inclusion and lack of certain vowels, e.g., /y/ and /œ/, the presence of vowel length, the presence of /x/, and it's possible that the /r/ be trilled. Not entirely sure, depends on your teacher, I guess.

. . . .


Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you forgot the GVS.
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