Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

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Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby UndeadFishtank » Thu 08 Dec 2011 6:38 am

This is the second conlang I've worked on, and I'm using the first as a guide, but I'm scrapping the first because it seems forced and overly complicated for a first attempt! It doesn't currently have a name, but it's based mostly off Spanish. It also has some influences from other languages, such as Russian. It is definitely a work in progress, so things will probably change all the time. As it is one of the first conlangs I've ever worked on, I think it would be awesome if I could have a few pointers if you see anything you want to comment on! I kinda use the Rosetta Stone lesson plan and translate that as I go, so it adds more elements as one would naturally learn them, allowing me not to dive too deeply into a conlang all at once. I don't really know the whole alphabet I'm going to be using, but I guess I'll post that next. Then I can update it as I add things. The pronunciations generally follow that of Spanish, but there are some exceptions so I'll try to put up some IPA and a guide once I get a chance to figure all that out! This is a big adventure for me, and I hope you guys can give me some feedback somewhere along the road!

Thanks,
UF :D
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby UndeadFishtank » Thu 08 Dec 2011 7:04 am

Alphabet - will be updated as more letters are used

A - /a/ - Spanish haber
B - /b/ - English baby
C - /k/ - English car (c is never soft)
D - /d/ - English dad
E - /e/ - Spanish lejos
F - /f/ - English face
G - /ɡ/ - English gone (g is never soft)
H - /x/ - Spanish México
I - /i/ - Spanish mío
J - /j/ - English yes
L - /l/ - English leaves
M - /m/ - English mother
N - /n/ - English never
O - /o/ - Spanish oro
P - /p/ - English person
R - /ɾ/ - Spanish caro
S - /s/ - English secret
T - /t/ - Spanish tango
U - /w/ - English water (not considered a vowel)
Z - /z/ - English zoo

Digraphs
CH - /tʃ/ - English chew
Last edited by UndeadFishtank on Thu 08 Dec 2011 7:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby UndeadFishtank » Thu 08 Dec 2011 7:15 am

Some example sentences

N giho da n giha eso ueno; a selojo emo canta!
Come sons and daughters, we all sing.

O deaza r'eto ca dia bonim!
I hope you have a good day!

Eno cuizina nei. Eno coma.
They are not cooking. They are eating.

A scola e diriga cago.
The woman is driving a car.

Basic verb conjugation

UndeadFishtank wrote:This sounds kind of like what I'm doing with the language I'm making at the moment! But I have different auxiliary verbs according to gender, number, and person and then different endings for the verbs to indicate tense.

For example:
O coma. – I eat.
E coma. – He/she eats.
Eno* coma. – They eat.
Emo* coma. – We eat.
Eto* coma. – You eat. (singular)
Eso* coma. – You eat. (plural)

* These can end in o or a, which indicates gender: o is masculine; a is feminine.

Tenses:
Eto coma. – You eat. (present)
Eto come. – You ate. (past)
Eto comi. – You will eat (future)
Eto como. – You, eat. (command/imperative)

I haven't figured out other tenses and stuff, but this is basically how it works in the language I'm doing! Also, I realize that e/eno/eto/etc. kind of works as a pronoun, but it's required every time a verb is used, even if the sentence already has a noun, so it's kind of like an auxiliary verb. :)
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby UndeadFishtank » Thu 08 Dec 2011 9:54 am

So apparently you can't edit posts that are older than a couple hours? That's okay, I guess. At least it keeps a good record of things that I've done in the past! I just want to post a little bit about adjectives in this language, and also does anyone have any tips for coming up with a name?

Adjectives; how do they work?

Adjectives in this language can basically be made out of any word. Since there is no word for "to be" or any kind of existence, you say that "something is someway" in the following way:

Subject aux.verb adjective-tense.

So, in other words, to say "My day was good," you would say:

A dia onim e bonime.
The day of.me it good-PAST.

Basically, to make something into an adjective, you either add "im" to the end, or you take off the final letter and add "im." To say that "something is something" is similar. Because there is no way to say "is" or "are" and you still have to indicate tense in most cases, there is a way to change nouns into "objects" and indicate tense.

For example, to say "This woman was a girl," you would say:

Ai scola e scinaze.
The.specific woman she girl-PAST.

Instead of just adding e, a, or i, which could blend in with the vowel at the end of the noun, we add z+[tense] to indicate the tense. Also notice that "the" (a) becomes "this/that" (ai) when you add an "i" to it. "Ai" itself also means "yes" and can be added at the end of a sentence to add emphasis of affirmation.

Adjectives are always placed after nouns.

Questions; how do they work?

Questions follow normal sentence structure, except they also include a question indicator ("ri") at the end of the main phrase, and may also include question words, such as "cacim" (how).

For example:

A dia etim e cacime ri, zenjor? A dia onim e bonime.
The day of.you it how-PAST QUE, sir? The day of.me it good-PAST.
How was your day, sir? My day was good.

More on questions later, when I can figure out more question words and such. For now, I hope that this was sufficient to get you interested in this language! :)
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby UndeadFishtank » Fri 09 Dec 2011 1:20 am

Numbers

Numbers in this language are compounded after reaching nine, so I'll go over that in this post.

0 - zero
1 - ado
2 - dua
3 - tre
4 - che
5 - cina
6 - seca
7 - seta
8 - ocho
9 - neue

Now we start compounding. Although we can include "zero" at the end of the tens, it is not really necessary and it is usually more practical to leave it off.

10 - adoci / adocizero
11 - adociado
12 - adocidua
13 - adocitre
14 - adociche
15 - adocicina
16 - adociseca
17 - adociseta
18 - adociocho
19 - adocineue

All of the tens follow this pattern, with the number of the tens place followed by "ci" and then by the number in the ones place.

20 - duaci / duacizero
30 - treci / trecizero
40 - checi / checizero
50 - cinaci / cinacizero
60 - secaci / secacizero
70 - setaci / setacizero
80 - ochoci / ochocizero
90 - neueci / neuecizero

After the tens come the hundreds, which are annotated in the same way as the ones except they come before the tens, since the number system used in this language uses pairs of digits at a time. So here are a few examples:

326 - tre duaciseca
548 - cina checiocho
791 - seta neueciado

And obviously adding thousands, etc, etc works in the same way. Should be pretty simple! :)

Decimals

Decimals work in the same way as whole numbers. Between the whole numbers and decimals is the word "ponto" to distinguish between the whole numbers and the decimals. So in essence it is like this:

3928.67 - trecineue duaciocho ponto secaciseta

Hope this helped with the learning of numbers! I'll probably do something about mathematics later, but I don't feel like it right now. :)
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby linguoboy » Fri 09 Dec 2011 9:35 pm

UndeadFishtank wrote:Adjectives; how do they work?

Adjectives in this language can basically be made out of any word. Since there is no word for "to be" or any kind of existence, you say that "something is someway" in the following way:

Subject aux.verb adjective-tense.

So, in other words, to say "My day was good," you would say:

A dia onim e bonime.
The day of.me it good-PAST.

Basically, to make something into an adjective, you either add "im" to the end, or you take off the final letter and add "im." To say that "something is something" is similar. Because there is no way to say "is" or "are" and you still have to indicate tense in most cases, there is a way to change nouns into "objects" and indicate tense.

For example, to say "This woman was a girl," you would say:

Ai scola e scinaze.
The.specific woman she girl-PAST.

Instead of just adding e, a, or i, which could blend in with the vowel at the end of the noun, we add z+[tense] to indicate the tense. Also notice that "the" (a) becomes "this/that" (ai) when you add an "i" to it. "Ai" itself also means "yes" and can be added at the end of a sentence to add emphasis of affirmation.

See, this makes me think that your tense suffixes have more cause to be called "auxiliaries" than your subject pronouns. What you've come up with is almost identical to the Turkish copula, which works as a suffixed auxiliary.
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby UndeadFishtank » Fri 09 Dec 2011 11:53 pm

linguoboy wrote:See, this makes me think that your tense suffixes have more cause to be called "auxiliaries" than your subject pronouns. What you've come up with is almost identical to the Turkish copula, which works as a suffixed auxiliary.


This is very interesting! See, I don't know very much about many languages, but in my previous (begun-but-never-finished) conlang, Cakuacakuán, I decided that I did not want to have a verb for "to be," and so a sentence such as "This is a bicycle," translated to "Ce abicikleta" (/tse əˌbitsiˈkɺetä/). That literally means "This a-bicycle." This was inspired by Russian. But then when I was constructing this language, which is based heavily off of Cakuacakuán, I realized that in the case that you are equating something to another noun or adjective, it loses the possibility of tense, so I had to think of a way to incorporate that and came up with the tense endings. I already had the adjective ending "-im" from Cakuacakuán.

Do you see any way to improve on what I have so far? It's pretty much my first conlang, since I scrapped my actual first one, so I could really use all the help I could get! :D
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Sun 11 Dec 2011 2:32 am

UndeadFishtank wrote:Alphabet - will be updated as more letters are used

A - /a/ - Spanish haber
B - /b/ - English baby
C - /k/ - English car (c is never soft)
D - /d/ - English dad
E - /e/ - Spanish lejos
F - /f/ - English face
G - /ɡ/ - English gone (g is never soft)
H - /x/ - Spanish México
I - /i/ - Spanish mío
J - /j/ - English yes
L - /l/ - English leaves
M - /m/ - English mother
N - /n/ - English never
O - /o/ - Spanish oro
P - /p/ - English person
R - /ɾ/ - Spanish caro
S - /s/ - English secret
T - /t/ - Spanish tango
U - /w/ - English water (not considered a vowel)
Z - /z/ - English zoo

Digraphs
CH - /tʃ/ - English chew


I see you have /tʃ/ but not /ʃ/. That's not exactly a common pattern, but I wouldn't rule it out. If you're working off of Spanish, it makes sense, as Spanish does tend to follow the same pattern except for loanwords.
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby UndeadFishtank » Mon 12 Dec 2011 1:29 am

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
UndeadFishtank wrote:Digraphs
CH - /tʃ/ - English chew


I see you have /tʃ/ but not /ʃ/. That's not exactly a common pattern, but I wouldn't rule it out. If you're working off of Spanish, it makes sense, as Spanish does tend to follow the same pattern except for loanwords.


In Spanish, they do have /tʃ/, but not /ʃ/, at least as far as I've seen. They used to have /ʃ/ which was represented by "x" in Old Spanish, but that has since disappeared. I may decided later that I will include /ʃ/, but I haven't used it yet, so I don't see myself using it in the language. :)
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Re: Unnamed Conlang - in progress! :)

Postby linguoboy » Mon 12 Dec 2011 5:13 pm

UndeadFishtank wrote:This is very interesting! See, I don't know very much about many languages, but in my previous (begun-but-never-finished) conlang, Cakuacakuán, I decided that I did not want to have a verb for "to be," and so a sentence such as "This is a bicycle," translated to "Ce abicikleta" (/tse əˌbitsiˈkɺetä/). That literally means "This a-bicycle." This was inspired by Russian. But then when I was constructing this language, which is based heavily off of Cakuacakuán, I realized that in the case that you are equating something to another noun or adjective, it loses the possibility of tense, so I had to think of a way to incorporate that and came up with the tense endings. I already had the adjective ending "-im" from Cakuacakuán.

A common way that languages deal with this is suppletion. For instance, future tense will be expressed with forms of a verb meaning "to become". There's also no reason why you couldn't do what languages which don't have tense as an inflection category do and simply use time adverbs. (E.g. "He at-one-time my father" = "He used to be my father".)
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