It doesn't really have a name

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It doesn't really have a name

Postby SuTaihei » Sat 30 Apr 2011 1:24 am

I've been messing around with conlangs for probably about 3 years now. Never really had the patience, but I think I'm getting better at it.

It's loosely based off pronunciation rules I've seen in languages I've touched upon.

There are 6 regular vowel sounds represented by a e (2 pronunciations) (è, é) i o u
IPA a ɛ ə i o u

e is ɛ at beginning and middle of a word. ə at end
for ɛ at end of word, é
for ə in middle, è
diphthongs- ai ei oi ue ué au aé

Consonants- b c d f g h l m n p q r s t v w x z ss
IPA- b k d f g h l m n p k ɹ s,z t v w ks z s

S is s at beginning and end. S is z in middle

Letters that cannot end a word: c g q v w x z ss
X cannot start a word

Pronouns are based on gender and number. (male/ female)
I- Io/ Ie........We- Ios/ Iès
You- Ho/ He...You- Hos/ Hès
He- Co..........They- Cos (majority male)
She- Ce........They- Cès (majority female)
It- Tu...........They- Tus

Verbs end in 'é' and are conjugated by gender and number, also.

To be- emé
I am- I'emo/ I'eme..........We are- Ios emos/ Ies emès
You are- H'emo/ H'eme....You are- Hos emos/ Hès emès
He is- C'emo..................They are- Cos emos
She is- C'eme.................They are- Cès emès
It is- T'emu....................They are- Tus emus

That's all for now. I'm open to ANY KIND of criticism.
Is there anything weird, awkward?
I like to jump straight in, so if you think that there might be something that going to give me problems later down the road, please tell me.

I think I'm also going to add í for the i sound to be pronounced separately.
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Re: It doesn't really have a name

Postby linguoboy » Sat 30 Apr 2011 9:27 pm

First off, your orthography is very much influenced by English in sort of a bad way. What reason is there to have three separate symbols for /k/? English only has that due to the accidence of history.

The vowel system isn't bad. It is a bit odd to have one open-mid vowel (/ɛ/) paired with one close-mid (/o/). More common in five-six vowels systems is for the mid-vowel phonemes to have both open and closed realisations, depending on the word. Castilian Spanish is a good example: [ɛ] in perro but [e] in pero and [ɔ] in costa but [o] in cosa.

The pronoun system is okay, if also a bit schematic. Having such a distinct form for "it" would make good sense to me if this actually represents a demonstrative (i.e. "that"). I find giving it a distinct verbal conjugation strange, however, though it could make sense if these verbal forms are really participles. In other words, I have to see how you plan to do nouns and adjectives to have an idea how "weird" this is. Also, what about polite forms?
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Re: It doesn't really have a name

Postby SuTaihei » Sun 01 May 2011 1:30 am

About the 'it' is because 'u' is like the neuter gender ending.
I guess you could also have Te and to.

I usually just make things up as I go. :lol:

I was also thinking about having noun genders: things mainly used my men, things mainly used my woman, and things used by both. masculine, feminine, neuter. :lol:

Plus, I like Romance languages, so I wanted to base a majority of it off Latin. Hence, the 'q' for relative pronouns. ;)

I also like the French way of combining vowel sounds. Like, Je aime- j'aime. Like I did with my singular pronouns.

I haven't really thought of politeness yet. I'll give it some thought.
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Re: It doesn't really have a name

Postby linguoboy » Sun 01 May 2011 3:16 am

SuTaihei wrote:About the 'it' is because 'u' is like the neuter gender ending.
I guess you could also have Te and to.

You could, but like I said, the pronoun system feels too schematic already.

SuTaihei wrote:I was also thinking about having noun genders: things mainly used my men, things mainly used my woman, and things used by both. masculine, feminine, neuter.

In natural languages, gender assignment is pretty arbitrary. Since you like Romance languages, you must know of examples like la polla and el coño.

SuTaihei wrote:I also like the French way of combining vowel sounds. Like, Je aime- j'aime. Like I did with my singular pronouns.

In most languages, there are definite rules for which vowels drop and which vowels combine. In French, for instance, shwa is always dropped next to another vowel. Other vowels can be lost in particular combinations, e.g. tu es > t'es [tɛ]. (Probably because es can be stressed under certain circumstances but tu never is.) But French also likes to insert consonants to keep vowels from running together, e.g. et on > et l'on, y a il > y a t-il, donne-m'en [formal] > donne-moi-z'en [colloquial], etc.
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Re: It doesn't really have a name

Postby SuTaihei » Sun 01 May 2011 3:39 pm

The vowel combining is pretty simple because the verb ending matches the gender. So I wouldn't think that it would pose any problems.

I hate the way that nouns are given genders in languages. My French teacher told me that the reason why they were given genders in the first place was to distinguish between words that are spelled exactly the same. un point, une pointe in French.

I also didn't really want to have any confusion with pronouns. Like in French, il can mean he or it.
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Re: It doesn't really have a name

Postby linguoboy » Sun 01 May 2011 5:04 pm

SuTaihei wrote:I hate the way that nouns are given genders in languages. My French teacher told me that the reason why they were given genders in the first place was to distinguish between words that are spelled exactly the same. un point, une pointe in French.

That's nonsense. The origins of gender are much more complex than that. For French, they go back at least as far as Proto-Indo-European. French actual has one fewer grammatical gender than its direct ancestor, Vulgar Latin.

SuTaihei wrote:I also didn't really want to have any confusion with pronouns. Like in French, il can mean he or it.

That's only "confusion" from the point of view of English. From the point of view of speakers of other languages, "it" needlessly confounds living things of unknown sex with inanimate objects. ("The cat was playing with the vase until it fell off the table.") Swahili, for instance, has different noun classes for people, things, trees, animals, abstractions--and corresponding pronouns for each.
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Re: It doesn't really have a name

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Sun 01 May 2011 7:03 pm

SuTaihei wrote:. . . .

I hate the way that nouns are given genders in languages. My French teacher told me that the reason why they were given genders in the first place was to distinguish between words that are spelled exactly the same. un point, une pointe in French.

. . . .


I agree that your French teacher is almost certainly wrong.

A point of comparison: In my conlang-in-progress, there is no way to predict gender from the noun root, nor is there a semantic basis for gender. Instead, I am marking gender with an agglutinative particle.
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Re: It doesn't really have a name

Postby SuTaihei » Mon 02 May 2011 11:25 pm

I've done some modifications.

Mute 'e' combines with any vowel with an apostrophe. Ex. ine América -> in'América

Vowels with a grave accent indicates stress.

A stressed ɛ is é. You cannot have a stressed vowel at the end of a word.
ə is never stressed.
Live vowels can combine.

From America- d'América
Of America- Do América.

With the new vowel combining rules.

Io emo/ I'eme
Ho emo/ H'eme
Co emo
C'eme
Tu emu
To emo
T'eme
Ios emos/ Iès emès
Hos emos/ Hès emès
Cos emos
Cès emès
Tus emus
Tos emos
Tès emès

Definite articles. Lo, le, lu. Los, lès, lus
Indifinite articles. O, e, u. Os, ès, us
Nouns
Chair- u shàisu
Table- u tàblu
Computer- u compùta
Dog- o shiéno/ e shiéne
Cat- o càt/ e càt
Pencil- u creiònu
Pen- u pen
Paper- u tunàlu
Car- u dilu
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Re: It doesn't really have a name

Postby Elijah » Thu 02 Feb 2012 6:14 pm

The articles and vowels look a lot like Portuguese, but no nasal vowels though.
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